Family-Centred Care Practice
105.8K views | +11 today
Follow
Family-Centred Care Practice
Dedicated to battling injustice of any form against children, youth, persons with disability and the elderly. Family-Centred Care Practice is the most ethically viable and cost-effective approach of service delivery.
Curated by Velvet Martin
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Samantha's Law

Samantha's Law | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
more...
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Elsie Paul | Where Are The Children

Elsie Paul | Where Are The Children | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
more...
Velvet Martin's comment, December 2, 3:25 AM
ELSIE PAUL
By admin | Published July 29, 2013
paul
THE INTERVIEWER: Could you please say and spell your whole name for us.
ELSIE PAUL: It’s Elsie Paul; E-l-s-i-e P-a-u-l.
Q. Thank you.
And where do you come from?
A. I’m from the Sliammon First Nations. It’s the Coast Salish. This is in Powell River. We are neighbours to the City of Powell River.
Q. Great. What school did you go to?
A. I went to a day school on the Reserve first of all when I was a little girl. It was kind of hit and miss because my grandparents travelled a lot up and down the coast. So when we were on the Reserve in the winter months I went to school there, a one-room day school. Then when I guess I was around ten I went to Sechelt Residential School.
Q. Okay.
A. I was in Sechelt for probably a year. But it turns out it was two years. They identified two years. So that was quite an experience because I had never been away from my grandparents up until then. I speak mostly our language of the Sliammon people, so adjusting to a totally different culture was very difficult for me and just being away from my grandparents who had always been there for me.
My grandparents took me when I was a new baby from my mom because I was the third baby. I was my mom’s third child. In our culture this quite often happened that grandparents helped with the grandchildren. And because my mom and my dad were moving away from the community, they were moving off to Port Alberni where my dad was going to go and work, my grandmother said to my mom that, you know, “you’ve got a handful, you’ve got a little toddler and the oldest being just over two”. We were all a year apart.
Q. Wow.
A. I being a new baby, my grandmother took me and named me after a child she lost who had gone to Residential School in Sechelt.
Q. Did she die in the school?
A. She did not die there, but she died shortly after they went and picked her up and brought her home. She was ten years old, nine or ten. So that was a terrible experience for my grandparents. She was younger than my mom.
My mom was in Residential School until she was sixteen. When she came out a couple of years later my aunt Elsie went to Residential School. She had never been away, of course, from home. My grandmother said she died of a broken heart.
By the time they let my grandparents know that she was very very sick, they finally got a hold of my grandparents and they went by boat, open boat, from our community, which is probably about fifty miles south along the coast to Sechelt, and they got to the beach there and my grandfather went up and picked her up. Nothing was ever said about what she was sick from or what kind of illness she had, but she had lost so much weight and she was really really ill. She couldn’t even walk. My grandfather had to carry her to the boat.
So they took her home. They of course rowed home, or whatever means they had. They got home and within a few days she passed away. So for my grandparents that was a real difficult experience for them. It was a tragedy. And from then on when I came along, they named me after that youngest daughter they had.
They refused to send me to Residential School. How they did that was by being absent from the community when the children were gathered and taken away to the Residential School. I guess once the school was filled to capacity they didn’t bother with the ones that they weren’t able to capture at the time. So my grandparents always made it a point to be away from the community when the round-up happened. So that went on until I was probably about ten years of age. And then I was sent there. I was pretty much forced to go.
It was difficult. It was difficult to be in that environment that had so many restrictions and being with people I didn’t know, other children I did not know at all. But I do remember some kids that came from another community north of us. I was a big sister to one little girl. She was very little. She must have been about five or six years old at the time. I remember her crying and being really sad. So I was made the big sister.
I was in the Intermediate Dormitory and she was in the Little Girls’ Dormitory. It was my job to look after her in the morning and get her dressed and to help her with her bath and stuff, and grooming. She didn’t have much hair after the initial entry into the school because, you know, they cut your hair off, so it was just a matter of taking care of her and looking after her. But I remember her crying all the time, being lonely. When you’re ten years old, how do you comfort another child? That’s what sticks in my mind about that time.
