Family Origins, including Country of Origin - Early Stage 1 - Cultural Diversity: CUES1: Communicates some common characteristics that all people share, as well as some of the differences
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The Family Song

Family Song
Maliya Shen's insight:

Description of resource:

"The Family Song" is a great song accompanied by vivid colourful animations perfectly suited to a kindergarten class to learn and understand what a family is in a fun and creative way. This song begins with a chickadee (bird) who lives in a tree with his mummy and daddy chickadees and that they are a family. Then there is also  a family of matinees under the sea who are also a family. Followed by a family of penguins, a family of humans and a huge family of rabbits. This is a great song for Early Stage One students to learn about families, to comprehend that all families are different in size, species, age and composition and everyone must come from a family. This song includes words that rhymes with a simple happy beat that is cute and catchy. A kindergarten class will definitely have a fun time learning about family  and family origins by singing along with this song while watching the animations on the Interactive Smart Board.

 

A teaching idea:

Teachers can get students to sing and watch "The Family Song" and after discussing with the students what their notion of family is (which links in with Creative Arts/Music KLA). Before starting the song, good idea to go through with all the important key words, such as chickadee and matinee. Brainstorm up on the Interactive White Board (IWB) a concept map, by asking the students what a family is, who are the different types of members (eg, usually has a mum, dad and baby; animals can have a family and so can humans). Students will be asked to come up to the board and write a word that entails family. Teachers will help students to sing along with "The Family Song", by putting the words of the song up onto an overhead projector, so the whole class can see and sing together to the song. The students will get to sing the song over and over again by watching and listening to the Youtube clip, this will help them to become more competent in singing the song. Students can also be taught dance moves that go with the song to make the lesson more fun and active (which will link in with Creative Arts/Dance and PDHPE/Dance).

 

Assessment Task:

Students can draw a picture of a family and write one sentence describing that family. They can also label all the different family members in the family. For those high ability children, they can write a story on the family.

 

A literacy and numeracy strategy:

Literacy strategy - By getting the students to read the words to the song on the overhead projector in order to master the song, is an excellent and very effective literacy strategy, by encouraging the class creatively improve on their reading in a fun way as indicated in the English Syllabus ' ENe-4A Demonstrates developing skills and strategies to read, view and comprehend short, predictable texts on familiar topics in different media and technologies' (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.37). Also, by getting the children to label their family members or write one sentence describing the family in their picture in the assessment task, is another literacy strategy, which helps children to improve their writing. This can be linked to the English Syllabus 'ENe-2A Composes simple texts to convey an idea or message' (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.33).

 

Numeracy strategy - This task incorporates a numeracy task by getting the students to count how many members are in each family in the song (eg, three members in the chickadee family), as linked to the mathematics outcome 'MAe-4NA Counts to 30, and orders, reads and represents numbers in the range 0 to 20' (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.45).

 

Link to pedagogical research:

Music is central to quality early childhood development (Schiller, 2008, para.1). It plays a  crucial job in establishing the atmosphere of the classroom, developing skills and concepts, helping children make transitions, and creating a sense of community. Lately, early literacy has a  strong national focus and discovered that singing songs, reciting chants and rhymes play a valuable role in forming the foundation for reading preparation. Evidence indicates that these activities can enhance vocabulary and develop sound discrimination, which are vital to the development of literacy. The scope of a child’s vocabulary and ability to discriminate sounds are formidable forecasters of how a child will learn to read easily when exposed to literacy learning (Adams, Foorman, Lundberg & Beeler, 2002, as cited by Schiller, 2008, para.2).

By getting the students to write on the IWB and in their assessment tasks is highly important to make them successful in literacy. By increasing the time that primary grade students write shapes them into better writers (Graham, Gillespie & McKeown, 2013, p.8). Describing a picture is very beneficial for children's oral language development (Hill, 2012, p.53). However, teachers must gradually use pictures with increased complex themes and help children elaborate on their description of their pictures by questioning (Hill, 2012, p.53).

Furthermore, IWBs and other similar ICTs are strongly valued by teachers in the classroom as features such as clip art images, sound, animations, videos and hyperlinks proved to strengthen lessons, as teachers believe these aspects captures children's attention, prolong concentration and increase motivation for learning (Wood & Ashfield, 2008, p.91). Images displayed on the IWB were better quality than alternative resources such as overhead transparencies, posters and photocopied worksheets (Wood & Ashfield, 2008, p.91). Wood & Ashfield (2008, p.91), declares "Both teachers and students felt that the IWB and associated software enabled them to create ‘lively and exciting lessons’, drawing on video clips, photographs, animations and text from a variety of sources...".

