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Rail ticket machines to offer bitcoins - SWI swissinfo.ch

Rail ticket machines to offer bitcoins - SWI swissinfo.ch | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
Bitcoin users will soon be able to buy the digital currency from Swiss rail ticket machines. The pilot project starts on November 1
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Bill Gates tops Forbes 2016 list of world’s billionaires

Forbes magazine's 2016 list of billionaires features 1,810 billionaires around the world, down 16 from last year. Those billionaires have a total net wort
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The Brexit Breakup Brings New Opportunities

The Brexit Breakup Brings New Opportunities | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
The Brexit referendum result sparked market volatility, upending the status quo, but it is not all doom and gloom.
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Negative interest rates are scaring people

Negative interest rates are scaring people | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
Europe's negative interest rates are backfiring, warn prominent bankers Paul Achleitner of Deutsche Bank and Jeffrey Gundlach of DoubleLine Capital.
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Millennial Entrepreneurs Make More Money Than Their Older Peers

Millennial Entrepreneurs Make More Money Than Their Older Peers | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
Millennial entrepreneurs earn more money than their older peers, and are also more motivated by an effort to find their purpose and give back to society, according to a new report. “The new generation of millennial entrepreneurs are revolutionizing the nature of entrepreneurship,” says Nick Levitt, head of Global Solutions Group at HSBC Private Bank, in a statement announcing the release of a report outlining these findings. “These entrepreneurs are building bigger businesses and creating more jobs.” Millennial entrepreneurs were considered those under the age of 35 for the HSBC research, called the Essence of Enterprise report. Those millennial entrepreneurs surveyed by HSBC had businesses with annual revenues of $11.5 million, nearly one and a half times the $4.8 million average annual revenue of all the entrepreneurs surveyed for the report. Millennial entrepreneurs have more employees, too. The main business holding of an entrepreneur under the age of 35 included in this survey has 123 employees, compared with 58 employees in the main business holding of entrepreneurs over the age of 35. Related: 'Success Is Not a Number,' So Don't Chase Goals That Leave You Unsatisfied For the research, HSBC surveyed 2,834 entrepreneurs throughout the world. Entrepreneurs were tracked both by age and location. All of the entrepreneurs had a net worth between $250,000 and $20 million. To be included in the report, individuals had to be a major shareholder, manager, executive or strategic investor in a privately held business. Click to Enlarge+ Millennial entrepreneurs are running larger businesses with more employees than their larger counterparts, but making money isn’t their only concern. “They are as motivated to create an impact on the world as they are to make money and they are having a positive impact on their communities,” Levitt says. Almost six in 10 millennial entrepreneurs report that they want to have a positive impact on their communities. Meanwhile, nearly four in five, 79 percent, of millennial entrepreneurs are active philanthropists. And the more successful these millennial entrepreneurs are, the more they are giving back. Among those millennial entrepreneurs whose businesses are making more than $11.5 million in revenue, 89 percent report being actively involved in philanthropy in the past year. Related: To Pull Through Dark Days, Understand What Drives You For a deeper look at the characteristics and motivations of the global, millennial entrepreneur, have a look at the infographic summarizing findings from the report, embedded below. Click to Enlarge+
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At J.P. Morgan, $9 Million in Assets Isn’t Rich Enough

At J.P. Morgan, $9 Million in Assets Isn’t Rich Enough | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. is making its private bank even more private. Clients of the firm’s private bank later this year will be required to have at least $10 million in investible assets, twice the current minimum of $5 million, said people familiar with the matter. The move is one of the boldest yet among banks that are increasingly focused on managing the money of wealthy clients, who generate more fees and entail less...
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Ab Initio conseil, ingénierie patrimoniale et fiscale, à Genève

Ab Initio conseil est une société de conseil en ingénierie patrimoniale et fiscale, cession réorganisation, régularisation de comptes, basée à Genève en Suisse
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Exemple de régularisation fiscal d'actifs sur des comptes étrangers

