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27 stunning satellite images that will change how you see our world - Geoawesomeness

27 stunning satellite images that will change how you see our world - Geoawesomeness | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"The images come from the amazing book called “Overview: A New Perspective of Earth”. that just hit the stores around the world. The book is a stunning and unique collection of satellite images of Earth that offer an unexpected look at humanity, derived from the wildly popular Daily Overview Instagram account followed by almost 0.5 million people."

 

Hagadera, seen here on the right, is the largest section of the Dadaab Refugee Camp in Northern Kenya and is home to 100,000 refugees. To cope with the growing number of displaced Somalis arriving at Dadaab, the UN has begun moving people into a new area called the LFO extension, seen here on the left. Dadaab is the largest refugee camp in the world with an estimated total population of 400,000.


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Can You Guess Where You Are in 60 Seconds?

Can You Guess Where You Are in 60 Seconds? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Can you guess where we are taking you today? Here's a clue: This city's name translates to "where the river narrows."

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 22, 2015 10:30 PM

There is a delightfully simple premise to National Geographic video's newest series: after seeing scenes from the cultural and physical landscapes of a place can you guess where in the world it is?  You can find more resources about this unnamed country (no cheating) here.   


Tags: images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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Over population, over consumption - in pictures

Over population, over consumption - in pictures | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"How do you raise awareness about population explosion? One group thought that the simplest way would be to show people in pictures the impact of population, pollution and consumption."


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SRA's curator insight, April 14, 2015 8:16 PM

Jordan Linhart


It is absolutely astounding to me how we are so continually growing and expanding as a human race. What's more astounding to me is how quickly we are depleting and wasting all of the resources we have been given. Don't get me wrong, I was aware there were 7 pushing 8 billion of us on the planet, but growing up in the suburbs I wasn't as aware of it as I could have been. Ignorance is bliss, right? It breaks my heart to see the clearing of beautiful forests, the once turquoise water of Haiti filled with trash, and the death of animals that accidentally stumbled upon our waste. If we as humans don't start taking care of our planet, there won't be any where left for us to over populate, or even populate for that matter.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 7:56 PM

Unit 6

These eye opening photos paint a perfect picture of what the world will be like in years to come if we keep living the way we do. There are pictures of trash waves, extreme deforestation, hill-side slums, thousands of fields of oil wells, and overwhelming crowds of people.  

Angela Muster's curator insight, February 21, 2016 12:02 PM

It is important to see pictures like this one to help visualize just how much population, pollution, and consumption are effecting our world. Awareness is vital for change.

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Human Landscapes of Canada

Human Landscapes of Canada | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Canada is a massive country, yet it has one of the lowest population densities in the world. Despite this, Canadians have made a wide impact on their land, much of it visible from aerial and satellite photography. Hydroelectric facilities, roads, mines, farms, ports, resource exploration, logging, canals, cities, and towns have altered much of the landscape over the years.

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Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 23, 2015 1:02 AM
http://www.bharatemployment.com/
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 2015 11:20 AM

Un vrai plaisir

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:28 PM

This shows how even small populations can make a big impact on the world from the changes in urbanization.

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4 simple steps to ensure you'll never, ever be tricked by an internet hoax again

4 simple steps to ensure you'll never, ever be tricked by an internet hoax again | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
You're too smart to share this nonsense

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 14, 2014 8:25 AM

Many students today are digital natives and teachers often assume that students understand how to 1) find, 2) evaluate and 3) vett online resources in a critical manner.  To read more about assessing geographic-specific resources online, see this article here. 


Tags: social media.

magnus sandberg's curator insight, November 24, 2014 9:07 AM

I would perhaps replace some of these four points with others. But that is not the most important, as any steps taken will raise awarness, and that is what we want.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, November 25, 2014 3:52 AM

Well, I guess we have come across incidents of Phishing and Spam e-mails? Most of these are scams that are set to draw out some money from you. Some might ask for your bank account details. 

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Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:12 AM

These images may be very useful for teaching the DCI's under the Human Impact topic.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, August 11, 2014 6:48 PM

Is this evidence of homgeniziation of landscapes?

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:11 PM

People change landscapes. This is a great resource available as an iPad App also Called Burtynsky Water. 

