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How religion(s) spread across the world

How religion(s) spread across the world | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
VIDEO: 5,000 years of religious history in two minutes.

Via Seth Dixon
FCHSAPGEO's insight:

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions.  What are the cultural barriers to the diffusion of one of these particular religions?  What geographic factors helped to facilitate the expansion of one of these world religions?   

 

Tags: religion, diffusion, culture, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism,
unit 3 culture.

 

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Clayton Nelson's curator insight, March 16, 9:53 AM
This video is extremely easy to watch but at the same time gives a lot of information. Very helpful! CN
Clayton Nelson's comment, April 4, 10:09 AM
It is amazing to see how quickly some religions spread compared to others especially once the Islamic religion began. Also i believe its a great thing that during the age of discovery, religions were taken over to the new world with those who traveled there.
Alexis Michelle's curator insight, April 4, 10:11 AM

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions. Each of these religions have been "born" somewhere and have grown to different countries. Everyone has a religion well most of everyone and I believe it is very important to know the history of the religion that you are or fit into.


Tags: religion, diffusion, culture, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism,
unit 3 culture.


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One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.

Via Seth Dixon
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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:38 PM
Going by either the name Xinjiang or Eastern Turkistan, Sometimes when people cannot agree on the name of a single place there is conflict, but apparently not here. it became an economic hub after they extracted natural gas, oil, and coal. Because of its location, a lot of the people in the area are Turkish and are Muslim. The Chinese government does not really like this and they are doing what they can to get rid of the Muslim ways, for example, one thing they have done is denounce the hijab, or ban any religious displays. .
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:11 AM

It is important to recognize that in a country so big, not everywhere is going to be the same. There is the city, the colder region, the dryer region, the warmer region, rural area etc. It is important to know that cultures are different as well. Some people refer to the red highlighted area s Xinjiang, but others call it Eastern Turkistan. Clearly, there are some cultural and political issues that reside in this area. The big concern is that the area is bordered to Central Asia and Eastern Asia as it has more Central and Eastern Asia characteristics as the people speak Turkic language and are predominantly Muslim. This goes to show that the Uygurs in this area are struggling to gain political power from China. Could there be a possible autonomy fight for this region? would it be politically and economically stable to stand on its own? 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:45 PM

it seems that this a a recurring theme with china. disputed lands surround this country inside and out, they claim to own all of it as well. but when the people that live their claim to be independent and choose not to associate themselves with you than it creates and interesting dynamic.

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Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques

Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Self-taught Iranian photographer gains rare access to shoot religious buildings as they've never been seen.  It's a side of Iran the rest of the world doesn't normally get to see -- the kaleidoscopically brilliant interiors of the country's intricately designed mosques.With beautiful mosaics and stained glass framed by powerful architecture, the buildings are astounding."

 

Tags: religion, culture, Islam, Iran, Middle East.


Via Seth Dixon
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Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:25 PM

Showing the sacred spaces of Islam and how they are designed around the world. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:47 PM

This was one of my favorite articles. We usually are very used to seeing negative sides to the Middle East and this gave it a different spin. This shows breathtaking pictures of the Mosques in Iran. This architecture isn't like anything I've seen with all of the symmetry and colors. These photos were taken by a student and were not easily taken. You have to have an eye to capture moments like this and pictures like this are not always appreciated. the detail that went into creating and designing these mosques are really special and I would love to actually see something like this in person. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 4:03 PM

Amazing photos of these mosques.  The detail and color in some of these mosques are extraordinary.  This kind of brilliance in color is something that is unexpected in this part of the world where everything seems to be so bland and alike in color or style.  Its surprising that the mosques don't let professional take pictures with certain equipment inside but let tourists take photos.  I would understand if the light from a camera could cause damage to the art, but these are the people who will be able to share these beautiful pictures with the rest of the world and show that there is more to Iran than what the outside may think.

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Malaysia's 'Allah' controversy

Malaysia's 'Allah' controversy | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Is limiting the use of the Arabic word for God a sign of growing intolerance towards minorities?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 2014 3:31 PM

In Arabic, the word Allah means God.  Christian Arabs refer to God as Allah and Arabic versions of the Bible reference Allah.  As Arabic and Islam have diffused in interwoven patterns, the linguistic root and the theological meanings have became intertwined to some.  BBC World and Al-Jazeera have reported on this issue as the Malaysian government has attempted to ban the use of the word Allah to any non-Muslim religious group.  Language and religion just got very political.  


