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Which NFL Team Are You Stuck Watching Every Sunday?

Which NFL Team Are You Stuck Watching Every Sunday? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Like millions of other Americans, I watch the NFL on a regular basis. However, just like millions of other viewers, most Sundays I am not sure which games will be on my television. For years, the strange geographic structures that underpinned league broadcasts were almost entirely obscured from the average consumer. People would turn on their TVs expecting to see one game only to be disappointed by another.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2015 1:25 PM

The top map is essentially a major market analysis of sports teams and shows to some extent the media hinterlands of America's major cities.  The second map I find even more interesting; all teams are regional, but a select few have larger national followings (if you are a fan of the Packers, Steelers, 49ers or Cowboys and are not from those areas, maybe I can guess your age).  There are many other maps in this interesting sports geography article.  What patterns do you see?  Explanations? 


Tag: sportspatialmapping, regions.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 20, 2015 11:31 AM

unit 1 and 6

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These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How vacant houses trace the boundaries of Baltimore's black neighborhoods.


The map on the left shows one very tiny dot for each person living in Baltimore. White people are blue dots, blacks are green, Asians are red and Hispanics yellow.The map on the right shows the locations of Baltimore City's 15,928 vacant buildings. Slide between the two maps and you'll immediately notice that the wedge of white Baltimore, jutting down from the Northwest to the city center, is largely free of vacant buildings. But in the black neighborhoods on either side, empty buildings are endemic.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, economic, race, poverty, spatial, housing.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 1, 2015 9:37 AM

Unit 7

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, May 24, 2015 9:14 PM

Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use

 

This article is about Sandtown, Baltimore and its shift into a disamenity sector. It explains how this neighborhood, mainly housed by blacks, had a high percentage of vacant houses. The article says that this neighborhood is overrun with poverty, war on drugs and gangs and has the more residents in jail than any other neighborhood. This shows the changing demographics of the city of Baltimore.

 

This relates to unit 7 because it covers the topic of disamenity sectors and changing demographics. It shows reasons for the high levels of poverty and abandoned housing. It also shows the racial spatial distribution of the neighborhood and its correlation to housing and development.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 1:46 AM

This article left me heart broken. The African American community in Baltimore is stuck in a deep poverty cycle, and it cannot seem to escape its impoverished past. Even now, the poverty in the area seems to just be getting worse. The problems of income disparity lead to more problems than just economic; they lead to social and political problems. Social unrest and injustice occurs as a result of the modern white flight. This article arose as a result of the death of Freddie Gray, whose death demonstrates a significant social issue that needs to be addressed: police brutality and the criminal targeting of the African American community. His death stems from the tremendously amounts of disparity in the city. Promoting investment in the inner city would definitely help alleviate the poverty in the area. The problem is getting people to invest.

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Quiz: Can you name a food just by looking at where it comes from?

Quiz: Can you name a food just by looking at where it comes from? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
I map the food, you tell me what it is.

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Gabriel Olson's curator insight, February 13, 2015 2:59 PM

We ought to know something about where our food comes from...

Eden Eaves's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:04 AM

Unit 5

Some  of these maps are easy to guess, such as cotton being grown in the south, but what about others like pigs being raised in the mid-west and North Carolina??? We are so used to having only to make a quick stop at the nearest grocery store to grab our weekly essentials that we don't always think about where it naturally comes from. Also preservatives have come so far as to keep things fresh for long periods of time that where it originates is not a problem because it can be shipped in a refrigerated truck with still time left for it to sit in your fridge for a few days. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:34 PM

This 12 question quiz is a great way to introduce students to spatial patterns of agricultural products in the United States.  Sometimes just knowing regional stereotypes can be helpful, but being able to make an educated guess about where an agricultural product is comes from requires a basic understanding of economic and climate patterns.  This quiz is a good way to test that knowledge and introduce them to these spatial patterns.    

 

Tags: triviaspatial, regions, foodeconomic, food production, agriculture.

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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 2014 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

Richard Thomas's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:52 PM

Despite the gendered overtones of the article (that it's important for men to learn to read a map), this is some good advice, regardless of gender.  The vocabulary and concepts of maps can strengthen spatial cognition and geography awareness.  While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While it intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  So break out a trusty ol' map, but more importantly, be a part of the spatial decision-making process. 


Tags: mapping, spatial, technology, education.

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Central Place Theory

Central Places:Theory and Applications produced by Ken Keller (kellek@danbury.k12.ct.us) adapted from Don Ziegler.


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Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:04 PM

Central Place Theory - This PowerPoint is the best representation of Christaller's Central Place Theory that I've seen! It does a great job at showing its hexagonal layout, along with describing urban hierarchy and sizes, and range that a person will go to buy certain goods.