And kids never having enough to eat. I think back on those days and I wonder was it during the Depression. Was that why there was so little food? Was it because food was rationed at that time? I guess in my own mind I’m trying to justify or make excuses why we didn’t have enough food. There was plenty of food on the table of the people who looked after us. There was butter on that table. We had fat on our bread. That’s what they put on our bread, one slice of bread per meal. The spread that was on there was beef fat or pork fat. When you do your duty and go to clean up the table of the caregivers and you see a beautiful setting there and they have a good choice of food —
So when I think of all that I resent that. But I try to let it go. That was back a long time ago and I’ve learned to let it go. There’s nothing you can do about any of that any more.
I remember kids getting punished for wetting their bed and kids crying in the night, being sick, and no one to comfort them. I remember a lot of praying, constant praying.
Q. Was it Catholic or Anglican?
A. Catholic.
Q. Were there Nuns?
A. Nuns and a couple of Priests and a Brother I remember being there.
I remember being woken up by the Nuns clapping their hands to wake us up. That was our alarm. Without hesitation, without thinking, you dropped on your knees beside your bed and pray. You get up and you go to the washroom and get cleaned up, get your “care” child, the child you’re looking after, and you get her ready as well. You go back and make your bed. You go and help her make her bed. And the beds had to be done just so. This is very early in the morning.
Once the beds were all made up we were all lined up in the Dorm and you pray again before you leave that room. Then we go down to the Chapel and go to early Mass. We leave there and go have our breakfast, and then we pray again before breakfast. After breakfast we pray again.
Then we go into our classrooms. When you enter the classroom you pray again. When you leave the classroom to go out for recess, you pray again. So every time we entered a room or left a room, we have to pray. That was the whole day. It was just ongoing, constant. You didn’t mingle, you didn’t talk, until you were spoken to. You always had to line up.
I remember the food being so very different from what I was used to. The food was so foreign and I thought so terrible.
Q. What kind of food did you have at home?
A. Mostly we lived on game, deer meat, and a lot of seafood prepared traditionally. That was all I knew, my grandmother’s cooking. We had fried bread or oven bread, jam or dried fruits, dried meat, dried fish and clams. Those were all the foods I was familiar with. And to get there and to have a dish of some sort of stew put in front of me that I was not familiar with at all —
I always remember the food that was put in front of me. It must have been pork stew. I remember the rind being in the stew with the hair on it, with fur on it, and the child next to me was saying that you have to eat that food or else you’re going to be punished if you don’t. I think I blanked it out. I don’t know if I ate it.
And then there was custard. I had never had custard before, custard pudding. She kept telling me I had to eat it. In the meantime the Nun is walking back and forth watching over us. You can’t pass it on to anyone else. You have to eat it. So it’s pretty much forced down your throat. If you didn’t want it, that was too bad. You’re going to eat it.
Another thing I remember is being given cod liver oil every day. At mealtimes you go and line up. I always remember just dreading that moment of having to go and line up and the Nun would hold the plate in one hand and the can in the other hand. As you get up there you pick up that spoon that’s on the plate – we shared that one spoon – so you pick up that tablespoon while she pours cod liver oil in there. You have no choice. You take it.
I remember one time the spoon was so big and it’s so full that I just kind of turned it, you know, dumped out a little bit. Well, just for that I had to take two tablespoons. So you just didn’t go against the rules. That was the worst thing I remember, having to take that.
Q. What was the hardest part about Residential School for you?
A. Just being homesick. Just being homesick and missing my grandparents. It’s just so foreign and so different. It was such a different environment. We were cooped up and fenced in. I wasn’t used to that, not being able to go home. We were a distance away by boat and there wasn’t the road we have now whereby maybe they would be able to come and visit me by road if we had a road then. But it was by boat that they travelled.
So that is what I missed most of all, my grandparents, and the totally different lifestyle altogether.
Q. I would like to ask you Elsie, do you remember what years you were at school?
A. It was about 1941 and 1942.
Q. Thank you.
You only had to stay for two years, until you were about twelve.
