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The Invasion of America

The Invasion of America | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations (above is a static image of the map; visit the map's page to play with its features).


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 8:13 AM

In the past I've shared maps that show the historic expansion of the United States--a temporal and spatial visualization of Manifest Destiny.  The difference with this interactive is that the narrative focuses on the declining territory controlled by Native Americans instead of the growth of the United States.  That may seem a minor detail, but how history is told shapes our perception of events, identities and places.

 

Tags: USA, historicalmapping, visualization

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 9:25 AM

unit 1 Perception and bias of maps

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, June 24, 2:51 AM

This will likely resonate with 'first peoples' everywhere

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Human Development Index variation

Human Development Index variation | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Here's how the United States looks when it is measured on the county level by the same standards used to rank countries by the UN, the Human Development Index.  Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates." 


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steve smith's curator insight, March 26, 12:53 PM

A fantastic resource for development studies.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 26, 3:57 PM

Regional patterns?

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 26, 6:18 PM

A WHO map of what life in the U.S. is like demonstrates the role of urbanization and heavily population regions for defining where U.N.'s Human Development Index scores are highest.

Three of the metrics pertain primarily to education.  The fourth is a measure of financial success for a region.  The fifth is most likely a consequence of scoring well for these first four measures.

An obvious next step in making additional use of this map is to compare its findings with the distributions of various language, culture and ethnic groups in this country, according to most recent US Census patterns.  

 

 

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Walled World

Walled World | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 6:48 PM

It appears India is constructing a 2,500-mile long fence around its neighboring country Bangladesh. The barbed wire fence may have been built due to that fact India has one of the largest populations in the world and they do not want the struggling people of Bangladesh to enter their country. Also, areas around the fence are becoming dangerous, with more than 1,000 people killed by border patrol and criminals. There are not many jobs in Bangladesh and the people are having trouble finding clean drinkable water. Lastly, the people may be fleeing into India hoping to find work and an improved lifestyle.  

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 3:51 PM

Walls are a symbol of political boundaries and motives, usually intended to keep certain people in or out. This website in particular clearly highlights this idea in human geography as it explores the various walls that mark our landscape and thus contribute to changing policies and borders. Walls can also affect the landscape, not just mark it, as an effect of asserting either political dominance or border policies, as best seen by the resulting environmental results that come from it and the displacement of people (as seen on Palestinian-Israeli border). 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 10:06 PM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

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America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas

America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Provo, Utah, and Burlington, Vermont, represent opposite ends of the U.S. religiosity spectrum.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2013 8:07 AM

The majority of the most religious metros are concentrated in the South or Utah.  This particular weekend, many of the rythmns of urban life in Utah cities are remarkably visible as the LDS church holds it's semi-annual General Conference.  On the opposite side of spectrum, 5 of the 10 least religious metros are in New England; the west coast is the other center of diminished religiosity (with a mini-center in Colorado). 


Questions to ponder: What cultural patterns help to partially explain the levels of religiosity in the United States?  What other factors explain the patterns of religiosity in your in your local area? 


Tags: USA, culture, religion, Christianity.

Lyn Leech's comment, August 23, 2013 2:45 PM
The fact that as you get more westward (disregarding Utah,) religion looses popularity has to do with the people who, in the past, migrated there. It could be argued that super-religious people back in the old days who came from England to escape religious prosecution tended to get to the east coast and then settle there, whereas people who didn't have a church as a tether would be more likely to go out east to look for gold and things. It's an interesting map, regardless and the west's seeming lack of religion may be due to the fact that most of the population of the US is based on the east, due to extreme conditions in the west such as mountains and deserts.
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The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. That is not true anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 16, 2012 12:39 PM

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.     


Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


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Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 10:26 AM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
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U.S. Cities With Bigger Economies Than Entire Countries

U.S. Cities With Bigger Economies Than Entire Countries | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How do the individual economies of U.S. cities stack up against the world? Here’s a few quiz questions that can be answered with our chart of the 50 largest U.S. metro areas.

 

This article shows the economic strength of numerous greater metropolitan regions in the United States.  Even more important than the article is the "Interactive Graphics" which presents the tabular data of the top countries by GDP interlaced with U.S. metro area's GDPs.  Amazingly, 11 metropolitan areas (if they were independent countries) would rank in the top 50 countries of the world based on total GDP.


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Kelsey Saunders's comment, August 24, 2012 6:25 PM
This article really shows how economically high the united states is. It is crazy to think that New York is larger economically than a lot of countries such as Poland, Mexico, and Sweden. I wouldn't have ever thought that that would be possible. It makes me wonder how different it would be to live in a place that is very low economically.
Bradford Baumstark's comment, September 3, 2012 4:52 AM
I kinda expected cities like New York and Seattle to be on the list but out city is on the list to, above complete contires. That's what really astonished me because Virgigna Beach and Norfolk and Newport News aren't big cities. Some how we still have larger economies than entire countries like Angola Cuba and Oman. It makes me wonder how entire contires would be able to suport their citizens with an ecomomy smaller thn 3 cities.
Hannah Provost's comment, September 10, 2012 4:42 PM
This article is an eye opener, To think that New York is larger economically than countries like Sweden really puts it into perspective of how big the United States Is economically compared to other countries. I never thought that a single CITY in america would have a higher GDP than a free standing country. unbelievable.
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High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 16, 11:56 AM

This article, with its charts and interactive maps, is worth exploring to show some of the important spatial patterns of internal migration.  It's not hard to realize that larger, cosmopolitan metro areas will have an advantage in attracting and keeping prospective college graduates; the question that we should be asking our students is how will this impact neighborhoods, cities and regions?    


