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Visualizing Time and Space

Visualizing Time and Space | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, July 17, 8:44 PM

VISUALIZANDO TIEMPO Y ESPACIO

sriddle geo's curator insight, July 24, 9:04 AM

Once again the educator in me is at work.  My little girl is asking me all the time , "If it's day here is it night on the other side of the world?"  Now I can show her.

Cory Erlandson's curator insight, July 24, 9:48 AM

Great spatial representation of time and time zones, which is a weirdly fascinating topic for my students.

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Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas

Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Thirteen years after the Bamian Buddhas were blasted into rubble, opinion is split on whether to leave them as is, rebuild them, or make copies of them.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, March 28, 5:43 PM

Protecting significant landscapes

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 5:17 PM

This video starts by talking about the issue at hand of who should recieve this specific historical site. The video and article overlap in talking about the division between which country should be entitiled to their ancestors Buddahs. This is an extremely important issue at hand the resolotion is crucial to the countries getting along again.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 3:31 PM

It is sad that the Taliban would destroy such beautiful monuments but I don't think it is possible to rebuild them. It would not be a matter of gluing together pieces laying around, the statues would have to be completely recarved. I do not think that could be considered a reconstruction, more like a completely new item. The history would not be there.

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


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Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 12:32 PM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the origins of each religion. Also, it shows the various relationships between religions. 

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This shows how a lot of religions are interconnected, and even if people think two religions are completely different, they might have similar roots, just like languages.

 

Graham Shroyer's religion: This relates to key issue 1 because it shows where religions originated and how they are all connected, like judaism and christianity.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This is relevant to Key Issue # 1 because it identifies the origions and relationships of the major world religions of today. These religious branches clearly show the relationships between majorly and minorly practiced religions.


Rishi Suresh:  This shows how, similiar to languages, many religions come in families and have distinct connections between them. 

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 4:42 AM

fascinating infographic on world religions.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:06 PM

The immense tree of world religions is presented as a graphic to tell connections of world religions and how far they've broken and changed.

The movement of ideas and people have helped caused these breaks in the religion by bringing ideas to new people, mixing with the present culture, and going further from the hearth of the religion.

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Scale of the Universe

Scale of the Universe | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Everything in the known universe, created by 14-year-old twins.

 

After you follow the link, click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe).  This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels.   This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.  See this on the twins website at: http://htwins.net/scale2/


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Kalin B.'s comment, September 13, 2012 8:11 PM
I've seen this around, and it always reminds me of a fictional pair of glasses that would show you what little a part of the universe you are, causing you to go insane.

Erm, anyway.. Very neat.
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:55 AM
I like to sit and think about how big we think we are, not as just one countrh but as one planet! We think that we are so so big but looking at this scale of the universe it is interesting to see how much bigger things can get AND how small they can get compared to us. So if you think about it this way, we are SO tiny compared to the rest of the universe and if we stopped doing what we are doing now (i.e wars, sickness and natural resources etc.) and work together we would be SO MUCH bigger and as a result of that we would be able to explore more of our world and universe
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:55 AM
I like to sit and think about how big we think we are, not as just one countrh but as one planet! We think that we are so so big but looking at this scale of the universe it is interesting to see how much bigger things can get AND how small they can get compared to us. So if you think about it this way, we are SO tiny compared to the rest of the universe and if we stopped doing what we are doing now (i.e wars, sickness and natural resources etc.) and work together we would be SO MUCH bigger and as a result of that we would be able to explore more of our world and universe
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Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, June 15, 8:58 AM

Amazing.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 11:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 9:33 AM

unit 1

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How to Read a (Good) Map

How to Read a (Good) Map | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Just as you shouldn’t trust everything you read or see on television, you should never blindly trust information just because it is on a map. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. Just as there are no unbiased arguments, there are no unbiased maps."


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John Slifko's curator insight, November 23, 2013 5:09 PM

Map skills are vital in the study of democratic place and space. 

YEC Geo's curator insight, November 24, 2013 4:44 PM

Good advice.

Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, November 26, 2013 1:09 AM

Exercise 14 :

 

Read the news and answer the questions:

 

a.What is the news talking about ?

b. There are two maps.Maps that is down has these questions ( Answer them ) :

Who made the map?What is the purpose of the map? That is, what is the map attempting to communicate?Who is the intended audience? (It is important to remember that the map may not have been designed for you, but a more specialized audience.)Does the map effectively achieve its communication goals? Does it present an interesting story or argument?

c.Sum up the news ( five sentences in english )

d.Choose another map ( of Internert  if you want ) and answer the questions 1,2,3 i 4. Add the map.

 

Send by moodle.Good luck¡

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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


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Ricardo Salaya Monsell's comment, November 5, 2012 1:31 PM
Although I do not think they do to "trick", it is true that confuses many people and makes them believe in a world disproportionate. (Apologies for my terrible google-English)
Laurence Cuffe's curator insight, August 1, 2013 4:46 AM

While size is not every thing, and Ireland seems to have returned to the UK, This is an image worth discusing in Class.

Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 10:10 AM

Just a reminder

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Why should I be interested in Geography?

A video made by David Lambert et al showing why Geography is a key subject and the importance of understanding it in the context of our modern world.

 

This is a creative video that promotes geo-literacy.  It is an excellent way to kick off a new school year if you are looking for a 'hook' to demonstrate the importance of geography to students today.  Other materials of this nature can be found on this website under the tag 'geo-inspiration' which is accessible here: http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education?tag=geo-inspiration

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Lydia Blevins's comment, September 2, 2012 12:33 PM
I didn't realize how important geography is. It seems very fascinating to learn about geography and how it has so much to do with the future and how our world keeps changing. I can't wait to learn about it in class.
Haley Wayland's comment, September 3, 2012 12:24 AM
This video really gave me a better idea of what this class will teach me and give me more knowledge about. I never really understood the definition of geography and why it was so important. It really seems like an interesting class and I'm very interested.
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:11 PM
This really shows the importance of geography and how much we have not payed attention to how much has changed