A. Um-hmm.
Q. Do you know why you were allowed to not go any more?
A. Well, again, my grandparents left the community. My grandfather was a hand logger. He was a fisherman. And he pretty much lived off the land. He had a houseboat that he towed from one place to another up and down the coast, and we lived a lot on the houseboat. So when it was time to go to another logging show that he went to log, things were so different then that he could do that hand logging without having to work for a company, a logging company. He would send the logs down on skids and boom it up and send it away.
Or he’s just fishing. Dog fishing we called it. He would set out his line and I would go with him and bait the line and set it out. That’s how he made his living. They used to save the dogfish liver. That’s all you took and that was being processed, sent away, and he made $4 out of a four-gallon can. When he had about ten cans he would take it to market. That was one way for him to make a living.
He had a trap line so he had all these different kinds of activities, the kind of work he did, that’s what kept him away from the Reserve, so we only went back to the Reserve around Christmastime. In the fall time we would go back there. But they made it a point to be away from there come August, the end of August, to September.
Q. Did you go to school again after that?
A. No, I did not. I had a very limited education. I grew up and I learned from life experience.
Q. That’s a good education.
A. Yeah. I don’t —
Well, I shouldn’t say I don’t regret it. I do regret that I don’t have a formal education. But I did take upgrading. I did take upgrading. When I left school I was told I was at a Grade 4 level. So I took upgrading from then. It was difficult but I got my Grade 10 level. So that’s what I had.
And then I got a job as a Social Worker for my community, only because I could speak our language fluently I was given the job by our own people. I could speak fluently. It was very new to transfer the Social Work Program to the communities. So I acquired that job.
Before that I worked in other jobs like housekeeping and oyster shucking and jobs like that. I worked at the hospital in Powell River in housekeeping.
When I started Social Work then I got my Social Work degree, by attending classes at the University in Vancouver. I would go down there on weekends and do a Friday evening course, Saturday and half a day Sunday. Then I would go back home and continue my work. So that took quite a while. Back then you could get your Certificate with 200 merits, or whatever it was called then. Now I understand you can’t, so I was lucky to get that. So I did get my Social Work degree.
Q. How long have you been in Social Work?
A. I started to work for my community in ’72. That’s when I was hired.
Q. Wow.
A. I retired after twenty-four and a half years that I was a Social Worker for the Sliammon Indian Band, and also for the Hamalko (ph.) Band and the Klahoose (ph.) Band because we came under one administration. So I used to go up to the other two communities once a month to each community.
So after twenty-four years I couldn’t do it another day. I resigned. That was it.
Q. Do you think your experience in Residential School was helpful to you in your Social Work?
A. I really don’t know. I don’t know. I don’t think so. I think what helped me is the teachings from my grandmother and the other Elders in my community, and having been around them all the time when I was a little girl growing up and being around the Elders a lot, doing things, that was my classroom. That was my teaching. That, to me, is so very important still today, the teaching in our language. It’s called T’ao (ph.). It’s our T’ao. How to respect things, your boundaries, all these things were taught in a very good way from the Elders, to be respectful, to care for people and to look after yourself, because if you don’t look after yourself, no one is going to look after you. You have to get up early in the morning and be busy doing things and not to be lazy and to be industrious. So with all those things my days were busy. I was always busy.
And not only that, in the evenings we were told legends and stories and things like that. I was never read to as a child like we do with our grandchildren now with the books, and stuff. But it was all oral teaching. Some of the legends we were told were funny, but there was always a moral to the story. That’s where you learned how to respect the animals, how to respect other people, how to respect Mother Earth, and to be appreciative of all of the things the Creator has given you. So those were my teachings. I value those things. I value those teachings today.
So that’s basically it in a nutshell.
Q. Thank you. You have answered all of our questions.
Do you have anything else that you would like to share?
A. Well, I do appreciate what is taking place now. It’s a little late for a lot of our people, like my mom, for example. I’m sure life was hard on her. She went to Residential School through no fault of her own and I’m sure it was very difficult for her because she was there for years, and a lot of other people that I know in our community that have gone there. Some have had it worse than others.
So on behalf of my mother I wish she had this opportunity to be able to go through the healing that’s happening.
So, that’s it.
Q. Thank you so much.
— Speaker overcome with emotion
A. Sorry.
Q. There’s no need to be sorry. Take your time.
— A Short Pause
A. I guess for those reasons is why I’m really motivated to be a part of the healing, not just for myself but for other people, other people who have suffered so much more.