Tags: languagereligion, political, Malaysia, SouthEastAsia, culture, Islam.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, June 25, 2014 4:25 PM

 Yes !!  The religion of love and peace, is not a religion, and sure that  not a pacific love,  just a bunch of hatred and criminals wich endanger  the  world, in the name  of a pedophile crazy, Muhamad, and  and  inexisting  allah, a  Devil, not a  God !!  The  Obama`s   "Holly  Curan ", a  dirty   instruction book  for killing !! 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 27, 2015 8:28 AM

Religion and politics are often effect each other in ways people can never imagine. Even in Western nations, were religion is separated from the state, religion still plays a major role in many political debates. This law banning the use of the word Allah by non- Muslim people in Malaysia is an extension of the political movement within Islam. Politics has been the major reason for the rise of the radical sect of Islam. It developed as reaction to the perceived westernizing of Muslim nations that was occurring in the 20th century. The Iranian revolution was a response to the westernizing polices of the Shah. It replaced a secular government with a theocratic one. ISIS main goal is to establish a caliphate i.e. a ruling empire. Throughout history, religion has been used as an excuse to build dynasties and gain more power. Politics in the true motivation behind much of this radicalization.

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


Via Seth Dixon
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Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 2015 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:16 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and perspectives

Although the article relating to this diagram is in Russian, the diagram is not, and I found it to be a very interesting visual to not only show world religions developing on a time scale, but also because it does a very good job of showing just how many little divisions of each religion they are, and how they are all intertwined. Zooming in on the diagram, you are able to see each divide, each new branch, and each date for hundreds of sets of information.

 

This illustrates the theme of identification of major world religions because it simply shows the mass amounts of tiny divisions that occur in the major world religions in a simple format. This is very helpful because this would be pages of writing if you tried to write it all out. 

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Life in Chechnya

Life in Chechnya | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Photojournalist Diana Markosian spent the last year and half covering Russia's volatile North Caucasus region.

 

These 33 photos are arranged to tell the cultural story of life in Chechnya, especially the life of young women coming of age in the aftermath of the war.  As the architecture of this mosque suggests, the influence of traditional Islamic values and Russian political authority have greatly shaped the lives of the Chechen people.


Via Seth Dixon, Kelly Reagan
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:24 PM

These pictures show many examples to how life in Chechnya for women is very different for women in the United States. We can see that these woman take part in similar day to day activities, but in very different ways. This is why their lives overall are much different than ours.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:28 PM

These photos show the culture of Chechnya. I found them very effective at mixing the environmental and cultural aspects of the area in these pictures. The one where two young people are on a date in a barren snow covered park sitting on opposites sides of the bench because close physical contact is forbidden before marriage. Although the school gym shows how women have to be dressed modestly even when they are exercising. 

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 10, 2015 7:33 PM

A picture says a thousand words.  I saw and learned more through these photos than I could of in any article, because you can really see what it's like there.  Authors and journalists can write and write about the facts and the people and the places, but they'll never really be able to show you, not the way pictures like these can.  The pictures of all these people show you what it's like to be there, how they live, what they do, their culture, beliefs, and ways of life. It's one thing to read about how strict rules for women are, but it's another to see those rules in action, like in gym class, and on dates.  We hear these ideas about countries who are strict with women, but can't really see what it would be like because we don't have that in the U.S., but these pictures make you feel it, not just think it.

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Ramadan 2012 begins

Ramadan 2012 begins | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
All over the world Muslims have begun their holiest month of the year by fasting from dawn until dusk each day, broken each evening by large, communal meals.

 

This photoessay is a visual and cultural delight.  Pictured above is a Pakistani boy who prays next to plates of fruits donated to worshippers to break their fast (Karachi, July 21, 2012).  On the first day of the holy fasting month of Ramadan, we see the communal ethos of Ramadan.


Via Seth Dixon
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Valentia Pollard's comment, September 4, 2012 7:15 PM
The fact that over 1 billion Muslims take part in Ramadan is incredible. My dad is apart of Ramadan and was telling me all about it. Its amazing how dedicated they are to their religion.
David Sanchez's comment, September 5, 2012 8:08 PM
It's amazing that so many people can be so dedicated to their religion, even if it means fasting for such a long period of time.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:32 PM

Ramadan is such a sacred holy month for Muslims. It is a crucial time for holiness and togetherness. Muslims fast, pray, and eat at evening breaking the fasts. It is a celebration that is taken very seriously, but can still incorporate in some fun with fireworks.