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Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 2014 11:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:33 AM

unit 1

Sally Spoon's curator insight, June 2, 2015 4:01 PM

Really cool to look at. Interesting to use as writing starters.

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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 2014 8:35 AM

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 2014 1:21 PM

The pictures show the deep divide between rich and poor in Mexico. These settlements are built to the point where luxurious condos share a wall with decaying slum housing. The roads do not connect the areas, showing how these places were constructed separately by to distinctly different communities. While the proximity between sections shows that sights, sounds, and smells most likely carry across the two sections, the rich area looks as if it has no idea what lies directly beyond their walls. The fact that the rich areas are literally walled off from the rest of the surrounding area says a lot about the deep economic divides found around the world today.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:02 AM

Right away from looking at this picture, you can tell which side is which. I didn't even have to read the article yet to find out where the wealthier people lived and where the not so wealthy lived. The colors stood out the most to me. In the picture on the left, it is clear that this is the not so wealthy part in Mexico. The color is just filled with dark and gloominess, mostly shown in gray. The houses are also pushed very closely together. On the right side, it appears that this is the richer side of Mexico. Although the houses are closer together like the picture on the left, they are colorful. They have firm built roofs and appear to be built and taken care of much better. Something else that gives you the sense of which community is more rich is the cars. There is a whole line of cars in the right picture while in the left picture we see a few here and there. The right picture also illustrates lawns. We slightly see some grass in the left, but it is clearly not as well taken care of as the lawns in the right picture. This picture was done as an advertisement to draw attention to the gap between the two different communities. The campaign goes by the name "Erase the Differences" and hopes to get people to realize the differences in poverty that are right in front of them.

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Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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Humour in the steppes of Mongolia

Humour in the steppes of Mongolia | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
I can´t stop smiling from a photo I stumbled upon on the facebook page of Nomaden (a Norwegian travel store) – I just love it! I tried to find the source of the photo, but no luck. I found it sprea...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 2013 12:39 PM

I think this is my new litmus test for potential friends.  If this picture from Mongolia doesn't bring a smile to your face, I just don't think that we can be friends.  If anyone can find the original source (or a hi-res version), I'd love to hear about it.  

chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 1:33 PM
Great happy photo. This is a possible National Geographgic photo
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Inside an Amazon Warehouse


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 4:07 PM


It is amazing how big this warehouse is. This warehouse must be a couple of acres because amazon is a big company that mostly everyone in the world buys from. it is also amazing how organized they are with all the inventory they get. Amazon is a great company that is helping people gets jobs to help improve there lives and also the economy in which is struggling to get back on it knees. I wonder were amazon has found this warehouse because there are not so many that have this much space. The workers must have golf carts to get around from one spot to the other. Amazon keep up the good work.

 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:45 AM

Online shopping is a great way to get your holiday gifts or just to regularly shop. By online shopping we do not have to go to the mall and walk around in all these different stores. What most people do not realize is when we online shop our orders are being processed somewhere and it is usually in big warehouse buildings. These buildings require a lot of space to hold all of a stores merchandise. 

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:45 AM

Think back to our materials economy system.

Where do images like this fit?

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Life in Chechnya

Life in Chechnya | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Photojournalist Diana Markosian spent the last year and half covering Russia's volatile North Caucasus region.

 

These 33 photos are arranged to tell the cultural story of life in Chechnya, especially the life of young women coming of age in the aftermath of the war.  As the architecture of this mosque suggests, the influence of traditional Islamic values and Russian political authority have greatly shaped the lives of the Chechen people.


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:24 PM

These pictures show many examples to how life in Chechnya for women is very different for women in the United States. We can see that these woman take part in similar day to day activities, but in very different ways. This is why their lives overall are much different than ours.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:28 PM

These photos show the culture of Chechnya. I found them very effective at mixing the environmental and cultural aspects of the area in these pictures. The one where two young people are on a date in a barren snow covered park sitting on opposites sides of the bench because close physical contact is forbidden before marriage. Although the school gym shows how women have to be dressed modestly even when they are exercising. 

