FCHS AP HUMAN GEO...
Follow
Find tag "seasonal"
7.9K views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cultural and Historical Geography of Santa Claus

Cultural and Historical Geography of Santa Claus | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A look into Smithsonian's vast archives reveals that Father Christmas tends to get a makeover with every generation that embraces him

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 12, 2014 12:03 PM

The picture archives show the historical evolution behind the cultural representations of Santa Claus.  Additionally this ESRI story map shows some of the regional differences in Santa Claus, showing how the cultural diffusion of this icon of a Christian holiday takes on real local attributes.  I also enjoyed these pictures from the BBC of Christmas around the world.  Merry Christmas to those that celebrate it and a Happy New Year to all.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Pumpkin Geography

Pumpkin Geography | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"During the month of October, I take advantage of the pumpkin harvest to bring hands-on geography to my students.  After spending a month becoming familiar with the location of the seven continents and the major bodies of water, each student is given a pumpkin to turn into a globe. Students paint the entire surface of the pumpkin blue to represent water. Next, they use pushpins to position and trace the outline of each continent onto their pumpkins. They use actual globes as models and are careful to place the continents in the correct hemisphere. Then, they paint and label each continent a different color. They label the major bodies of water and use white paint to represent the North and South Poles."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 22, 2014 8:57 AM

Happy October everyone!  The pictures above (from a friend's website) show how teachers and parents alike can get children involved in a fun craft that will strengthen kids' mental maps--all with a seasonal twist.  If you really love idea of pumpkin globes, you should also see this one.   


Tagsart, K12, fun, seasonal.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:17 AM

Happy October everyone!  The pictures above (from a friend's website) show how teachers and parents alike can get children involved in a fun craft that will strengthen kids' mental maps--all with a seasonal twist.  If you really love idea of pumpkin globes, you should also see this one.  Besides the fun and games here are some resources to teach the geography behind Thanksgiving.     


Tagsart, K12, fun, seasonal.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:14 AM

This is a great use of connecting education and culture. Carving pumpkins is something that most children connect with this season. I think it is an effective strategy to connect these traditions with education. I think its a great way to put a educational spin on a childhood tradition. 

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial components to it.  My wife and I prepared an article for the Geography News Network on Maps101.com that shows the historical and geographic context of the first Thanksgiving and in the memorialization of Thanksgiving as a national holiday (if you don’t subscribe to Maps 101, it is also freely available as a podcast on Stitcher Radio or iTunes).


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 16, 2013 7:52 PM

One of my favorite combinations of maps for Thanksgiving involves the geography of food production and food consumption.  When we start looking at the regional dishes on Thanksgiving plates we can see some great patterns.  This ESRI storymap asks the simple question, where did your Thanksgiving Dinner come From?

 

This StoryMap is a great resource to combine with this New York Times article that shows the regional preferences for the most popular Thanksgiving recipes.  Where are sweet potatoes grown?  Where do people make sweet potato pie for Thanksgiving? 

Plymouth County, MA is heart of only 3 cranberry producing regions and is was also home to the first Thanksgiving.  How has this New England local ecology and traditional food patterns influenced national traditions? 

For these and more Thanksgiving resources on scoop.it, click here.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 17, 2013 6:14 AM

This website is interesting because it gives us the geography of where specific foods in the country are manufactured such as cranberrie sauce, turkeys, sweet potatoes and helps us develop a rich cultural history and earn solidarity of where we come from and the traditions that make us who we are in terms of culinary choices. The original thanksgiving with the early puritan settlers in New England most likely reflected dishes that were synonomous with foods that natives grew and other local items that were family in this area. Now because of industry we to choose foods that have their origin from markets nationwide.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 17, 2013 12:35 PM

Love to see where the traditional American Thanksgiving food comes from.  We have that, but growing up in an all Italian household Thanksgivng was more then Turkey...it had an added Italian flavor.  Start with antipasto that had a prosciutto that would met in your mouth, plus cheeses, muhrooms, other meats, then would come the soup, then the pasta, could be any variety then the Turkey, but you would also have a ham because you never knew who was going to stop by, plus all the trimmings and then finally dessert with Italian cookies and pastires along with the Thanksgivng traditions of pumpkin and apple pies.  We took breaks inbetween courses to watch some football and make room for more food becasue it was all good.  We literally ate all day.  So for us out food came form all over the world.  In a nation of immigrants, we added our own flavor to an American Holiday..and to me whats more American than brining in some of your own hertitage into a holiday..we are after all a "melting pot"

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

St Patrick's Day celebrated around the world – in pictures

St Patrick's Day celebrated around the world – in pictures | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
From Moscow to New York via Vilnius and the pyramids of Egypt, St Patrick's Day is celebrated with parades and a lot of green face paint

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 17, 2013 5:30 PM

Being in Chicago on Saint Patrick's Day one year was the highlight of my trip.  Seeing the river green was truly an impressive sight and the pictures don't quite do it justice.  Today, 34.5 million US residents claimed Irish ancestry in 2011, more than 7 times population of Ireland.