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Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn

Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
During summer, the sun never sets in Sweden's northernmost town, posing challenges for Muslims observing the holy month.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 17, 2015 2:35 PM

Like many early religious traditions, Ramadan is observed based on measurements from the moon and sun. The start of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon, which moves about 11 days back in the Gregorian calendar each year. During Ramadan the consumption of food and water is prohibited between dawn and dusk, how do Muslims observing the fast manage in the far north of Scandinavia, where the sun never sets in the summertime (in 2015, Ramadan is from June 17 to July 17)?  Some Muslims in the West (and north) argue that ancient customs from the Arabian desert need updating now that the religion has diffused beyond the Middle East.    


Tags: Islam, perspective, religiondiffusion, culture.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:57 PM

Like many early religious traditions, Ramadan is observed based on measurements from the moon and sun. The start of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon, which moves about 11 days back in the Gregorian calendar each year. During Ramadan the consumption of food and water is prohibited between dawn and dusk, how do Muslims observing the fast manage in the far north of Scandinavia, where the sun never sets in the summertime (in 2015, Ramadan is from June 17 to July 17)?  Some Muslims in the West (and north) argue that ancient customs from the Arabian desert need updating now that the religion has diffused beyond the Middle East.    


Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, diffusion, culture.

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Sunnis and Shiites

Sunnis and Shiites | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Clarissa Ward breaks down the history of differences between opposing sects of Islam

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 2015 8:58 PM

The geography of the Sunni-Shiite division is incredibly important for a good understanding of world regional geography as well as modern geopolitics. This 5 minute video (as well as this NPR podcast) examine the historical and religious aspects of this split to then analyze the political and cultural implications in the Middle East today.  Additionally this Pew Research article highlights the 5 countries where the the majority of Muslims are Shiite, with some good demographic data to add to the analysis.  Take this quiz to test your knowledge.  


Tags: MiddleEast, Islamreligionhistorical, culture.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, April 14, 2015 10:51 AM

Since Obama turmoil with his absurd Arab Spring, Sunni Shite are killing one the other like crazy Islamist

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 2015 10:07 PM

There is a very complicated history between two major religions in the Middle East. History shows how this religion was divided by Mohamed’s death. It turned into a totally new religion and now rivals in the Middle East. I have to mention that one of my co-workers is from Syria and his definition about Sunnis and Shiites are not open minded. The history behind the Muslims religions demonstrate that the more power they have the more places they will dominate. Furthermore, human rights are violated regardless of religious denomination. For some people, Sunnis are considered as terrorist and compared to extremist groups such as Al Qaeda and ISIS. These people who do not want to implement any kind of technology in their countries are holding on to the past with their religion. However, the Shiites experience more freedom even though they still follow strict religious rules. Even the US is confused about these Middle Eastern religions as countries that used to be governed by Sunnis now are run by Shiites. The US needs to remain neutral regarding these religious changes.

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


Via Seth Dixon
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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:13 AM

Great insight into our 5 major world religions.

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:06 PM

This is also a good introductory video for the Religion unit.  It will at least give students a general overview of the major world religions as a baseline of information to reference when diving deeper into the unit content.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 10:10 AM

unit 3

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The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split

The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The division between Islam's Shiite minority and the Sunni majority is deepening across the Middle East. The split occurred soon after the death of the Prophet Muhammad, nearly 1,400 years ago.

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 19, 2015 8:11 PM

The Islam-Sunni favors the father-in-law of Muhammad Abu Bakr and is strictly orthodox. The Islam-Shi'ite favors Muhammad's son-in-law Ali and it mostly practiced in Iran, southern Iraq and southern Lebanon. Sunni on the other hand is practiced throughout the northern part of Africa and throughout the whole middle east. In the middle east, 85% of the muslim population between Sunni and Shi'ite is Sunni and 15% practices Shia. Between Sunni and Shi'ite, Sunni appears to be the more popular and dominant Islamic religion.