 

La régularisation d’actifs, (comptes en banque) consiste à remettre le contribuable français dans la situation qui aurait été la sienne s’il avait dument déclaré ces actifs à l’impôt de solidarité sur la fortune (ISF) pour l’assiette et à l’impôt sur le revenu (IR) pour les revenus générés

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UBS, Citi Top Asia's Private Bank Rankings - Barron's

UBS, Citi Top Asia's Private Bank Rankings - Barron's | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
Asia’s private banks saw assets jump 18% in 2013. Local regional banks make inroads.
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Profits Jump 17% at Morgan Stanley Wealth Management - On Wall Street

Profits Jump 17% at Morgan Stanley Wealth Management - On Wall Street | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
Morgan Stanley Wealth Management saw profits jump 17% for the 3rd quarter, despite a 1% drop in the firm s advisor workforce.
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Wealth management a growing force in bank fortunes

Wealth management a growing force in bank fortunes | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
Wirehouses comprise a bigger portion of the revenue pie
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Higher Volatility Is Coming… Protect Client Portfolios Now - WealthManagement.com

Higher Volatility Is Coming… Protect Client Portfolios Now - WealthManagement.com | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
As market volatility declined through July to lows not seen in 10 years, investors should remember the old adages “nothing lasts forever” and “anything is possible.”
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Wealth management: A tougher game

Wealth management: A tougher game | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
While Beirut will likely remain a limited sub-center for wealth management for some time, its private bankers are keen to keep up with the latest trends.
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Why Wealthy Families Need A Family Office - Forbes

Why Wealthy Families Need A Family Office Forbes Coming from someone who leads a family office, anything beyond the headline would seem self-serving.
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How can a Management Buyout effect my Succession Planning? Business Law - Techopia

Visit: http://www.perlaw.ca/ Robert P. Kinghan is a Partner and Head of the Business Law Group at Perley-Robertson, Hill & McDougall LLP/s.rl. His practic
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Davos 2016 - Issue Briefing: Disruptive Forces in Financial Services

http://www.weforum.org/ Learn first-hand about the disruptive power of big data and automation in the context of financial services. Speakers: - John Flint
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Millionaires chalk success up to hard work and family values

Millionaires chalk success up to hard work and family values | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
The wealthiest Americans say it's not connections or talent that make you rich -- it's strong family values and hard work.
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Rothschild Bank Now Under Criminal Investigation After Baron David De Rothschild Indictment

Rothschild Bank Now Under Criminal Investigation After Baron David De Rothschild Indictment | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
The Swiss unit of Edmond de Rothschild said it’s the subject of a French probe regarding a former business relationship managed by a former employee. “Edmond de Rothschild (Suisse) SA is actively participating in the criminal investigation under way,” the Geneva-based bank said in an e-mailed statement on Friday. “The bank denies all the allegations that have been made against it.” Edmond de Rothschild, a private banking and asset management firm established in Paris in 1953, oversees about 150 billion euros ($164 billion) and is led today by Baron Benjamin de Rothschild and his wife Ariane. The Swiss unit traces its roots to the acquisition of Banque Privee in Geneva in 1965. The company has no further comment at this time, according to the statement. Officials in Geneva weren’t immediately available to respond to a telephone call from Bloomberg News on Friday.
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The American Dream remains within reach — in Switzerland