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6: Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum: English K-10 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum" Mathematics K-10 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Graham, S., Gillespie, A., McKeown, D. (2013). Writing: Importance, Development and Instruction. Reading and Writing An Interdisciplinary Journal, 26, 1-15.

 

Hill, S. (2012). Developing Early Literacy: Assessment and Teaching (2nd Edition). Victoria, NSW: Eleanor Curtain Publishing.

 

Schiller, P. (2008). Songs and Rhymes as a Springboard to Literacy. Retrieved March 09, 2014 from: http://www.earlychildhoodnews.com/earlychildhood/article_home.aspx?ArticleID=478

 

Wood, R. & Ashfield, J. (2008). The use of the interactive whiteboard for creative teaching and learning in literacy and mathematics: a case study. British Journal of Educational Technology, 39, 84-96.

 

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Lucy's Family Tree picture book - Global Perspective

Lucy's Family Tree picture book - Global Perspective | Family Origins, including Country of Origin - Early Stage 1 - Cultural Diversity: CUES1: Communicates some common characteristics that all people share, as well as some of the differences | Scoop.it
Schreck's long-winded, laborious story introduces Mexican-born Lucy, adopted in infancy by an American couple. When her teacher gives an assignment to make a family tree and Lucy insists that s
Maliya Shen's insight:

Description of resource:

Lucy’s Family Tree is a picture book by Karen Halvorsen Schreck that offers students with a global perspective of family heritage.Lucy is Mexican-born and adopted in infancy by an American couple. One day Lucy’s teacher hands her a family tree assignment, but Lucy's adoption from Mexico makes her think that her family is far too "different," but her parents encouraged Lucy to try and search three families that are the "alike." As Lucy investigates her school and family friends who she thinks are "same," she finds that there are actually no families that are the "same" but different kinds of families. Lucy triumphs her bet with her parents in a surprising way and ends up creating a family tree that celebrates both her past and present. This is a superb book for understanding family diversity and what signifies a family. The book proves that all families possess similarities and differences.

 

A teaching idea:

Before reading the book go through a key word bank such as family tree, mum, dad, brother, uncle, grandmother, cousin to prepare the students to read the book. After reading the book, generate a class discussion on the main theme of the book by asking questions (eg, Are all family trees the same? Why are families different" How different is Lucy's family to your's?). Explain to students they can each construct their own family tree just like Lucy. Before this, show them a family tree the teacher has already made to model what is wanted from them. They will be asked to bring to class from home photographs of their family members or draw pictures of their families and arrange them in a family tree structure, by using a family tree template. Students will label their family trees. Tell the class, just like Lucy, we will be creative and decorate the family trees, so that they are all different. After this, we will also gather on the floor in a big circle to observe and discuss each other's family tree and try to find atleast three that are the same (critical inquiry approach). Help students to highlight the similarities and differences. This activity reflects the content ‘compares their own characteristics with those of others in the class’ for the outcome CUES1 (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p. 28).

 

Assessment task:

Conduct a class discussion, how each person's family are all different and ask them why. On the IWB prepare a  large colourful tree. Get students to locate different members in a family and label it with pre-prepared cards that contain the name of the family member (eg, mum, dad, brother, uncle). This will help to analyse and assess how much students know about members in a family. Moreover, ask students at the end, does everyone's family have all these members in their family? (No). Ask them why?

 

A literacy and numeracy strategy:

Literacy strategy - By reading the story book to the students is a literacy task - 'ENe-8B Demonstrates emerging skills and knowledge of texts to read and view, and shows developing awareness of purpose, audience and subject matter'. During the family tree activity, try to get students to read out family members such as mum, dad and brother to aid in enriching their vocabulary - 'ENe-9B Demonstrates developing skills and knowledge in grammar, punctuation and vocabulary when responding to and composing texts'.

Numeracy strategy - While reading the book, get students to count how many members are there in each family in the book. At the end of constructing their family tree tasks, get the students to count the members in their family 'MAe-2WM uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems' (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.45).

 

Link to pedagogical research:

Research reveals that children who are read to frequently from infancy acquire greater vocabularies and become better readers in school (Bredeson, 2011, para.2).  Studies have found shared reading and reading aloud promotes language and literacy development (Aram 2008; Bus, Van Ijzendoorn & Pellegrini 1995, as cited in Hill, 2012, p.103). By reading this book digitally via e-book, would be even more effective for the students reading and literacy development. E-book hi-techs have advanced, so there are new methods of interacting with enormously shared, adaptive and dynamic books (Sharples, McAndrew, Weller, Ferguson, FitzGerald, Hirst, Mor, Gaved, & Whitelock, 2012, p.3). Teachers are able to write alternative adaptations of texts, install pictures, graphs and images to support the texts, affix summaries, and enforce tools including timers or calculators to support constructive learning and formative assessment (Sharples et al, 2012, p.3).