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 10, 2015 7:33 PM

A picture says a thousand words.  I saw and learned more through these photos than I could of in any article, because you can really see what it's like there.  Authors and journalists can write and write about the facts and the people and the places, but they'll never really be able to show you, not the way pictures like these can.  The pictures of all these people show you what it's like to be there, how they live, what they do, their culture, beliefs, and ways of life. It's one thing to read about how strict rules for women are, but it's another to see those rules in action, like in gym class, and on dates.  We hear these ideas about countries who are strict with women, but can't really see what it would be like because we don't have that in the U.S., but these pictures make you feel it, not just think it.

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82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.

 

This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.


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Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 8:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:49 AM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:51 AM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
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The Environmental Cost of Consumption

The Environmental Cost of Consumption | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Environmental artist J Henry Fair captures the beauty and destruction of industrial sites to illustrate the hidden impacts of the things we buy – the polluted air, destroyed habitats and the invisible carbon heating the planet

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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 30, 2016 6:28 PM
Photographic essay illustrates the impacts of human use of resources. The beautiful images illustrate the extreme impact on the environment.
Sally Egan's curator insight, October 30, 2016 6:30 PM
Photographic essay illustrates the impact of human activity on environments.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 16, 2016 5:37 PM

Production and consumption - interconnections and consequences 

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Political Symbolism in the Religious Landscape

This is a great juxtaposition of communal identities. Before becoming a part of Canada, this was the Cathedral of St. James. As a part of the British Empire, places such as Victoria Square became a part of the Montreal landscape. In what appears to me as a symbolic strike back against the British Monarchy's supremacy, this Cathedral is renamed Marie-Reine-du-Monde (Mary, Queen of the World). The fact that the Hotel Queen Elizabeth is looming overhead only heightens the tensions regarding whose queen reigns supreme; this isn't the real issue. The dueling queens served as a proxy for tensions between British political control and French cultural identity in Quebec several generations ago.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2015 4:43 PM

I was recently in Montreal; my last few Instagram posts aren't the prettiest pictures of my time in Canada.  I tried to select images that represented geographic concepts and would be the things I'd mention if we were on a walking tour of the city. 


TagsCanadasocial media, urban, economic, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga

First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The first photographs have emerged of a newly formed volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean after three men climbed to the peak of the land mass off the coast of Tonga. Experts believe a volcano exploded underwater and then expanded until an island formed. The island is expected to erode back into the ocean in a matter of months.


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:17 AM

A new one mile island of the coast of Tonga in Oceania west coast of Australia. A volcano exploded underwater, turning lava in rock and pushing through the surface of the ocean to expose a new island. Three men have scaled the peak of the mountain to date. The men say the surface was still hot and the green lake in the crater smelt strongly of sulfur.

                This is great example of geography constantly undergoing changes and new looks and features. Officials say that this island will be eroded away within the next month so they will not even name it I wonder how many islands like this has happened to, or if inhabitants went to live there then the next day there home is underwater. This is another great example of plate tectonic and active under sea forces that we do not see with our eyes, and what most people do not think of on a daily basis, but is working on a daily basis, constantly changing geography and our world. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 9:34 PM

I just find this fascinating.  History is excellent to study but so is the watching history in the making.  This volcanic island formation off the coast of Tonga is a modern day phenomenon which will one day be history.  Some people predict it will erode back into the water but some others think it will be able to last longer.  Either way stuff like this is pretty cool to watch and study while it is happening before your very own eyes.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:20 PM

This is pretty cool that a new island is being formed, due to a volcano that erupted under water. I am sure there are many more in other places, but it is a new opportunity for life, development and travel. Although since it is new, obviously now would not be a good time because you do not want a volcano erupting on people, that would not be an ideal situation. Although, I hope to one day be able to travel to this new island to check it out. 

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Dramatic Confluences

Dramatic Confluences | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Confluences occur wherever two streams come together. If the gradient is low (i.e., nearly level) and the properties of the two streams are very different, the confluences may be characterized by a dramatic visible distinction as the mixing occurs only slowly."

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.


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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 7, 2015 5:47 AM

Wonderful pictures of rivers confluences

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What Does Earth Look Like?