The American Dream remains within reach — in Switzerland | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
The American Dream is just that — a dream — for many young people in the U.S. today. As some presidential candidates have noted, particularly as they try to court younger voters, college-loan indebtedness and a skills gap are blocking many young Americans from reaching the middle class. Students are graduating with massive debts, parents can’t get their adult kids up and out of their basements, and businesses are frustrated about the skill sets of the workforce coming out of today’s schools. While the presidential debate focuses on how to handle student-loan indebtedness and whether college could be offered for free, another model — which is working well in Switzerland — should be considered. Students in Switzerland have a much easier path to the middle class. Yes, college is nearly free, and many would argue that model could be hard to duplicate in the U.S. But another big factor is that small nation’s dependence on business apprenticeships as an alternative to a four-year college degree. ‘Since young people get to build job skills and get paid while going to school part-time, they are more likely to stay in school.’ Donna Lynne, group president of Kaiser Permanente Health Plan and Kaiser Foundation Hospitals Notably, the program is not modeled after the American-style high school trades or community college curriculums to start a blue-collar job in, say, welding or plumbing, although classes and careers in those fields can be selected. Instead, it’s a fast-track into prestigious, high-paying careers in areas such as technology — everything from graphics software, video-game design and advanced computer programming. They are white-collar jobs. These apprenticeships also allow entry into banking, everything from analyzing stocks to wealth management. In Switzerland, the apprenticeship model is a popular option: About two-thirds of 15-year-old students elect to spend two to four years in Vocational Education and Training (VET). Students choose from more than 250 apprenticeship programs, creating an educational experience tailored to their interests and goals. They spend two days a week in a VET classroom and three days a week working at one of some 58,000 businesses in health care and retail, banking and engineering, as well as technology and other fields. Qualified apprentices, at the end of their training, receive a VET diploma, a signal of preparedness universally recognized by Swiss employers. Most move into jobs that average about $50,000 a year in salary to start. Roughly 30% of them go on to receive bachelor’s degrees or other advanced training, which increase their earnings power into the six figures. Need I ask: How many 18-year-old Americans would like that kind of start in life? Or how many businesses would like new hires who’ve been pre-trained and transitioned into the company? Some 71% of all young people in Switzerland expect to graduate from an apprenticeship program. The economic results: The unemployment rate for Swiss youth is less than 3%. In the U.S., the figure is about 12%. The trade-off: Businesses invest more than $5 billion a year in the program for instructors, materials as well as apprentices’ salaries. Several Swiss corporations with operations in my home state of Colorado, Novartis NVS, +1.14% Pilatus Aircraft and Mikron Group, are experimenting with this system, as is Nestle NESN, -0.49% Credit Suisse CS, -0.26% Zurich Insurance Group ZURN, -0.22% and several other Swiss-based companies in other states. Philip Kalin, the chief executive officer of Pinnacol Assurance, in Denver, recently told me he would love to get involved with setting up the Swiss model. “Not only will it help address issues of building a pipeline of workers,” he said, “but, more fundamentally, it can help create a pathway to solid middle-class jobs.” Another enthusiastic business leader, Donna Lynne, group president of Kaiser Permanente Health Plan and Kaiser Foundation Hospitals, added that the Swiss system has “de-stigmatized young people who choose a post-secondary career versus going to college.” Lynne also noted that the program could help deflate dropout rates, a huge problem in many states today. “Since young people get to build job skills and get paid while going to school part-time, they are more likely to stay in school,” she said. One obstacle to implementing this system in the States: a disturbing disconnect between what education leaders and business executives believe. Only 11% of business leaders, according to a 2013 Lumina Foundation/Gallup poll, strongly agree that graduating college students have the skills and competencies that their businesses need; 13% of the general public agree that students are well-prepared for success for the working world. Meanwhile, among chief academic officers at colleges and universities, 98% felt that students were very or well-prepared for work. The business sector also needs to be challenged. For some version of the Swiss system to succeed broadly in the U.S., corporations must change their role from being consumers of educated youth to producers of educated young people. Businesses will have to view training as a social responsibility and long-term economic necessity, too. Most training companies realize positive returns on their financial investments as they benefit from both increased productivity and the younger generation’s new ideas and high energy. Other resets also would be required. Parents and local governments would have to embrace private enterprise in the education sphere. More than anything, perhaps, mindsets must change. In particular, as Lynne noted, attitudes about the status, value and what encompasses “the trades” have to be rethought; perhaps we should call our apprentices “residencies.” After all, is a programmer’s labor much different from a mechanic’s nowadays? What job doesn’t involve computers or digital-technology competencies? America, if we don’t evolve in this direction, the American Dream will only truly be a reality for the youth in places outside of the United States. Scott Laband is president of Colorado Succeeds, a Denver-based nonprofit think tank that focuses on education and business issues. More from MarketWatch
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The 15 Most Profitable Small-Business Industries

