Fantastic Geography 2016
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The Evolution of the World Map

The Evolution of the World Map | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it

"Use our interactive In Charted Waters tool which shows information & visuals on how our knowledge of the world map has evolved."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 19, 2:41 PM

This interactive map/timeline takes users (shared before but the URL has been updated here) around the world through the major events representing the expansion of human knowledge.  Admittedly, this is represents knowledge from a Eurocentric perspective, but that is somewhat appropriate in this instance since that was the largest store of spatial knowledge as this global information coalesced.  Users can visualize the coordination of absolute space and realize the actions undertaken that shifted geography from its predecessor, cosmology.  Each achievement came through intensive exploration and the detailed mapping of those endeavors.

 

Tagshistoricalmappingcartography, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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How Things Spread

How Things Spread | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
What makes an idea, a brand, or a behavior catch fire? This hour, TED speakers explore the mysteries behind the many things we spread: laughter and sadness, imagination, viruses and viral ideas.

Via Seth Dixon
Trish Harris's insight:

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

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Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 21, 2:34 PM

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

Jelel Ezzine's curator insight, March 25, 3:13 AM

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 12:57 PM

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it

"While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 2015 10:24 AM

It is amazing what irrigation can produce.  The border between China and Kazakhstan is a perfect picture of land with irrigation and one without supplied water.  Eastern Kasakhstan has farmland but it is only subsidized by natural rainfall whereas on the greener Chinese side of the border it is supplemented with water by the farmers.  Great picture!

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 12:00 PM

Seeing such a striking difference between two countries that are so close together is strange and thought-provoking. Knowing a little bit about the two countries can make a world of difference, though. In this case, we have China and Kazakhstan, two countries located in East/Central Asia. Kazakhstan borders China to the west, along the northern part of its western border. Much of China's inland land use is devoted to agriculture, as the majority of its industry is located near its coast. This is evident by the amount of green space seen in the satellite image above. With well over a billion people to feed, China needs to make use of as much of its arable land as possible. Kazakhstan, on the other hand is a much smaller country with much less land devoted to agriculture. Its farmland is mostly large and industrial, as a result of Soviet-era farming and is rain-fed rather than irrigated, like China's.

 

Knowing the history as well as the economic strengths of a country can therefore be useful in interpreting satellite images such as the one in this article. A lack of knowledge about China and Kazakhstan's economy and history may lead to an assumption that the Chinese are just better farmers than the Kazakhs. This is of course not necessarily true, but what is true is that China has a much larger and more immediate need for agriculture than does Kazakhstan and so devotes more of its land, time, and energy to farming. Likewise, it shouldn't be assumed that Kazakhstan has no need for agriculture at all. Instead, its history has largely influenced its economic strengths and needs, and the result is a country that looks very different from China. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 19, 2015 12:41 PM

It's crazy to see how much human influences can reshape the landscape, or how things we tend to think of in more abstract terms- like national boundaries- can be very physical in nature. I liked reading about the differing agricultural approaches the two nations take, and being able to see the physical manifestations of those two different approaches so obviously. It's impressive to think that China is able to support such a massive population- one in every 5 people alive on the planet is Chinese- with so little land, and the consequences are plain to see in the image above. Increased irrigation efforts leads to the unnaturally bright green patches in the middle of a relatively dry area, serving as a symbol of man's attempts to bind mother nature to his will. Although not always successful, such attempts appear to be working well here. In contrast, Kazakhstan's population demands vary wildly from that of China's, and its solution for feeding its people can therefore take a more natural, backroads approach, with food production concentrated in a few areas. I wonder what other international borders can be seen so neatly with the naked eye.

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NESTVAL 2015: The Geography of Food

"My 2015 NESTVAL presentation in an APHG session on the geography of food."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 10, 2015 12:29 AM

In this presentation (PPTx file here), I share some of my favorite resources for teaching the content as well as some pedagogical tips.  Some of these resources are found in an article I wrote for National Geographic or have been shared on this site earlier.  Here are some pedagogical tips to APHG students about food systems:  

  • Tip#1: Don’t demonize agribusiness or romanticize the family farm. 
  • Tip #2: Use data and maps.  Here is a map in ArcGIS online on rural land use activities with a handy dandy instruction guide, ready to go (many more APHG GeoInquiries from ESRI set to be released soon). 
  • Tip #3: Connect them personally into the web of food systems and show how it impacts them. 
  • Tip #4: Let this be one of those units that connects to all the themes of the course, especially population, culture, political, and the environment.  


Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, APHG.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:09 PM

Things to consider when teaching about food production from a geographical perspective - remember to link to Biomes.

asli telli's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:40 AM

#Food is #geographical and #mobile...

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Ptolemy's Map and Geographia


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 1, 1:57 PM

Who was Ptolemy and what were some important contributions to geography?  This student-produced video does a nice of introducing him to a modern audience.

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Another weird effect of climate change — too many female sea turtles - The Washington Post

Another weird effect of climate change — too many female sea turtles - The Washington Post | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it

Climate change is affecting wildlife in a lot of serious, and occasionally weird, ways. It’s destroying the icy habitats of polar bears and walruses. It’s driving fish species out of their normal habitats and taking away the food supplies of seals, sea lions and whales. It’s even causing bumblebees’ tongues to shrink.

Now, scientists have revealed another unexpected climate effect: It may be disrupting the sex ratio among baby sea turtles.


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Mapping the World's Problems

Mapping the World's Problems | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
Google Earth Engine works with scientists by using satellite imagery to provide data visualizations for environmental and health issues.

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Todd Hallsten's comment, February 13, 2015 10:39 PM
I like the idea of this map because it allows for the comparison of logged forest to preserved forest. Allowing for facts not rumored amount of trees producing air, i would really like to see a map of alaska..
Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 16, 2015 12:23 AM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 1:04 AM

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

"A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on the equivalent scale to major geological processes."


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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, September 24, 2014 11:55 AM

El Antropoceno,  nueva era geológica

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:33 AM

Summer reading KQ1: How has the Earth's environment changed over time?

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:44 PM

Many geologists and other scientists now recognize that we are in a new geologic era.  This new era, called the Anthropocene, is distinguished by the fact that one species (homo sapiens), is dramatically modifying the environment. These modifications are impacting geologic processes to such a degree that this time period is geologically distinct (see this remote sensing interactive for examples of environmental change).  Paul Crutzen, a Nobel Prize–winning scientist who champions the term Anthropocene declared, “It’s no longer us against ‘Nature.’ Instead, it’s we who decide what nature is and what it will be.”  This video is a great primer for discussing the nature and extent of human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change.  This is definitely one of my favorite resources. 

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The Language of Maps Kids Should Know

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
The vocabulary and concepts of maps kids should learn to enhance their map-skills & geography awareness. Concise definitions with clear illustrations.



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Anita Vance's curator insight, June 30, 2014 8:54 AM

This article helps give an early start to map skill implementation - even at the earliest levels.

DTLLS tutor's curator insight, July 1, 2014 5:04 AM

Love this website. Not just this article, but the whole idea. Have a little browse around...

wereldvak's curator insight, July 6, 2014 2:53 PM

De taal van de kaart: welke  woordenschat hebben kinderen nodig om de kaart te kunnen lezen?

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Geographical Association - Option Time

Geographical Association - Option Time | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
The GA supports primary and secondary geography teachers through teaching resources, geography journals, CPD events, Barnaby Bear, Worldwise and more.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 19, 2014 5:12 AM

Great ideas here if you have not seen them before - doesn't have to be for option time - remind students every week what Geography can do for them. 

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Interactive Wind Map

Interactive Wind Map | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
Mesmerizing.

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 13, 2014 4:30 PM

Stunning interactive wind map.

Richard Thomas's curator insight, March 13, 2014 5:23 PM

Excellent for visual learners.

K_Lynam's curator insight, March 20, 2014 4:43 PM

The Ides of March definitely BLEW into our area!  Perfect timing to find @Seth Dixon's Scoop of this interactive Wind Map!