Pedro Arocha Silva's comment, March 18, 2013 10:55 PM
Nice Chicago pic :D
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

GIS Lounge: Thanksgiving Maps

GIS Lounge: Thanksgiving Maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Want to know where your Thanksgiving food comes from? 

 

This provides the geography of holiday food production with links to the data so you can map out the data with GIS (links produced by Western Illinois University). 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
abontempo's comment, January 30, 2012 2:13 PM
This is so interesting! I never really thought about how our thanksgiving meal is so different from others around the world!
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:52 PM

T-giving map stuff...

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Giving Thanks—or Miigwetch

Giving Thanks—or Miigwetch | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Gathered around the Thanksgiving table, Americans tell stories about colonists and Native Americans coming together. But do Native Americans even celebrate Thanksgiving? And what would Native American heritage food look like? This November, With Good Reason takes a look at the indigenous side of a Thanksgiving table.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 25, 2014 2:12 PM

This podcast is a great look at the diverse ways in which a national holiday can be celebrated.  The cultural connections in the podcast are quite rich.  


Tags: Thanksgiving, food, seasonal, folk culture, culture, indigenous.

JebaQpt's comment, December 1, 2014 11:56 PM
For each new morning with its light,
For rest and shelter of the night,
For health and food, for love and friends,
For everything Thy goodness sends.
~RalphWaldoEmerson http://www.thequotes.net/2011/11/thanksgiving-day-quotes/
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Santas Around the World

Santas Around the World | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
This story map was created with the Esri Map Tour application in ArcGIS Online.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 2014 8:10 PM
This was definitely an interesting reading. I believe @Spencer Levesque had a very good point. They all have similar features, but are different in little ways. And who would of thought someone came on New Years too?
Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 2014 10:23 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries precieve Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country perceives him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 2014 10:28 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries perceive Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country precieves him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geography in the News: Pumpkins

Geography in the News: Pumpkins | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Halloween and Thanksgiving are just around the corner and pumpkins are already showing up at roadside stands. Jack o’lanterns, decorative displays and pumpkin pies are the main destinies of most pumpkins in the United States. Elsewhere in the world, however, the pumpkin is nearly exclusively considered a food crop or animal feed."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:25 PM

I have been a long-time fan of pumpkin coffee, and tomorrow I will probably have some with my cousins and family... Some areas of Asia allow consumption of dogs, other areas of the US allow consumption of roadkill, and that is different from what most people in RI are used to... So I guess, it's not really my business what other people and countries do with their pumpkin crops, as long as it doesn't negatively affect other people.  My neighbor has won some prizes, I think 3rd place in RI for largest pumpkin contests, which is pretty cool, because for several months, you can see their pumpkin garden from my backyard.  Those pumpkins are enormous, and made me wonder if there was anything being done to make the modified pumpkins more usable in food.  I know GMOs are a touchy issue, but to feed the starving people around the world, you have to wonder if one pumpkin at 2000 lbs could feed a village of people.  Lots of people that don't like GMOs probably do unhealthy things in other ways, so their huge activism movements really boggle me.  Labeling GMOs is one thing, but stopping genetic modifications seems as controversial as starting them, especially when some people can benefit from them.  Whatever, I guess pumpkins are cool for whatever people want to do with them, including smashing them... this week on RIC's campus I saw a smashed pumpkin.  The only thing that really popped into my head was not "what a waste," or "oh, those delinquents," but rather "that seems fun."  I did assume though, that no one was hurt by the smashing of the pumpkin...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:14 PM

Although you wouldn't think it there are many different countries and specific regions that demonstrate the perfect cropping land and fertilization process to grow pumpkins. Out of the US power house pumpkin growing Illinois is named number 1. Along side California, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvainnia, Mississippi. But lets travel abroad to Africa, now me personally I wouldnt think that there are alot of pumpkin patches in Africa but there are many different places in Africa that pumpkins are grown. SOme of these places are Egypt with (690,000) and then there is South Africa with (378,776). I found these numbers quite interesting because one wouldn't think that there are pumpkin patches in Africa.

Pamela Shields's curator insight, August 29, 2014 10:10 AM

@Danyl †  so inspirational!

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

White Christmas?

White Christmas? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Probability of a white Christmas in U.S.

 

This is not a weather report; we are still too far out to start predicting that with any accuracy.  What this map does show is the statistical probabilities of snow cover thoughout the United States for December 25th based on past climatological data.    


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.