My late husband had a difficult life. He went to Residential School for several years. He used to talk about the punishment that he endured, the strappings, and he was not a happy man. He had a lot of problems. He had addictions, alcohol addiction. He didn’t know how to love and embrace the children. He loved them, but he didn’t know how to show it, or for me. That was something he learned in that institution.
I regret that. He used to say, “I don’t want to be that way. I love my children.” Because I would get after him, you know, you need to show your children you love them. He would say, “I love my children.” But he could not show it. He could not say it freely, but I know he did.
There’s so many like him. He would tell stories about the kids he was in school with, the boys, and how they got strapped just for stealing an apple because they were hungry. Some of them tried to run away and they would get strapped for two weeks every day as a lesson to the other kids. So he lived with all that.
So on his behalf, too, I’m glad this is happening.
Q. Thank you, Elsie. I want to give you something from us. This is from Manitoba. It’s a rock and we want to give it to you to thank you, and some tobacco as well.
A. Thank you so much. And thank you for the work you’re doing.
Q. Thank you so much.
A. Thank you.
— End of Interview
Velvet Martin's comment, December 2, 3:25 AM
ELSIE PAUL
By admin | Published July 29, 2013
paul
THE INTERVIEWER: Could you please say and spell your whole name for us.
ELSIE PAUL: It’s Elsie Paul; E-l-s-i-e P-a-u-l.
Q. Thank you.
And where do you come from?
A. I’m from the Sliammon First Nations. It’s the Coast Salish. This is in Powell River. We are neighbours to the City of Powell River.
Q. Great. What school did you go to?
A. I went to a day school on the Reserve first of all when I was a little girl. It was kind of hit and miss because my grandparents travelled a lot up and down the coast. So when we were on the Reserve in the winter months I went to school there, a one-room day school. Then when I guess I was around ten I went to Sechelt Residential School.
Q. Okay.
A. I was in Sechelt for probably a year. But it turns out it was two years. They identified two years. So that was quite an experience because I had never been away from my grandparents up until then. I speak mostly our language of the Sliammon people, so adjusting to a totally different culture was very difficult for me and just being away from my grandparents who had always been there for me.
My grandparents took me when I was a new baby from my mom because I was the third baby. I was my mom’s third child. In our culture this quite often happened that grandparents helped with the grandchildren. And because my mom and my dad were moving away from the community, they were moving off to Port Alberni where my dad was going to go and work, my grandmother said to my mom that, you know, “you’ve got a handful, you’ve got a little toddler and the oldest being just over two”. We were all a year apart.
Q. Wow.
A. I being a new baby, my grandmother took me and named me after a child she lost who had gone to Residential School in Sechelt.
Q. Did she die in the school?
A. She did not die there, but she died shortly after they went and picked her up and brought her home. She was ten years old, nine or ten. So that was a terrible experience for my grandparents. She was younger than my mom.
My mom was in Residential School until she was sixteen. When she came out a couple of years later my aunt Elsie went to Residential School. She had never been away, of course, from home. My grandmother said she died of a broken heart.
By the time they let my grandparents know that she was very very sick, they finally got a hold of my grandparents and they went by boat, open boat, from our community, which is probably about fifty miles south along the coast to Sechelt, and they got to the beach there and my grandfather went up and picked her up. Nothing was ever said about what she was sick from or what kind of illness she had, but she had lost so much weight and she was really really ill. She couldn’t even walk. My grandfather had to carry her to the boat.
So they took her home. They of course rowed home, or whatever means they had. They got home and within a few days she passed away. So for my grandparents that was a real difficult experience for them. It was a tragedy. And from then on when I came along, they named me after that youngest daughter they had.
They refused to send me to Residential School. How they did that was by being absent from the community when the children were gathered and taken away to the Residential School. I guess once the school was filled to capacity they didn’t bother with the ones that they weren’t able to capture at the time. So my grandparents always made it a point to be away from the community when the round-up happened. So that went on until I was probably about ten years of age. And then I was sent there. I was pretty much forced to go.