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12 ways to make cities more child-friendly - Spacing National

12 ways to make cities more child-friendly - Spacing National | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
For far too long, many people have considered family life and urban life as being mutually exclusive. That trend is slowly reversing, as more and more parents choose to raise their kids in urban areas. However, city builders often fail to consider their smallest, most vulnerable users. As Enrique Peñalosa famously said: “”Children are a …

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 7, 2014 8:21 PM

Australian Curriculum Geography - enhancing liveability for all age groups - particularly young people

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NASA Releases 3 Million Thermal Images of Our Planet Earth via Open Culture

NASA Releases 3 Million Thermal Images of Our Planet Earth via Open Culture | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
Since 1999, NASA has used ASTER (Japan's Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) to gather images of the Earth's surface, providing a way to 'map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.' They've mapped 99% of the planet's surface over the years, generating nearly three million images, showing all kinds of things -- 'from massive scars across the Oklahoma landscape from an EF-5 tornado and the devastating aftermath of flooding in Pakistan, to volcanic eruptions in Iceland and wildfires in California.'



And now, NASA is letting the public download and use those images at no cost.

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These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
Just 15 years ago, cross-border digital flows were almost non-existent. Today, they exert a larger impact on global economic growth than traditional flows of goods, which developed over centuries.

Via Seth Dixon
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"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Annenkov's curator insight, March 31, 5:53 AM

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, March 31, 6:13 AM

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

malbert's curator insight, April 4, 4:15 PM

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it

"Food. It’s something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Geographic because it connects all of us to our environment. The recent global population projections for the year 2100 just went up from 9 billion to 11 billion, making the issues of food production and distribution all the more important.  For the last 3 years I’ve stored podcasts, articles, videos, and other resources on my personal site on a wide range of geographic issues, including food resources.  I thought that sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources on the geography of food would be helpful to understand our changing global food systems."


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Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2015 2:01 AM

Ten engaging resources on the geography of food

Kaiden-Leigh Cloete's curator insight, April 29, 2015 11:15 PM

This topic connects to our agricultural unit. This article describes the explaining of food. Knowing where our food comes from is a big component in lit today, with all the GMO's going around we don't know what we r busy consuming daily. Having more information in our minds about food would help decrease the long term affects of genetically modified organisms, help maintain a healthy economy, provide more resources such as water, because if GMO's do come to an end then the water will not be as polluted as it is now due to the runoff from the remaining chemicals in GMO's, and also provide a healthy environment for everyone. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:10 AM

I absolutely love this article. It touches on many of the most important and challenging issues facing food production in the world, ranging from food manufacturing ethics to global hunger. I think it's interesting how, although we all eat food everyday, we don't think about the many implications associated with the production and consumption of food. To more privileged people, food is not a big deal, as anyone can get food at any time of day. However, for people who are trying to solve the problems associated with food in the modern world or for people who are suffering from hunger and malnutrition, the information presented in this article is extremely important. Brilliant minds can come together to propose potential solutions for all the problems facing food distribution. I can't wait for the day every child can go to bed with a full stomach, and I am willing to do my part to help make that happen.

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Eratosthenes calculation for the size of the earth around 240 BC


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 1, 12:45 PM

Eratosthenes is often referred to as the "father of geography" for creating meridians and parallels on his maps to organize global information, classifying climatic zones, and as shown in the video, calculating the circumference of the Earth. Plus, he coined the terms so he gets the credit. If you have never pondered the meaning of the word "geometry," the accomplishments of Eratosthenes will certainly show that the mathematical prowess was at the heart of expanding our collective geographic knowledge. 

 

Tagsmapping, math, location, historical.

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Changes in Three Gorges Dam

“NASA's animation of China's Three Gorges Dam construction over the years.”
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2015 6:32 PM

Inland water - environmental change 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 5:40 PM

The impact of the Three Gorges Dam on the residents upstream is amazing. I cannot imagine anything like this happening in the US, mostly because of the impact on the people both upstream and downstream. Ecological damage from this dam may not phase the Chinese government, but I think any North American or European government would shudder at the thought of the backlash among their citizens this would create.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:27 PM

Three Gorges damn in China is the largest dam ever constructed. This was created to save on power by creating hydroelectric power for the people of the land. One of the issues with this was the the flooding of the land up streams displacing millions of people. It created a larger up stream area and very small down stream. A lot of the people that lived up stream had to be relocated further inland and faced changing climatif weather. The banks of the river are carved out between what seems like mountainous regions so as you move more uphill the weather and temperature will be a whole new category of life (Depending on how far you relocated).