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, education.

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, June 19, 5:47 AM

Good charts/grafts - worth looking at and using with the concept of migration.   

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Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets

Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
World defense spending is expected to go up for the first time in five years, thanks to China and Russia.

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Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 2:22 PM

Brazil being in the top 15 of countries with the largest defense budget is not all that surprising considering the political, social, and economic situations of South America. Within Brazil’s sphere of influence, especially areas west of its developed cities, the Amazon jungle still is used by those deemed enemies of the state, whether actual or politically based. Because of that, there comes the difficult task of tracking and deterring rebel activity, arms or drug smuggling, etc. The borders that Brazil share with Bolivia, Colombia, and Venezuela; border security is  likely to be a concern due to the history of drug manufacture and shipping from those nations, along with the violence and corruption that comes with that activity. Not to mention the historical and violent political instability these countries have faced, which are still a concern for the region and world. Venezuela, being an “enemy of the U.S.” and Brazil being an ally, this border area is probably highly militarized or monitored. With this in mind, a slight musing could be given towards how much of the military aid and counter narcotics aid from the United States goes into Brazil’s military funding.

Brazil is also the one of the most stable and economically strong countries on the continent and in order to continue that, the government must be able to keep instability coming over from the border in check as well as deal with rebel forces using the Amazon as a safe haven. What is surprising to me however is that with how far away the rest of the countries in South America are from Brazil in military expenditures causes me to pause and think about just what they may be worrying about from their neighbors? Perhaps as they attempt to get a seat at the big table in international affairs, they feel having a stronger military will improve their image. They may not be worried about regional infighting due to the difficult terrain of the area which would make any military campaign extremely difficult and costly, besides a host of other reasons. In conclusion, Brazil is more than likely looking towards international interests in addition to showcasing their swelling national pride by spending $175 U.S. dollars per person on military expenditures while many continue to go hungry living in the famous favelas of Cidade de Deus.

 

Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, February 13, 4:48 AM

Con 25,2 miliardi di dollari L'Italia si piazza 14esima, prima dell'Iran


Oltre alla spesa complessiva, per i primi 10 paesi è riportato anche l'ammontare di spese militari pro capite.


Stati Uniti 2.000 $

Cina 83 $

Russia 475 $

Arabia Saudita 2.100 $ 

Regno Unito 900 $

Francia 797 $

Giappone, meno di 400 $

Germania 450 $

India 29 $

Brasile 175 $

 
E l'Italia? Basta dividere. Sono 413 $ a persona.

Ogni anno, la mia famiglia dà ben 2.065 $ alla difesa.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 10:32 AM

Russia is the third highest goverment military that spends around 143 million people lived in Russia in 2012 and they spent around $475 per person on it's military. Russia compared to China and the US is another story the US is number one in who spent the most on their military forces at $600.4 billion. As far as China is concerened it comes in at number two at spending around  $112.2 billion. These numbers make sense especially for the power house that China is and how their values of militarism affect their spending and their way of society/life.

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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 12, 2013 9:36 PM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:23 AM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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Allentown- Billy Joel

Home-made music video of Billy Joel's "Allentown".

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2013 1:12 PM

Many teachers use Billy Joel's classic song and music video Allentown as a teaching tool to introduce the topic of deindustrialization in the Rust Belt of the United States.  This alternative music video version adds some useful teaching images to help students contextualize the lyrics.  Another song to consider using is Telegraph Road by Dire Straits; the song follows a town as it industrialized and as it later deindustrialized.  


Tags: labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 4, 2013 5:26 PM

Deindustrialization and economic units

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 11:35 AM

Billy Joel's classic song and music video Allentown addresses the topic of deindustrialization in the Rust Belt of the United States.  This alternative music video version adds some images to help visualize the lyrics.  Another song that is similar is Telegraph Road by Dire Straits; the song follows a town as it industrialized and as it later deindustrialized.

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White Christmas?

White Christmas? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Probability of a white Christmas in U.S.

 

This is not a weather report; we are still too far out to start predicting that with any accuracy.  What this map does show is the statistical probabilities of snow cover thoughout the United States for December 25th based on past climatological data.    


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Outside the Amtrak Window, a Picture of the U.S. Economy

Outside the Amtrak Window, a Picture of the U.S. Economy | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The death and life of the industrial corridor linking New York and Washington.

 

This article is a great example of analyzing the landscape to observe changes in any given place.  This corridor is home to 8 of the 10 wealthiest counties; at the same time this transportation corridor is also home a half a dozen of the country's most broken cities.  Exploring this area is way to analyze the changing economic geographies of the United States.  For a visual representation of these same themes, see this 5 minute video that corresponds to this NY Times magazine article. 

 

Tags: industry, economy, unit 6 industy, transportation, neighborhood, landscape.


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Don Brown Jr's comment, November 20, 2012 9:06 AM
I can’t help but think of Rhode Island, specifically communities in Providence and how the decline of the textile industry and rise of the automobile has affected the contrast in standards of living and opportunities between the residents of the East Side and South Providence.
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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

 

Tags: USA, historical, visualization. 


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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 7:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 7:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 7:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The National Atlas that is available online has an extensive database for simple online mapping.  This is "GIS-light," an easy way to explore the spatial patterns within U.S. census data and other data sets.  The lists all contain a wide variety of variables, making this a good way to get students to explore potential research topics.  Thanks to the Connecticut Geographic Alliance coordinator for suggesting this link.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, August 27, 2012 8:10 AM
I think this website is great! I can see myself using this in a classroom. It provides a clear visual for students and anyone in general to view statistics on a variety of content.