David Lizotte's curator insight, March 31, 2015 5:04 PM

The middle east is a topic of discussion for people throughout America. I say the Middle East in a broad sense because there are a numerous amount of topics one could discuss in regards to the middle east. Politics, violence, terrorism, the faith of Islam in general, the list goes on. But it seems not many people go into the Sunni Shiite conflict in depth. In order to understand much of what goes on in the Middle East one needs to understand the two divisions between Islam, why they exist and what has been the history/significance of the relationship. I wonder sometimes if the people reporting the news realize what they are saying, whom the people/groups of people involved are, and what the significance of there being is. The video shown in class involving the two news reporters discussing/asking questions  about the Middle East with a scholar on the show definitely proved people are ignorant to the Middle East. They painted it with a "broad brush." If they can't even realize the vast size of Islam and the fact that they are generalizing when reporting terrorism thus linking the faith of Islam in general to it then I can only imagine what it would do to their heads to find out that there are two main divisions of Islam. It's bad when the people reporting the news don't understand the significance of what they are saying. It raises questions as to how the American people, whom are not well versed in the Middle East, interpret Islam and its people. Reading articles and listening to discussions would certainly help educate people and honestly this "scoop" was very clear in stating the origin, meaning, and significance of the two different divisions.  

I find the oil situation in the Middle East interesting to say the least. The Shiite's are the clear minority in Islam yet they control 80% of the Middle East's oil. It is crazy to think how the Safavid Dynasty set up shop in what is now Iran... In time Iran would prove to be rich in oil. Other parts of the middle east that are extremely rich in oil like southern Iraq, the eastern region of the Arabian Peninsula and Lebanon are also Shiite. So in this case the minority has access to and controls an extreme amount of wealth. I'm sure there are people whom discuss the Middle East and oil yet don't know the religious aspects of the territory. Just through taking five minutes to read an article such as this an individual may form a different perception of Islam or specifically, in regards to this paragraph, oil in the Middle East. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 1:57 PM

having been to this part of the world and encountered obviously countless muslims and talking to several. i learned and witnessed first hand the hate that these people have for eachother, they are on such opposite sides of this religion and it is perplexing because it is the same religion and the debate is over such minor details of it (but judeism christianity and islam are all pretty much the same with minor differences arnt they?)

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 2014 12:45 PM

There is something to be said about how film and the media can be used as an effective tool to touch on broad cultural ideals. On a related note, I will be attending a conference soon in Boston on social studies education and one of the seminars I will be going to is how to use SciFi movies in the classroom. Ideals like equality, fighting oppression and free speech are timeless and span many cultures, in Pakistan, the Burka Avenger is that area's media outlet to discuss key social topics to young people.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 2015 4:25 PM

A modern day Batman/Superman, Burka Avenger, with great graphics and an in-depth plot. The television shows the Pakistanis children watch are the same type of shows that I watched growing up, and the shows that the modern day children of today’s youth are watching. The cross-cultural relationship seems so different, but at the roots it is the same. The kids in this show have friends, pets, enemies, a hero, a conflict; everything that an American television show would feature.  Whether the kids are facing a bully, a school closure from a villain, or a life peril from another villain, there undercover school teacher is there ready and willing to save the day. Everybody needs a hero to look up to, so this show is great for the Pakistani youth. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:06 AM

I think this is wonderful.  It also reemphasizes the reality that all children are born without preconceived notions of what is right, what is wrong, what is good, or what is evil.  An American child might look at this and automatically think that the lady in the Burka is a "villain", due to American media and propaganda.  I can't help but think of the backlash that would surround this cartoon if they ever tried to put it on American airwaves.  

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An Annotated Map of Today's Protests and of the 'Muslim World'

An Annotated Map of Today's Protests and of the 'Muslim World' | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The violent backlash against the American film is taking place in Muslim societies, but it doesn't seem to correlate with Islam's reach.

 

This is a good reminder that the generalizing about "all Muslims" is as inaccurate as generalization about "all Christians" or any other group.  The world and people are much more nuanced than that. 

 

Tags: MiddleEast, Islam, conflict.


Via Seth Dixon
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Martin Daumiller's comment, September 16, 2012 2:53 AM
The map is slightly poor. 100% and more world muslim population? There is a great mix-up between muslims living in a country and percentage of muslims living in a country, therefore turning the U.S., Russia, etc. also into the discussion.
Also there is a distinction between not-protesting and not supporting the protests, which should influence the authers comparision of different mentalities.
The main idea against stereotypes and generalization is a very worthy one, but the way is article shows it is flawed.