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Great, Climate Change Could Cost The World Trillions More Than We Thought

Great, Climate Change Could Cost The World Trillions More Than We Thought | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
“All is not lost, researchers warn, but we need to act swiftly.”
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World Wonders - Google Cultural Institute

World Wonders - Google Cultural Institute | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
From the archaeological areas of Pompeii to the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, Google’s World Wonders Project aims to bring to life the wonders of the modern and ancient world.

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GwynethJones's curator insight, February 15, 2015 12:54 PM

World of Wonders.

Culture really is very important to share with our kiddos.

Are we curating our own culture reliably? With thought? 

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The world as it is: The influence of religion

The world as it is: The influence of religion | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it

"Seldom has it been more important for Americans to form a realistic assessment of the world scene. But our current governing, college-­educated class suffers one glaring blind spot.

Modern American culture produces highly individualistic career and identity paths for upper- and middle-class males and females. Power couples abound, often sporting different last names. But deeply held religious identities and military loyalties are less common. Few educated Americans have any direct experience with large groups of men gathered in intense prayer or battle. Like other citizens of the globalized corporate/consumer culture, educated Americans are often widely traveled but not deeply rooted in obligation to a particular physical place, a faith or a kinship."


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Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:17 PM

My APHUG students will read this article before even beginning our study of religion.  My hope is that this may at the very least help them empathize with the religious fervor that still has such a profound impact on the culture of much of the world.  

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 18, 2015 12:26 PM

With the rise and fall of human civilizations have come the rise and fall of religions as well. Americans have grown unaware of the  beliefs and teachings of other religions. They do not know the difference between ethnic and universalizing religions. They do not know that Islam is the fastest expanding religion in the world even though Christianity still has the most followers. Unit 3 Culture

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 3:57 PM

This article shows how religion affects the world around us and its importance in governments. Especially in the middle east (Saudi Arabia), countries often import factors of their major religion into their government. 

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Planet Ocean - YouTube

Planet Ocean - YouTube | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
A 90 minute film directed by Yann Arthus-Bertrand and Michael Pitiot. Can we imagine a film that would change the way people look at the ocean? Can we explai...

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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 27, 2014 3:21 PM

A 90 minute film directed by Yann Arthus-Bertrand and Michael Pitiot. Can we imagine a film that would change the way people look at the ocean? Can we explai...


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The evolution of London: the city's near-2,000 year history mapped

The evolution of London: the city's near-2,000 year history mapped | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
How did London become what it is today? Researchers at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis trawled huge datasets to map the transformation of the capital since Roman times
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The Human Imprint

The Human Imprint | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it
A Human Geography Resource; Especially for Teachers

 

The Human Imprint is home to everything Human Geography related for the student, educator, and the every day Joe/Jane. This site includes geographic related stories, lesson plans, and other links that bring us closer to understanding the “why of where.”


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SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 7:58 AM

Words leading to new Geography treads.

good for up to date articles.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 6:54 PM

Unit 1

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:15 PM

course resource

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Why Leaders Should Learn Geography - GeoLounge

Why Leaders Should Learn Geography - GeoLounge | Fantastic Geography 2016 | Scoop.it

Anne-Laure Fréant talks about the importance of geographic knowledge in today's society. Kirk Goldsberry mentioned in “The Importance of Spatial Thinking” that “Harvard eradicated its Geography Department in the 1940′s, and many universities followed suit”. Indeed, not only has geography never been part of business programs, it gradually vanished from education fields that matter in prestigious schools, with no major revival since the 1940′s.


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, February 26, 2014 3:56 AM

Simple logic really..."It is a way of thinking that crosses time and space at any possible scale to see and understand what is happening. It connects the dimensions of the world – societies, environment, economy, politics, finance, psychology… – by offering unique key concepts and theoretical tools."

Hoolee Nan's curator insight, March 30, 2014 5:14 PM

A great way to do a virtual excursion with the classroom. Children can learn about landmarks, directions, the jargon in maps and other aspects of geography.