Likewise, By using a critical inquiry approach to teaching the students in learning is an enormously valuable tool (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.46). "Dewey saw the classroom as replicating the community where children engage in authentic learning, playing out important role and learning social responsibility..." (Hill, 2012, p.3). Dewey believed the process of learning how to learn was central. It is essential that children investigate how they learn and how knowledge develops by asking questions and then actively seeking these answers in synergy with others like a democratic community (Hill, 2012, p.4).

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6: Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum: English K-10 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum" Mathematics K-10 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Bredeson, A. C. (2011). Born to read promotes importance of reading to children. McClatchy - Tribune Business News. Retrieved April 02, 2014 from: http://ezproxy.library.usyd.edu.au/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/872423051?accountid=14757

 

Hill, S. (2012). Developing Early Literacy: Assessment and Teaching (2nd Edition). Victoria, NSW: Eleanor Curtain Publishing.

 

Sharples, M., McAndrew, P., Weller, M., Ferguson, R., FitzGerald, E., Hirst, T., Mor, Y., Gaved, M., & Whitelock, D. (2012). Innovating Pedagogy 2012: Exploring new forms of teaching, learning and assessment, to guide educators and policy makers. UK: The Open University.

 

 

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Tom Tom picture book - Aboriginal perspective

Tom Tom picture book - Aboriginal perspective | Family Origins, including Country of Origin - Early Stage 1 - Cultural Diversity: CUES1: Communicates some common characteristics that all people share, as well as some of the differences | Scoop.it
Maliya Shen's insight:

Description of resource:

This is an engaging contemporary picture book about a preschool aged Aboriginal boy living in the Top End of Northern Territory, a remote indigenous community with his extended family. Tom Tom is part of a large extended family of grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins, who are all involved in his upbringing. The story traces the adventures of the little boy as he goes to preschool, eats lunch with Granny Annie in the bottom camp, swims in the Lemonade Springs in the afternoon and spends the night with Granny May and grandfather Jo in the top camp. This book is easy to read text and contains vibrant illustrations which encapsulates the events of Tom Tom's world as he travels within his community from relative to relative.

 

A teaching idea:

This web site, and picture book resource, would also be great when addressing the content ‘describes the groups that individuals belong to, eg, the class, the family group, friends, Aboriginal language group' and ‘compares their own characteristics with those of others’ (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, P.26), associated with the outcome CUES1 to children in Early Stage 1. The book depicts Tom Tom belonging in a large extended family of grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins, who are all part of his nurturing, so this could be discussed by comparing with the concept of a nuclear family as a family unit in some cultures, whereas in other cultures there may be an extended family. Students can also be asked what type of family they live in. Another teaching idea would be to create a mind map on the Smart Board of what events and customs of Tom Tom’s daily ritual growing up with his family involves. Then students can compare this with a mind map of their own habits and events growing up with their own families at home. This will allow students to see and understand how Tom Tom’s family life is similar and different to their own family life.

 

Assessment task:

Students can draw pictures, write a sentence underneath each picture depicting the daily life of Tom Tom. Then they could also draw pictures and a sentence underneath each picture to describe the pictures of their own daily life. Students will get into pairs to share what the difference and similarities between the two life styles.

 

A literacy and numeracy strategy:

Literacy strategy - Reading the book to the class is a literacy task - 'ENe-4A Demonstrates developing skills and strategies to read, view and comprehend short, predictable texts on familiar topics in different media and technologies' (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.37). By putting up a word bank before reading the book  also makes the lesson a literacy strategy - 'ENe-9B Demonstrates developing skills and knowledge in grammar, punctuation and vocabulary when responding to and composing texts' (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p46).

Numeracy strategy - Teachers should encourage children to count while reading the book, how many people or members are there in Tom Tom's extended family - 'MAe-1WM Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal

recordings' (Board of Studies, 2012, p.45).

 

Link to pedagogical research:

Harrison (2011, p.63) states that students who comes from homes where parents who often reads to them have a better start in school. This suggests that reading to children is extremely crucial especially during Kindergarten, as it sets the foundation for literacy readiness. Rose (as cited in Harrison, 2011, p.93) found that students who has the most experience of written stories write most successfully and students who has less reading experiences are less successful. Reading an e-book like Tom Tom which has an Aboriginal perspective in it, is beneficial in that it could help to relate to an Aboriginal child in the class who has a similar background to Tom Tom and help them feel more confident, belonging and welcome in their classroom, which can generate a higher success in their learning. By reading the e-book to non-Aboriginal students, can help these students to gain a perspective of what an Aboriginal cultural family is like and appreciate their lifestyles and beliefs. By embedding Aboriginal perspectives in schools can help close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians (Department of Education and Training, 2014, para. 4).

