FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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Russia and the Curse of Geography

Russia and the Curse of Geography | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Want to understand why Putin does what he does? Look at a map.

 

As things stand, Putin, like Russian leaders before him, likely feels he has no choice but to at least try to control the flatlands to Russia’s west. So it is with landscapes around the world—their physical features imprison political leaders, constraining their choices and room for maneuver. These rules of geography are especially clear in Russia, where power is hard to defend, and where for centuries leaders have compensated by pushing outward.


Via Seth Dixon
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Sarah Cannon's curator insight, November 25, 2015 9:41 AM

The majority of politicians around the world, from what I've seen through debates and rallies are fabricated speeches by politicians for the outcome of gaining more votes. I personally don't trust any politician. When it comes to power, politicians will do what ever it takes to use their power and make it stronger. Of course each politician wants their community and their country to be successful and grand. In this post it looks like Putin wants to control lands in Russia's west because he see's potential and possibilities for his country.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:11 PM

This reminds me of the reason Russia fought Afganistan because it wanted to expand its borders especially if Russia could get control of the Wakhan corridor

Diana Morey's curator insight, February 11, 2016 9:24 AM

good reading for political geography

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This Map Shows Why The Battle For 'Ukraine's Soul' Is So Pivotal

This Map Shows Why The Battle For 'Ukraine's Soul' Is So Pivotal | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The tug-of-war for Ukraine.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 2014 12:26 AM

This infographic gives an idea of why Russia is so invested in Ukraine. The energy infrastructure built during the Soviet era runs almost entirely through Ukraine. A significant amount of gasoline consumed in Europe comes from Russia via Ukraine, while over 2/3rds of all the gas Russia exports to the EU goes through Ukraine. This puts Ukraine in a position of power, but the country itself is divided between the East and West making siding with the EU or Russia difficult. These are lasting effects of the Soviet era.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 11:28 AM

Besides the very intense cultural and political split that exists in Ukraine and the conflict as a whole, one of the key factors in this situation is gas.  This infographic shows that both Ukraine and the EU gets their gas from Russia, and Ukraine is the area which the gas lines flow through.  As soon as many people in Ukraine showed interest in joining the EU, Russia reminded Ukrainians and the world of this fact

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 2:51 PM

The tug-of-war over Ukraine's gas lines not only creates political and cultural divides but also a lot of tension. Ukraine has power in its gas lines because it has a resource that is valuable and others need.