FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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Liveable cities: who decides what that means and how we achieve it?

Liveable cities: who decides what that means and how we achieve it? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A liveable city has become the highest form of praise we can give to a city space. But we need to discuss what that means and who gets to participate in the process of governing and shaping a city.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 16, 2:38 AM

Investigate the criteria used to measure the liveability of the world's cities - and the current city rankings.

Examine variatiions in the criteria used to assess liveability. Identify  features of liveability considered important for the average person - such as affordability - are not included in global indices. 

 

Choose studies from  Macmillan Geoworld 7 NSW  to investigate the mesasurement of liveability. For example 

 

Chapter 6: Liveability: Perceptions and influences

Individually or in groups students can examine reasons people live in places many would consider  "unliveable". They can develop their own criteria for liveability and apply those criteria to make choices.

Chapter 7: Liveability: measurement and evironmental factors.

Investigate ways of measuring liveability including global world city indices, access to energy (electricity), transport, shelter,  employment and cultural amenities. Assess the influence of crime and safety, environmental quality and climate change on liveabiloity. 

 

 

Kristina Lemson's curator insight, April 16, 10:48 PM
This is a must read starting point for your project. It summarises some important conecpts and issues that you need to consider. 
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Urbanisation

Urbanisation | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, October 26, 2014 10:50 PM

A number of audio and video resources on urbanisation in China.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 11, 2015 2:02 AM

A series of short videos covering many aspects of the CHanging Nations / Changing Places (NSW) Units e.g. China's Internal Migration, Shanghai, Mumbai. 


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China’s Great Uprooting: Moving 250 Million Into Cities

China’s Great Uprooting: Moving 250 Million Into Cities | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A 12-year plan to move hundreds of millions of rural residents into cities is intended to spur economic growth, but could have unintended consequences, skeptics warn.

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Amanda Donecoff's comment, July 15, 2013 12:39 AM
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Amanda Donecoff's comment, July 15, 2013 1:24 AM
The people of China are on a downward slope, even though they are in a process of so much production. Their government has too much power and the people don't have enough say. The urbanization process in place is just another way to stop the people from speaking out or even inquiring about their own opinion. Moving everyone into cities is not going to help China expand or grow as much as they need to as a people in the long run. When you change someone into something they're clearly not, they can never aspire to their true potential. The country of China wants to prosper, but contradicts itself because the government is trying to take away a part of life that has been known to man for as long as anyone could probably remember, which is country; the rural lands that have always run across the Earth. The control and power that China is trying to acquire is not coming easy enough to them because they are too independent. They need to let places like the U.S. help build them and inspire them. Also, their plan for complete city life is not moving fast enough. People are unemployed and financially hurt. Even in 2025, people will continue to hurt and regret the decisions made. Sometimes the government can seem cold and unfeeling because they don't take all of the factors into consideration that they need to so they can thrive. Eventually, people need to come out and make decisions that are risky and outside the box to change the direction that their country is being led into. If China does not stop trying to control their people, and push them all into the city rather than the farming country, it could potentially become a place where people would rather die than be who they are. A great example of this is Foxconn. Many children have committed suicide because of the pressure put on them. Unfortunately, China chose the wrong solution. They didn't actually fix the core of the problem. Putting nets up around the buildings stopped some of the deaths, but it doesn't stop the workers or children from feeling so worthless that they shouldn't exist. China needs to make changes for their morality and for their future as a country with a lot of promise and potential. China and all of its people just need to use their power and ability for the right reasons, in the right ways.
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Urbanisation Up Close - Speaking of Medicine

Urbanisation Up Close - Speaking of Medicine | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Jocalyn Clark @jocalynclark discusses the urbanisation of the world’s population and its impact on global health. Image credit: joiseyshowaa, Flickr Undeni

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Urbanisation joins mining and farming as threat to Great Barrier Reef

Urbanisation joins mining and farming as threat to Great Barrier Reef | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
THE battered Great Barrier Reef may yet face its most damaging issue — urban pollution from millions of people.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 31, 2014 6:27 PM

Ecosystems at risk- great releveance to case study or GBR as an ecosystem at risk.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 2, 2014 6:36 PM

Option - marine environments and managementmanagement