The 15 Most Profitable Small-Business Industries | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
Being talented with numbers can really pay off if you’re looking to start a profitable business. Accounting and tax services takes the top spot on the list of the most profitable type of small business with a generous 18.4 percent net profit margin followed by real-estate services (15.2 percent), law firms (14.5 percent) and doctor’s offices (13 percent) reports Sageworks, a financial data service that analyzed the net profit margin of more than 16,000 small businesses (that earned less than $10 million) between September 2014 and August 2015. (The average net profit across all industries for this report's time period was 7.2 percent.) What makes these industries profitable? For one, they’re driven by human capital. “Service industries,” says Sageworks analyst Jenna Weaver, “are very common to find on the most profitable small-business list. This is generally due to lower overhead and startup costs. A lot of these industries you can start from your house.” While profit isn’t the only matter for an entrepreneur to consider -- other factors to consider are whether the business matches his or her skills, what sort of licensing or training is required and how the business would fare during a recession -- it’s an important place to start. Here’s the list of the 15 most profitable types of small businesses and their net profit margins. Related: The 10 Best Jobs in America for 2016 1. Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping and Payroll Services: 18.4% Image credit: Shutterstock “The accounting industry is consistently a top performer on our list,” says Sageworks’ Weaver. No matter how the economy is doing, everyone needs accountants. Also, this industry tends to have low overhead and repeat clients. 2. Management of Companies and Enterprises: 15.5% Image credit: Shutterstock This industry is made up of small, privately-owned offices of bank holding companies and other types of holding companies. Some well-known examples of holding companies (that do not fall into the small-business category) are Warren Buffet’s Berkshire Hathaway and Carl Icahn’s ICahn Enterprises. 3. Offices of Real Estate Agents and Brokers: 15.19% Image credit: Shutterstock While the real-estate market is largely dependent on the health of the economy, real-estate brokers and agents have low operating costs and all you need to get started is an agent or brokerage license. 4. Automotive Equipment Rental and Leasing: 14.55% Image credit: Shutterstock With the on-demand economy on the rise, Sageworks analyst Libby Bierman says that people may be leasing and renting more cars using on-demand services such as Zipcar -- along with more traditional rental services such as Herz. 5. Legal Services: 14.48% Image credit: Shutterstock Anyone who has ever hired a lawyer knows it’s not cheap. Law, like accounting, generally has low operating costs as well as repeat clients. However, this business category includes not only lawyers, but notaries, settlement officers (who deal in the transaction of securities) and title search agents in real estate. Related: The Most Profitable Types of Small Businesses 6. Offices of Dentists: 14.41% Image credit: Shutterstock Dentists, like physicians, benefit from recurring patients, and while startup costs can be expensive -- dental equipment is quite costly -- the profession has the advantage of handling several patients at a time, plus many pay out of pocket. 7. Electric Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution: 14.02% Image credit: Shutterstock This category of small, privately-held electric power companies includes not just your traditional, fossil fuel electric powers but also hydroelectric, nuclear, solar, wind, geothermal and more. 8. Lessors of Real Estate: 14.01% Image credit: Shutterstock Lessors, also known as landlords, show that renting both residential and nonresidential properties is a profitable gig once you recover the initial costs of purchase. 9. Offices of Other Health Practitioners: 13.30% Image credit: Shutterstock How is this category different from physicians? It’s not, really. There is a census delineation between chiropractors, optometrists, mental-health practitioners and podiatrists -- who fall under this category of “other health practitioners” -- and all other types of physicians. 10. Offices of Physicians: 13.01% Image credit: Shutterstock Being a doctor requires years of training, certification and likely, medical school debt. However, doctors also benefit from regular clients and relatively low overhead costs. Related: Need a Business Idea? Here are 55 11. Commercial and Industrial Machinery and Equipment Rental and Leasing: 12.58% Image credit: Shutterstock It pays to rent or lease. These businesses typically rent or lease commercial machinery and equipment across industries. 12. Religious Organizations: 12.41% Image credit: Shutterstock Religious organizations are having a profitable year. Really. Remember, being not-for-profit doesn't mean your goal shouldn't be to make a profit. It's just how you distribute those gains. Instead of giving profits to shareholders, all of yours go to your organization's mission, which is the furthering of your church's aims. It has been a good year not only for churches, synagogues, monasteries, mosques and temples, but also for schools, colleges and universities that are operated by religious organizations.  13. Management, Scientific and Technical Consulting Services: 12.05% Image credit: Shutterstock Some types of businesses that fall under this category are businesses that provide either management or consulting on a range of expertise, including human resources, marketing and environmental issues. 15. Office Administrative Services: 11.3% Image credit: Shutterstock These administrative businesses are the backbone of business operations across a variety of industries -- from food services to physicians offices -- and provide the day-to-day administrative services, such as record keeping, financial planning and billing. Related: The 10 Fastest-Growing Industries for Small Business 14. Specialized Design Services: 11.4% Small businesses that specialize in interior, industrial and graphic design are flourishing, as the value of a product or business’s function has become inextricably linked to appearance and design. This piece originally published February 1, 2016.
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Régularisation fiscale des comptes : La conformité des clients français sans rapatriement des comptes