 

References: 

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6: Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum: English K-10 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum" Mathematics K-10 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Harrison, N. (2011). Teaching and Learning in Aboriginal Education (2nd Edition). Victoria, Australia: Oxford University Press.

  

Department of Education and Training (2014). Embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspectives in schools: A guide for school learning communities. Retrieved April 09, 2014 from: http://deta.qld.gov.au/indigenous/pdfs/eatsips_2011.pdf.

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World Map

World Map | Family Origins, including Country of Origin - Early Stage 1 - Cultural Diversity: CUES1: Communicates some common characteristics that all people share, as well as some of the differences | Scoop.it
MapsofWorld.com provides free World map, high resolution digital map of the World, vector World maps & World Atlas for iPad, iPhone & Android phones. Maps of continents, countries and cities for students, teachers & travelers alike.
Maliya Shen's insight:

Description of resource:

This is a fantastic website  displaying a gigantic map, great for a whole class to view the whole world. Students can click on a country and that country will expand to show all the details of that country and provide further information on that country. This is a magnificent Global perspective resource as it helps children to comprehend family origins in an international planetary view of the topic and form an understanding or opinion of the Subject Matter "Family Origins, including Country of Origin".

 

A teaching idea:

Teachers can provide a collection of pictures and read texts of various families which come from different countries for example pictures of families around the world on this website:

http://gma.yahoo.com/photos/abc-news-families-across-world-slideshow/ld-food-one-week-mongolia-nt-130507-ssh-photo-161441966.html. Students can each take turns to click on these pictures to reveal the next picture, each picture is different and shows a family from a country in the world. Optionally, each student can point to the map to mark which country their family is from, which correlates with the content - 'identifies and gathers information about aspects of the cultural backgrounds of students in the class or school' of the outcome and subject matter (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p.28). The teacher can read a sentence describing that picture. The students then click on a country on the "World Map" to match the family of origin to their correct country of origin.

 

Assessment idea:

Teacher can bring in a chest of props for the kids to play dress-ups and get the children to do role-plays acting out their own family cultural backgrounds. They can be put into groups of four to carry out the role play. They can also locate their country of origin on the big World Map by sticking a tag with the name of their country on to the big map.

 

A literacy and numeracy strategy:

Literacy strategy - Students can be asked to write a story or one sentence on a chosen image of a country of their choice, depending on the child's ability level (eg, high ability students can write a story whereas low ability students can just write a sentence on a family image they select) - 'ENe-10C Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, simple ideas and the basic features of texts when responding to and composing texts' (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.48). After they have completed their writing task, they can come to the front and present it to the class.

 

Numeracy strategy - Numeracy skills are involved in these tasks as children learn how to count countries, count families stuck on the map and look at the distance involved between photos of family on the map - 'MAe-2WM Uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems' (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.45). By locating the family of origin on a world map, can empower students' geospatial awareness and conception (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 240).

 

Link to pedagogical research:

There is evidence that IWBs and other similar ICTs are powerful teaching tools due to features like clip art images, sound, animations, videos and hyperlinks proved to strengthen lessons, as teachers believe these characteristics captures children's attention, prolong concentration and increase motivation for learning (Wood & Ashfield, 2008, p.91). Thus, the web page of the "World Map" is an excellent resource for children.

Piaget and Lowenfield both advocated the importance of play in learning (Gitlin-Weiner, Sandground & Schaefer, 2000, pp.2-3).  Virginia Axline also advocated the importance of play for children to learn and as a tool for diagnostic assessment due to “…There is frankness, and honesty, and a vividness in the way children state themselves in a play situation. Their feelings, attitudes, and thoughts emerge, unfold themselves, twist and turn and lose their large edges…” (Gitlin-Weiner, Sandground & Schaefer, 200, p.3).

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6: Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum: English K-10 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum" Mathematics K-10 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th Edition). Victoria, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia Pty Ltd.

 

Gitlin-Weiner, K., Sandground, A. & Schaefer, C., (2000). Play Diagnosis and Assessment. (2nd Edition). Canada: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

 

Wood, R. & Ashfield, J. (2008). The use of the interactive whiteboard for creative teaching and learning in literacy and mathematics: a case study. British Journal of Educational Technology, 39, 84-96.