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MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:18 AM

Mapping and Satellite Imagery

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video covers various topics important to mapping and satellite imagery (and alesson from an APHG teacher on how to use this video with other resources).  There is so much more to the world and space than what we can see see.  Chromoscope, referenced in the video, simulates other forms of energy on the electromagnetic spectrum besides just visible light.  This type of information is at the core of the science behind all of our satellite imagery.  This video also covers many map projection issues and highlights online resources to understand map distortion including:

Google’s Mercator Map PuzzleJason Davies’ interactive map projection websiteInteractive Gnomonic Projectionand the military's live rendering of what the Earth looks like right now.  
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Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 2014 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 2014 7:07 AM

add your insight...

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Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline

Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Beaches are dynamic, living landscapes. The coast off of Chatham, Massachusetts, provides a prime example of beach evolution.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2014 11:52 PM

To quote coastal geologist Robert Oldale, "Many people view coastal erosion as a problem that needs to be addressed and, if possible, prevented.  However, storm and wave erosion along the shore of Cape Cod has been going on for thousands of years and will likely continue for thousands of years more. It is a natural process that allows the Cape to adjust to rising sea level. Erosion is only a peril to property. If we build on the shore, we must accept the fact that sooner or later coastal erosion will take the property away.”


Tagscoastal, remote sensing, mappingerosion, landscape.

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, June 7, 2014 1:16 PM
Všetko sa mení...
Sam Burden's curator insight, June 16, 2014 7:40 AM

The NASA Earth Observatory is a teaching tool used to assist educators in teaching students about the environmental, including natural hazards with visualizations depicting the date and time these vast changes in the climate occurs. There are multiple global maps which  depict data over a period of time which can be used as a tool to see the effects of global warming it’s the implications on the environment on a global scale. Animations, videos and side by side images are also available to teachers to show how sustainable choices or designs can influence our environment. I really enjoyed looking at all of the real-world images on this site and it opened my eyes to how creating a more sustainable environment could influence our world on a global scale. 

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Cultural Syncretism

Cultural Syncretism | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:39 AM

I found this image on social media from a great geography teacher (link to his site--looking for APHG group activities?  Try this).  This picture taken at the Jewish Community Center (JCC) in Memphis, TN shows an intrguing linguistic combination that I had never imagined before.  This is referred to as cultural syncretism, where two or more cultures or cultural traits combine together to make something new.  Globalization and migration are making more cultural combinations than we've ever seen before in this human mosaic we call home.


Tags: language, culture, the South, APHG, religion, landscape.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:01 AM

Interesting 


Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:02 PM

This was taken in Memphis, TN. I liked how it mixes the religion with the surrounding culture and dialect, really interesting and shows that people can have the same religion and different backgrounds. 

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Humour in the steppes of Mongolia

Humour in the steppes of Mongolia | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
I can´t stop smiling from a photo I stumbled upon on the facebook page of Nomaden (a Norwegian travel store) – I just love it! I tried to find the source of the photo, but no luck. I found it sprea...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 2013 12:39 PM

I think this is my new litmus test for potential friends.  If this picture from Mongolia doesn't bring a smile to your face, I just don't think that we can be friends.  If anyone can find the original source (or a hi-res version), I'd love to hear about it.  

chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 1:33 PM
Great happy photo. This is a possible National Geographgic photo
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Flag Food

Flag Food | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:02 PM

Now here's an interesting activity for students!

Mark Slusher's curator insight, February 9, 2013 8:46 AM

Now THIS is geographical food for thought! Talk about conquering a nation!

Emily Larsson's comment, September 10, 2013 8:15 PM
I love that! It's so creative. Whoever came up with the idea to do this as an advertisement for the international food festival did a great job. They all look so delicious. Food festivals are a great way to experience other cultures.
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NatGeo on Instagram

NatGeo on Instagram | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

I'm not a photographer, so Instagram isn't one on of my preferred social media platforms.  However, since National Geographic is world renowned for their images, this is a perfect outlet to share more images that wouldn't fit into their articles or other collections.  According to their Social Media expert, this foggy image of NYC is their most viewed image on Instagram. 


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Ingrid Dabringer’s Map Paintings: Finding Whimsy in Geography

Ingrid Dabringer’s Map Paintings: Finding Whimsy in Geography | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This is a great gallery of clever artwork that puts the "art" in cartography (The Earth without art is just "eh"). 


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