FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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See where women outnumber men around the world (and why)

See where women outnumber men around the world (and why) | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"A new study maps the population gaps between men and women around the world."

 


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Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Cohen Adkins's curator insight, September 8, 2015 4:59 PM

Its amazing how well balanced some countries are with the ratio of men to women how ever some of the 3rd world countries are off balance but not to an extreme.

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Global Refugee Crisis

"This video shows you why the refugees crossing the Mediterranean by boat can't just fly to Europe."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2015 2:30 PM

Not since the end of World War II have there been so many refugees seeking safety.  There are several regional hot spots of political, ethnic and religious turmoil; many are now asking how the global community should response to the worst refugee crisis in generations.


Tags: migration, political, refugees.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, June 19, 2015 9:35 AM

Global population shakeup.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 19, 2015 10:14 AM

Population-refugee,asylum seeker, not internally displaced person. FRQ #3 2015

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What is the future of the world's religions?

According to new Pew Research demographic projections, by 2050 there will be near parity between Muslims (2.8 billion, or 30% of the population) and Christians (2.9 billion, or 31%), possibly for the first time in history. Read more at http://pewrsr.ch/projections.

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Alan Frumkin's curator insight, April 7, 2015 7:11 PM

añada su visión ...

Zeke Robinson's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:06 PM

I think this is very true as the world is already shifting to Islam and losing at Christianity.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:22 PM

This video gives a hypothesis on how the religions are going to look like in 2015. The Pew Research believes Muslim is going to increase, Christianity is going to have a stable pojection, and people with no religion are going to decline.

 

This article relates with Unit 3: Cultural Patterns and Proccesses because it gives a hypothesis of how religions are going to look like in 2015. I was a little surprised about the guess that people with no religion are going to decrease in number. I would that it would increase because as people get busier with life and less time for traditions and holidays, then they will start to have no religion. 

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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


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Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:47 AM

unit 2

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 8:05 PM

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: population, declining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

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Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2

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Will saving poor children lead to overpopulation?

Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world. CC by www.gapminder.org

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:05 AM

Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, demographicsmodels, gapminderdevelopment.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 28, 2014 6:18 PM

A clear explanation of how saving the poor will slow population growth.

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:13 PM

Population growth in an important topic that is connected to economic development.  If you've seen Hans Roslings TED talks, this is an hour-long version of many of the same concepts and data visualizations.  His Gapminder data visualization tool, it is a must see for geography teachers to show the connections between population statistics and developmental patterns--let students see the data.  This is an article that looks at a different factor, arguing that overpopulation isn't the real issue.  
 

Tags: gapminder, population, demographic transition model, development.

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:36 AM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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Population Density

Population Density | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

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If Australia were a street of 100 households | McCrindle Research

If Australia were a street of 100 households | McCrindle Research | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
If Australia were a street of 100 households, what would it look like? There would be a population of 260 people, and a total of 45 dogs, 27 cats and 252 fis...

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dilaycock's curator insight, April 8, 2013 2:30 AM

Published in November, 2012.

Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:23 PM
It's interesting to see the statistics of a whole population boiled down into an imaginary and more approachable community. It was a creative idea and I think it makes the facts of the population easier to understand.
Emily Larsson's comment, September 10, 2013 8:02 PM
I didn't realize how small Australia was compared to India and China. Its amazing when you really think about how society is changing. In the video is said that the average household is getting older by the decade. I have seen a break down like this before of the entire world, where is was only 100 people. Sometime people don't realize that the rest of the world is entirely different that the place that they live.
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Mapping the Anthropocene

Mapping the Anthropocene | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

As follow-up to an earlier post about how we have enter the age of the Anthropocene, this stunning map is a fantastic visual representation of the forces that merit the dawning of a new geologic age.  This map depicts the lights at night, major roads, railways power lines, oversea cables, airline routes and shipping lanes.  It also expands the areas according to population size.  For more on the production of this map, see the Globaia website: http://globaia.org/en/anthropocene/

 


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Countries with the Most Migrants

Countries with the Most Migrants | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

List of the countries with the most migrants in the world as measured by net migration rate.


Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?  


Tags: Migration, population, Immigration, statistics, worldwide, unit 2 population. 


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:04 PM

This is an interesting little chart because it reveals to us which countries have the highest percentage of migrants that make up their general population. Definitely suprised me to see Qatar as the number one on the list, I would have expected the US to be at the top, but it is not even in the top 10!

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:26 PM

This shows the net migration of immigrants. 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, September 30, 2014 4:04 PM

Remember this is based on a % of the total population, and not total #. Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list? 

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Overpopulation, overconsumption – in pictures

Overpopulation, overconsumption – in pictures | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How do you raise awareness about population explosion? One group thought that the simplest way would be to show people

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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:30 PM

Global challenges

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Declining Populations

Declining Populations | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"All over the continent, potential parents have shown reluctance to have more babies. Hence, governments and advocacy groups are becoming increasingly creative about getting their citizens to make babies."

 

Tag: Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 2:18 PM

This is very important for these countries because people are getting older and eventually to keep the country economically, politically, population, socially and most important culturally stable the population needs to rise by birth rates even though it can still rise by immigrations but it would eventually lose its true culture.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:32 PM

After reading such an article, I could not understand why someone would not want to have children, especially with the incentives offered by the governments. Clearly it seems as if Denmark is the most concerned because they take up three out of five of the slots for how Europe is trying to convince its citizens to make more babies. In general, the incentives seem to be very good, good enough for someone to want to have children. In Sweden you get 480 days out of work plus 80% of your previous salary, Denmark says if Danes were successful in conceiving a child while being on a vacation organized by the company, they were eligible to win three years of free diapers and a trip abroad and France pays families monthly allowances to their children who are younger than 20, plus discounts. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 3:01 PM

the fact that these campaigns are necessary in this age where migrants are flooding Europe and the birth rate is declining. its amazing that this is necessary, but with the birthrate declining the only other home to insure their economic system continues to function is to get the migrants working.

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How the Global Population Boom Really Began

How the Global Population Boom Really Began | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The Industrial Revolution gets credit for kicking off the world's human population explosion, but new research suggests we should look further back.

 

“If you dig further in the past," Stutz told Emory University, "the data suggest that a critical threshold of political and economic organization set the stage around the start of the Common Era. The resulting political-economic balance was the tipping point for economies of scale: It created a range of opportunities enabling more people to get resources, form successful families, and generate enough capital to transfer to the next generation.”


Tag: population.


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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, January 3, 2015 7:29 PM

Homo Sapiens evolved around 130,000 to 160,000 ago, so why did it take until 1804 to reach 1 billion and only 195 years to reach 6 billion? The Industrial Revolution is usually agreed upon as the major catalyst for this population boom. However, WHY is the Industrial Revolution given credit for the population boom and  what else could have caused this? Population growth began with cities which in this case refers to any sort of settlement. Food surplus allows for people to do other things than hunt and gather. This allowed  for the creation of population centers, society, hegemonic class systems, and the economy.  As long as their was a food surplus there could be a population surplus. So the better people were at getting/making food, the more the population grew. So the population boom could actually be attributed to the ability to create a food surplus. The agriculture revolution spured this allowing for the domestication of farm animals and primitive  farming equipment. The population to continue to grow. The industrial revolution made these technologies many times better. This allowed for a greater food surplus resulting in a stronger economy  and standard of living which ALL results in ... A FASTER GROWING POPULATION.