La tentation d’user encore de son libre arbitre et de son libre choix avec une aventure de délocalisation panaméenne, par exemple, est vouée à l’échec: ce n’est qu’une question de timing ou de négociation jusqu’à ce que toutes les places soient couvertes par l’échange automatique d’informations

 

Dixit Bruno Richer, d'Ab Initio conseil, une société de conseil en ingénierie patrimoniale et fiscale, cession réorganisation, régularisation de comptes, basée à Genève en Suisse

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Credit Suisse Revamps Investment Bank Leadership - Wall Street Journal

Credit Suisse Revamps Investment Bank Leadership - Wall Street Journal | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
Credit Suisse seeks to zero in on new wealth being created in Asia, even as it pares other aspects of its global presence to cut costs and curb risk.
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How Wealth Management Firms Use Social Media to Improve Client Acquisition & Retention

How Wealth Management Firms Use Social Media to Improve Client Acquisition & Retention | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
Learn how you can integrate social media into your current marketing and sales, while staying compliant, in our demo, Utilizing Social for Wealth Management
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Opportunistic Acquisitions: Buying Assets Through Bankruptcy - Manufacturing Industry Advisor

Opportunistic Acquisitions: Buying Assets Through Bankruptcy - Manufacturing Industry Advisor | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
Though often overlooked, bankruptcy sales can be a real boon to businesses looking for a great deal.
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Why Wealth Managers Should Focus On Steady, Cash-Generative Businesses - NASDAQ

Why Wealth Managers Should Focus On Steady, Cash-Generative Businesses - NASDAQ | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
LONDON, Oct 10, 2014 - (ACN Newswire) - "In the low return environment that we foresee, there is a strong reason to refocus on 'Return of Capital and
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Wealth Management for Entrepreneurs: 6 Ways a Wealth Manager can Help you

Wealth Management for Entrepreneurs: 6 Ways a Wealth Manager can Help you | FAMILY OFFICE, PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT | Scoop.it
There are many reasons why entrepreneurs should consider making use of the services provided by a wealth manager. What can a wealth manager offer you?
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