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One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 12:42 AM

I find it extremely disturbing that the Han Chinese are using means of violence and propaganda to suppress a group of people who are simply try to maintain their own way of living. Because of the powerful connections and dominance China has in the world, no country is standing up for the people of the area. This article just demonstrates how territoriality can be so hard to define, especially when there are numerous centrifugal forces that are driving the people of an area away from one another. While China believes that the area is theirs, the Uygurs do not identify with the predominant Han Chinese who live in China, so the Uygurs would like to form their own sovereign territory and area, free of the oppression of the Chinese government.

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 10:58 AM

In China, the westernmost region of Xinjiang, is called  Eastern Turkistan by the people who have lived there for centuries. Because of its geographic location, this area has a unique culture that is influenced heavily by central Asia but has little connection to China culturally. Recently, the region was found to be rich in resources and many Chinese moved there for economic gain, but in the process have made the indigenous people, the Uygur, the minority. Ethnic conflict followed and the Chinese government has taken action by enforcing laws and creating propaganda that portrays the Uygur as the enemy and restricts their rights and, specifically, their religious freedom.


This article relates to political organization of space by a boundary that connects a region to a country with which it shares few cultural ties. In the process, political conflict ensued and the area clearly demonstrates an issue to be resolved and a governments violation of rights.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 26, 5:59 PM

Unit 4

The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, such as this. 

This territory is newer, being part of China since 1949, it was meant to be a buffer zone for the Han Chinese from their powerful neighbors.

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France to redraw nation's map to save money

France to redraw nation's map to save money | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"France's administrative regions — Normandy, Alsace, Burgundy, etc. — have long been part of the identity of citizens of this diverse country. Now, merging some of them is seen as a logical way to save money on bureaucracy, and the French support it — as long as it's someone else's turf."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 2014 1:04 PM

How countries identify smaller administrative regions is crucial to understanding both how they are governed, and how these regions impact cultural differences.

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 2014 10:18 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the theme of redistricting and political reapportionment because it involves the redrawing of geographic boundaries within a country in order to facilitate a certain political and economic outcome.

Joy Kinley's curator insight, June 16, 2014 3:28 PM

It is amazing that people are all for redrawing and redistricting until it impacts them.  This is a touchy subject in the United States with some small towns and communities merging even though they only have decades of identity not centuries.  If these merges happen in France I see that there will be many strikes and protests and when it is over everyone still would maintain what they would call their "real identity" not what France gave them.