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Families of the World (YouTube) - Global Perspective

Families of the World (YouTube) - Global Perspective | Family Origins, including Country of Origin - Early Stage 1 - Cultural Diversity: CUES1: Communicates some common characteristics that all people share, as well as some of the differences | Scoop.it
Award winning and highly acclaimed Families of the World Series documents how children and their families live in each country. Families of the World takes y...
Maliya Shen's insight:

Description of resource:

The "Families of the World" series provides a global perspective through documentaries of how children and their families live in each country around the globe (eg, China, U.S.A, Australia, Egypt, Vietnam). For example, the documentary in China, shows a Chinese family consisting of a mother, father and a son (one child policy). Each morning the little boy must wake up early and reflects his daily life with his family. This film is a rich resource to show students how different families around the world live and their different daily practices. Each documentary is very short (around 2 minutes each or less), simple to understand and suitable for kindergarten students. This resource can help students meet the indicator 'identifies and gathers information about aspects of the cultural backgrounds of students in the class or school' (Board of Studies, 2006, p.28).

 

A teaching idea:

Before seeing the videos (perhaps just get the children to watch about six videos at a time as there are 58 videos in total), activate their prior knowledge of what a family is, ask students who has a family? Who are their family members? What are their household tasks? Why are families important? Are all families the same? Why? What do different families from around the world do each day? How are they different to your own families? Before putting up a video, explain to class what country the family is from (do this each time a different country is put up so they know which country the video Is from). After each video finishes, ask the class questions such as how many family members are in the video? What is she eating for breakfast? What kind of food is she eating? How is her school different to your school? How are they different to you? What does she do daily? What does the family do daily? How is he different to you? Provide the children with materials ( children can bring props from home) in a play area where they can explore different family situations such as meal times, going out, household tasks and interaction with general family members (Board of Studies NSW, 1998, p.31).This teaching idea connects with the content 'identifies and gathers information about aspects of the cultural backgrounds of students in the class or school' (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p.28)

 

Assessment task:

Prepare about six different photos of families from different countries of origin, then cut these up into four parts to create jigsaw puzzles. Provide each student with one of these jigsaw puzzles and tell them that they have to go around the classroom to find the other parts to their piece of the picture to complete their picture (Board of Studies NSW, 1998, p.183). When they do this they will form groups of four. Once they have done this the teacher will ask what country is the family from, so students must answer correctly. Instigate a class discussion with students about the families in their pictures, to analyse their knowledge and understanding of families from different countries around the world. Ask students what type of clothes are they wearing, how many members are in the family, what types of food do they eat.

 

A literacy and numeracy strategy:

Literacy strategy - Students can  write a sentence about the families in their pictures or a creative story surrounding the text, that must contain all the characters in the picture. After they have completed this they can present to the class - 'ENe-11D Responds to and composes simple texts about familiar aspects of the world and their own experiences' (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.50).

 

Numeracy strategy - Numeracy strategies can be embedded in the above tasks, such as getting the students to count how many family members are in each video of families from different countries 'MAe-2WM uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems' (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.45).

Additionally, by giving each student a part of a jigsaw puzzle will also embed numeracy strategies as students must count that there are four pieces per puzzle and makes four people in a group - 'MAe-2WM

uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems' (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.45). Teachers can get students to count how many pieces of puzzles to complete a puzzle and how many members in a group 'MAe-2WM

uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems' (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.45).

 

Link to pedagogical research:

Videos are critical instruments for teaching and learning particularly when most people prefer to ‘read’ visual texts more eagerly rather than written texts. Videos comprise a vital function by creating and circulating knowledge by reflection of the human experience (Connor & Bejoian, 2006, p. 53). For example these videos of families around the world can be easily related to majority of the audience in Kindergarten as it is targeted to them.

Moreover, the use of questioning throughout the investigative approach is important (Gall, 1970, p.707), questions play an important role in teaching. Tofade, Elsner & Haines (2013, p. 1) claims well-constructed questions lead to new insights, generate discussion, and promote the thorough exploration of subject matter. However, teachers must ask higher-order, divergent questions that promote deep thinking, requiring students to analyse and evaluate concepts.

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society in Its Environment K-6: Units of Work. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum: English K-10 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum" Mathematics K-10 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Connor, D. J. & Bejoian, L. M. (2006). Pigs, pirates, and pills: Using film to teach the social context of disability. Teaching Exceptional Children, 39, 52-60.

 

Tofade, T., Elsner, J. & Haines, S. T. (2013). Best Practice Strategies for Effective Use of Questions as a Teaching Tool. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 77, 1-9.

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