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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.

Via Seth Dixon
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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 1:21 PM

The pictures show the deep divide between rich and poor in Mexico. These settlements are built to the point where luxurious condos share a wall with decaying slum housing. The roads do not connect the areas, showing how these places were constructed separately by to distinctly different communities. While the proximity between sections shows that sights, sounds, and smells most likely carry across the two sections, the rich area looks as if it has no idea what lies directly beyond their walls. The fact that the rich areas are literally walled off from the rest of the surrounding area says a lot about the deep economic divides found around the world today.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, October 5, 9:42 AM

This photo is amazing! Not only does it show the great differance between the rich and the poor but it also shows how Mexicos social class exists. It looks like a before and after! The grass really is greener on the otherside.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 9:02 AM

Right away from looking at this picture, you can tell which side is which. I didn't even have to read the article yet to find out where the wealthier people lived and where the not so wealthy lived. The colors stood out the most to me. In the picture on the left, it is clear that this is the not so wealthy part in Mexico. The color is just filled with dark and gloominess, mostly shown in gray. The houses are also pushed very closely together. On the right side, it appears that this is the richer side of Mexico. Although the houses are closer together like the picture on the left, they are colorful. They have firm built roofs and appear to be built and taken care of much better. Something else that gives you the sense of which community is more rich is the cars. There is a whole line of cars in the right picture while in the left picture we see a few here and there. The right picture also illustrates lawns. We slightly see some grass in the left, but it is clearly not as well taken care of as the lawns in the right picture. This picture was done as an advertisement to draw attention to the gap between the two different communities. The campaign goes by the name "Erase the Differences" and hopes to get people to realize the differences in poverty that are right in front of them.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

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Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps

Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
RIO DE JANEIRO — Look at most maps of Rio de Janeiro. The beaches are easy to spot, as are the iconic ocean-front neighborhoods of Copacabana and Ipanema. In the middle is a vast forest.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2013 11:40 AM

A nonprofit organization run by current and former favela residents called Redes da Mare has started the first mapping program to systematically chart out the favelas for municipal governments.  We take for granted what having an address on a named street means in a modern society; it is a portal to public utilities, recognition with businesses and countless other social benefits.  Being left 'off the map' is synonymous with being left behind.  By finding their way on the city maps they are removing some of the social stigma that sought to treat them as if they did not exist.  


Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, mapping

Caterin Victor's comment, January 26, 2013 2:06 PM
Even the shanty-towns are beautiful in Brazil
chris tobin's curator insight, February 21, 2013 3:06 PM

Being left off the map is ludicrous.  It should be surprising how many there are,what they pick for addresses, and population statistics. Hopefully this will also help them to get aid for poverty relief.