Cohen Adkins's curator insight, February 6, 2016 3:43 PM

I believe the central place theory is very important for Business owners who want to set up a commercial building because it shows the amount of competition that the business owner would have if they desire to settle somewhere. - C.Adkins

Chelsie Rogers's curator insight, March 7, 2016 4:29 PM

The Central Place Theory is a model that is not used much today in academic geography, but given it's explicitly spatial nature, it is used in many geography curricula (including AP Human Geography) to show systems thinking and spatial patterns.  This powerpoint goes over the main ideas of the theory developed by Walter Christaller as well as some examples.  

 

Tags: APHG, models, spatial. 

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SimCity EDU

SimCity EDU | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
SimCityEDU - Create & Share SimCity Learning Tools

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Jamie Strickland's comment, March 11, 2013 2:36 PM
I played the original when it first came out--it was a lot of fun to watch the city grow and change. I had a colleague that used one of the more recent versions in his land use planning course. This will be interesting to poke around in.
Leslie G Perry's curator insight, March 11, 2013 9:20 PM

It's all about gaming to help them get connected. I heard a story from a colleague today. He said that every year at this school, an veteran would come and talk to the students about the military and World War II but students really didn't get it. So the next year, he had them all play Call of Duty right before the veteran visited the school. He had them storm the beaches of Normandy (on the hardest level). They all failed. The next time the veteran came to speak, they were animated and asking questions about how could they have managed such a feat. 

Seth Dixon's comment, March 12, 2013 4:43 PM
The game is getting more sophisticated: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/02/26/simcity-is-smarter-than-you-even-if-you-re-an-urban-planner.html
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Scale of the Universe

Scale of the Universe | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Everything in the known universe, created by 14-year-old twins.

 

After you follow the link, click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe).  This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels.   This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.  See this on the twins website at: http://htwins.net/scale2/


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Kalin B.'s comment, September 13, 2012 8:11 PM
I've seen this around, and it always reminds me of a fictional pair of glasses that would show you what little a part of the universe you are, causing you to go insane.

Erm, anyway.. Very neat.
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:55 AM
I like to sit and think about how big we think we are, not as just one countrh but as one planet! We think that we are so so big but looking at this scale of the universe it is interesting to see how much bigger things can get AND how small they can get compared to us. So if you think about it this way, we are SO tiny compared to the rest of the universe and if we stopped doing what we are doing now (i.e wars, sickness and natural resources etc.) and work together we would be SO MUCH bigger and as a result of that we would be able to explore more of our world and universe
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:55 AM
I like to sit and think about how big we think we are, not as just one countrh but as one planet! We think that we are so so big but looking at this scale of the universe it is interesting to see how much bigger things can get AND how small they can get compared to us. So if you think about it this way, we are SO tiny compared to the rest of the universe and if we stopped doing what we are doing now (i.e wars, sickness and natural resources etc.) and work together we would be SO MUCH bigger and as a result of that we would be able to explore more of our world and universe
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My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either

My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Ask any teenager for directions and he can pull up Google Maps quicker than you can recite an address. Pretty awesome, right? And I’ll be the first to admit that having a map in my phone that not only tells me where to turn but how long it will take me to get there is pretty amazing. I use it all the time, honestly. But even when I’m zoning out and listening to that soothing voice telling me where to turn, I have a mental picture in my head of her directions. And I never realized that my teenage daughter doesn’t have a map in her head, because she’s never really had to use one. Ever.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.


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Cade Johns's curator insight, August 16, 2015 9:26 PM

I think maps on your phone is great but what about if you get lost and you don't have service on your phone then what are you gonna do?Most young people have never had to read an actual map so most likely they won't be able to find their way back to civilization. CJ

Ethan Conner's curator insight, August 17, 2015 8:56 AM

Many people cannot read maps because of technolagy. This new form of maps are keeping children from the traditional way. Also keeping them from education.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, August 26, 2015 9:50 AM

Although cell phone and technology is helpful, other people still believe in the prideful way. Reading paper maps.

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The Geographic Advantage

The Geographic Advantage | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
We are living in an era of receding glaciers, accelerating loss of species habitat, unprecedented population migration, growing inequalities within and between nations, rising concerns over resource depletion, and shifting patterns of interaction and identity. This website provides 11 geographic investigations aligned to the geographic questions in the NRC Understanding Our Changing Planet report. The report focuses on the future directions in the geographical sciences and how these key questions will guide research to help us understand the planet on which we live.

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Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 20, 2015 6:17 PM

This article by the AAG emphasizes that in order to provide a healthier, more prospering world, we need to do 4 things. These 4 things are: environmental change, promote sustainability, spatial reorganization of the economy and society, and harness technological change. This will allow us to create more long term and sustainable geographic patterns. 