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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 2014 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:59 PM

I can definitely see this as a real problem. Both my Uncle and my Great Uncle moved their condos from ones that had numerous steps to climb to the second floor to more elder-friendly options. My Great Uncle even went a step further to move him and his wife to a senior living community, where there food, entertainment, etc. is all provided within an enclosed neighbourhood with other people of their age group. More of these communities that act like oversized retirement homes could be the answer. They give the illusion of suburban living, something the baby boomers liked, while providing the accessibility they need.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:27 PM

APHG- HW Option 1

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U.S. Hispanic and Asian populations growing, but for different reasons

U.S. Hispanic and Asian populations growing, but for different reasons | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Both Hispanics and Asians been among the fastest-growing racial/ethnic groups in recent years, but since 2010, number of Asians have increased at a faster rate.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 27, 2014 10:15 AM

It is often noted that the cultural composition of the United States is undergoing a shift, referred to by some as the "Browning of America."  The story of Asian and Hispanic growth in the United States are occurring simultaneously, which makes many assume that they are growing for the same reasons.  The data clearly shows that this is not the case.  


Tags: migration, USA, ethnicity.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:55 PM

APHG-U2

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 2014 9:46 PM

A very interesting fact, because I thought that Hispanic race had grown rather than Asian race in the last few years but I see that not. Another thing that caught my attention was that the Hispanic  population has  growth due to the Hispanic  birth here in U.S and not because they immigrate to U.S. But in the case of the growth of the Asian population, is because they immigrate. I didn't know that, now I am more  informed.

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Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

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Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 2014 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:53 PM

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates. 

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Yardstick of Wealth

"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in ways we barely understand – often for the better."


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Kibet Koskei's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:19 AM

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Sue Bicknell's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:37 AM

Another fantastic presentation by Rosling

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:27 AM

Rosling does a great job speaking of poverty and population. This would be an awesome text to use in a unit about poverty. This can be incorporated in a history class, economics class, sociology class, even an anthropology class if it is offered in highschools. 

It is a perfect length video that can be used to introduce a writing assignment, a research project, or an in class group assignment. But it also shows the extremety of poor vs. rich. From what I have seen students like to state their opinions about issues like this. Teachers may have to watch out how they introduce this into their topic or discussion, but it is a worthwhile source to use. 

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Should we be worried?


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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 21, 2013 4:58 AM
Our current predicament in terms of resource depletion, pollution and climate change is mainly due to the industrialized lifestyle of the minority of the world population. Obviously, that's not a result of overpopulation per se.

However, population growth stops when living standards rise. We can't stabilize at 10 billion unless all 10 billion enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Given that even our current resource use is unsustainable, overpopulation is a real issue.
Hongsheng Li's curator insight, September 22, 2013 11:18 PM

人口资源环境承载力

人口过度 or 消费过度

Blake Welborn's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:49 PM

This fits in well with our population chapter now as this is warning of over population. As the population increases so does need for food, which increases global agriculture and pollution

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In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
One-child policy leaves some parents childless, hopeless and facing financial ruin in old age.

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jacob benner's comment, September 14, 2013 5:11 PM
China is overpopulated and it its becoming a problem, but by forcing parents to only have one child is leading to other problems. The childless parents describe there life to be empty and full of depression and without their child they are running into financial issues. Most of the time it is to late for the parents to have another child.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:43 PM

I understand the issues China is having with their large population but the one-child policy hurts the average family. Problems occur when a family can only have one child. If anything were to happen to that child, whether he/she dies young, runs away or gets thrown in prison. That can leave the parents vulnerable later in life. When the parents become elderly they may not have a child to take care of them. China must find another way to control their population. 

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:04 PM

China's one-child policy has had a greater effect than slowing population growth and decreasing the labor force. Another widespread problem for parents obeying this rule is the loss of their only child and the devastation it brings due to the cultural importance of family in China. Ancestors are greatly respected and descendents mark a great life. After parents retire they rely on their children for support and their needs. When they do not have a child anymore, their whole life derails and they spend the rest of their days with a broken family that can never quite heal. In many cases, the parents are then too old to have another child and their life simply falls apart. Protests have been made in the past for similar situations, but the Chinese government has not yet fulfilled its promises to provide greater assistance to these parents or to change their policy.