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:02 PM

I really liked this article as it was interactive. I was able to pick out the area of geography I wanted to learn about and then it took me to another page that gave me more in-depth explanations. It was an overall good refresher on different aspects of geography with emphasis on how we react with our environment. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:22 AM

I definitely agree with the website that geography is one of the most important, if not the most important tool in understanding the world today. Geography is not simply just naming and understanding place names, although that is certainly important to geography. Geography is about understanding the social, political, and economic causes and consequences resulting from the nationally and artificially conceived barriers, borders, and places. This is why I think everyone should be required to take AP Human Geography. The classes exposes you to so many of the current events, problems, and implication in society today. As a senior, I thought I had already learned everything I needed to learn in my previous classes, and little did I know that I was dead wrong in my assumption. This classes has singlehandedly taught me many of the problems in the world today, and this class is the most useful class I've ever taken that can be applied to the real world every single day. I'm beyond happy that I chose to take AP Human Geography. I'm grateful for all the information I've learned in this class. But most importantly, I'm most thankful for the endless curiosity this classes has sparked in me to understand the world around me.

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Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps

Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Spatial analysis has always been a hallmark of GIS, the 'numerical recipes' which set GIS apart from other forms of computerized visualization and information management. With GIS we pose questions and derive results using a wide array of analytical tools to help us understand and compare places, determine how places are related, find the best locations and paths, detect and quantify patterns, and even to make spatial predictions."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 7:50 PM

GIS is a key tool in spatial analysis, but it can also be a driving force in using math, science, technology and (yes) geography as interdisciplinary ways of teaching the curriculum.  StoryMaps can be rich with images and videos, but also filled with data at a variety of scales.  ESRI has share a "Maps we love" page with excellent examples of Story Maps and carefully explains WHY these maps work and HOW they were made.  Are you new to using the Analysis tool in ArcGIS Online?  Try this exercise on analyzing flood risk to guide you through some of the steps to learn what is possible for a project of your own.  What stories can you tell in this rich, visual format?  What visual template shown might lend itself best for that sort of project? 


Tagsmapping, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 29, 2014 12:16 PM

 Not only Spatial, even plain geography is very interesting and important,  but.....not everybody understands, and want to...

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Geographic Perspective Matters in Policy Debates

Geographic Perspective Matters in Policy Debates | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"The American policymaking sphere has long been dominated by political scientists and economists. While I have nothing against these disciplines, and acknowledge that they have made important contributions to our public discourse, I am also concerned that we have not always heard the full range of perspectives on important questions of the day.  Geography has a different perspective to offer, and our public discourse is impoverished without it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 13, 2014 10:05 PM

Spatial thinking needs to be infused into many of our public conversations, and geographers collectively need to find ways to be a part of them.

Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 2014 1:05 PM

A great article discussing why geography matters in ongoing discussions about public policy. The spatial perspective is a key thing to remember in any decision-making process.

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 28, 2014 10:59 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the Harm de Blij book "Why Geography Matters" that is assigned for summer reading because it indicates that geography's perspectives matter equally or more so than political science and economics.

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SimCity EDU

SimCity EDU | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
SimCityEDU - Create & Share SimCity Learning Tools

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Jamie Strickland's comment, March 11, 2013 2:36 PM
I played the original when it first came out--it was a lot of fun to watch the city grow and change. I had a colleague that used one of the more recent versions in his land use planning course. This will be interesting to poke around in.
Leslie G Perry's curator insight, March 11, 2013 9:20 PM

It's all about gaming to help them get connected. I heard a story from a colleague today. He said that every year at this school, an veteran would come and talk to the students about the military and World War II but students really didn't get it. So the next year, he had them all play Call of Duty right before the veteran visited the school. He had them storm the beaches of Normandy (on the hardest level). They all failed. The next time the veteran came to speak, they were animated and asking questions about how could they have managed such a feat. 

Seth Dixon's comment, March 12, 2013 4:43 PM
The game is getting more sophisticated: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/02/26/simcity-is-smarter-than-you-even-if-you-re-an-urban-planner.html
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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct place and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

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Sea Level Rise Poses Specific Threat To East Coast Cities

Sea Level Rise Poses Specific Threat To East Coast Cities | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Brace yourselves, East Coasters....

 

Thinking spatially, it's important to remember that not all places will be impacted equally.  Even among coasts, not all spots would receive equal sea level rises when the ocean's systems are dynamic.


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Collin Lewis's comment, August 12, 2012 3:14 PM
I have been to North Carolina and many of the other places mentioned in this article and have seen the damages of the water levels rising. One example of the water rising is a road in North Carolina going to Cape Hatteras that is now completely submerged underwater. There is now a make-shift bridge that runs over the underwater road.
Zach Trafton's comment, August 13, 2012 4:14 PM
I knew that the sea level was rising but I didn't know it was happening so quickly. I think that people living in the hot spot are should take this seriously. When I go to the beach there use to be a lot more beach between the road and ocean. but because of the rising sea level, the land between is becoming shorter and shorter.
Emily Franson's comment, September 2, 2012 3:19 PM
The sea level is rising rapidly and I had no idea how serious it is and how much of an impact it's taking on the world. People living in the hot spot need to realize how serious of a problem this can turn into and that the sea level will have a big effect on the land as time goes by.