 

This article relates to population and migration through the population policy of China and its drastic effects on family life and parents. This policy would be classified as anti-natalist because of its promotion of smaller families with less children. It discourages having children.

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If Australia were a street of 100 households | McCrindle Research

If Australia were a street of 100 households | McCrindle Research | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
If Australia were a street of 100 households, what would it look like? There would be a population of 260 people, and a total of 45 dogs, 27 cats and 252 fis...

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dilaycock's curator insight, April 8, 2013 2:30 AM

Published in November, 2012.

Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:23 PM
It's interesting to see the statistics of a whole population boiled down into an imaginary and more approachable community. It was a creative idea and I think it makes the facts of the population easier to understand.
Emily Larsson's comment, September 10, 2013 8:02 PM
I didn't realize how small Australia was compared to India and China. Its amazing when you really think about how society is changing. In the video is said that the average household is getting older by the decade. I have seen a break down like this before of the entire world, where is was only 100 people. Sometime people don't realize that the rest of the world is entirely different that the place that they live.
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Japan's Geographic Challenge

Stratfor examines Japan's primary geographic challenge of sustaining its large population with little arable land and few natural resources. For more analysi...

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
Unlike other larger, more geographically diverse countries, Japan is faced with the problem of a general lack of farmable land and natural resources. The fact that the country is itself an island does not make things any easier for it in an economic sense. The way the country is divided up also makes for a difficult political situation, as mountain ranges create division, and therefore, political disunity.
The proximity of the Korean peninsula and China to Japan is also important to examine. Whenever Japan wishes to acquire natural resources and other economically beneficial materials, Korea is the conduit through which Japan tends to invade the mainland, usually China. Because of this, we can see how Japan’s geographic location may cause strained relationships with its neighbors, both politically and economically. Alienating two of its closest neighbors would clearly be a disastrous move for Japan, but it may be seen as necessary due to its unfortunate geographic location.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:31 PM

It would make sense to me that for a place like Japan to sustain itself successfully, it would have to have some help from other areas with more resources.  Again with the concept- people don't choose to be born, or where they are born... To be born in Japan is as unchosen by that person as it would be in any other country.  I don't think people should have to pay for resources that they do not have available, especially because they are on an island/island chain that simply doesn't have what they need.  I am really repulsed by the bartering system because of absolute indication of beyond excessive surplus and profit and greed and all that garbage that humanity reeks of.  Yeah some people are happy, but we could be completely unburdened of all negativity if we banded together to rid the world of negativity itself.  I know that Japan would be happy to receive everything that they need for no cost, but I also know that many people would be willing to work, and more willing to work, if they didn't have expenses to pay for... it would really be serving their life's purpose as a component of humankind if they worked to help others, rather than to pay their monthly rent.  I don't have a clue how I would go about organizing a movement to transform this idea into a reality, but I'll work on that.  In the mean time, I would advise supranationalism for Japan, and hope that with the alliance of other countries, they can band together and make deals that work for the greater good of their country, population, and the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 10:58 AM

This short video did a great job in explaining why Japan became expansionist in the decades leading up to WW II.  The mountainous nature of the islands and lack of arable land challenges Japan to provide food for its people.  To understand Japan you must understand her geography, this helps to understand why a country acted the way it did in the past and can be a predictor of future actions. 

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Countries with the Most Migrants

Countries with the Most Migrants | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

List of the countries with the most migrants in the world as measured by net migration rate.


Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?  


Tags: Migration, population, Immigration, statistics, worldwide, unit 2 population. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:04 PM

This is an interesting little chart because it reveals to us which countries have the highest percentage of migrants that make up their general population. Definitely suprised me to see Qatar as the number one on the list, I would have expected the US to be at the top, but it is not even in the top 10!

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:26 PM

This shows the net migration of immigrants. 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, September 30, 2014 4:04 PM

Remember this is based on a % of the total population, and not total #. Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?