It was difficult. It was difficult to be in that environment that had so many restrictions and being with people I didn’t know, other children I did not know at all. But I do remember some kids that came from another community north of us. I was a big sister to one little girl. She was very little. She must have been about five or six years old at the time. I remember her crying and being really sad. So I was made the big sister.
I was in the Intermediate Dormitory and she was in the Little Girls’ Dormitory. It was my job to look after her in the morning and get her dressed and to help her with her bath and stuff, and grooming. She didn’t have much hair after the initial entry into the school because, you know, they cut your hair off, so it was just a matter of taking care of her and looking after her. But I remember her crying all the time, being lonely. When you’re ten years old, how do you comfort another child? That’s what sticks in my mind about that time.
And kids never having enough to eat. I think back on those days and I wonder was it during the Depression. Was that why there was so little food? Was it because food was rationed at that time? I guess in my own mind I’m trying to justify or make excuses why we didn’t have enough food. There was plenty of food on the table of the people who looked after us. There was butter on that table. We had fat on our bread. That’s what they put on our bread, one slice of bread per meal. The spread that was on there was beef fat or pork fat. When you do your duty and go to clean up the table of the caregivers and you see a beautiful setting there and they have a good choice of food —
So when I think of all that I resent that. But I try to let it go. That was back a long time ago and I’ve learned to let it go. There’s nothing you can do about any of that any more.
I remember kids getting punished for wetting their bed and kids crying in the night, being sick, and no one to comfort them. I remember a lot of praying, constant praying.
Q. Was it Catholic or Anglican?
A. Catholic.
Q. Were there Nuns?
A. Nuns and a couple of Priests and a Brother I remember being there.
I remember being woken up by the Nuns clapping their hands to wake us up. That was our alarm. Without hesitation, without thinking, you dropped on your knees beside your bed and pray. You get up and you go to the washroom and get cleaned up, get your “care” child, the child you’re looking after, and you get her ready as well. You go back and make your bed. You go and help her make her bed. And the beds had to be done just so. This is very early in the morning.
Once the beds were all made up we were all lined up in the Dorm and you pray again before you leave that room. Then we go down to the Chapel and go to early Mass. We leave there and go have our breakfast, and then we pray again before breakfast. After breakfast we pray again.
Then we go into our classrooms. When you enter the classroom you pray again. When you leave the classroom to go out for recess, you pray again. So every time we entered a room or left a room, we have to pray. That was the whole day. It was just ongoing, constant. You didn’t mingle, you didn’t talk, until you were spoken to. You always had to line up.
I remember the food being so very different from what I was used to. The food was so foreign and I thought so terrible.
Q. What kind of food did you have at home?
A. Mostly we lived on game, deer meat, and a lot of seafood prepared traditionally. That was all I knew, my grandmother’s cooking. We had fried bread or oven bread, jam or dried fruits, dried meat, dried fish and clams. Those were all the foods I was familiar with. And to get there and to have a dish of some sort of stew put in front of me that I was not familiar with at all —
I always remember the food that was put in front of me. It must have been pork stew. I remember the rind being in the stew with the hair on it, with fur on it, and the child next to me was saying that you have to eat that food or else you’re going to be punished if you don’t. I think I blanked it out. I don’t know if I ate it.
And then there was custard. I had never had custard before, custard pudding. She kept telling me I had to eat it. In the meantime the Nun is walking back and forth watching over us. You can’t pass it on to anyone else. You have to eat it. So it’s pretty much forced down your throat. If you didn’t want it, that was too bad. You’re going to eat it.
Another thing I remember is being given cod liver oil every day. At mealtimes you go and line up. I always remember just dreading that moment of having to go and line up and the Nun would hold the plate in one hand and the can in the other hand. As you get up there you pick up that spoon that’s on the plate – we shared that one spoon – so you pick up that tablespoon while she pours cod liver oil in there. You have no choice. You take it.
I remember one time the spoon was so big and it’s so full that I just kind of turned it, you know, dumped out a little bit. Well, just for that I had to take two tablespoons. So you just didn’t go against the rules. That was the worst thing I remember, having to take that.
Q. What was the hardest part about Residential School for you?
A. Just being homesick. Just being homesick and missing my grandparents. It’s just so foreign and so different. It was such a different environment. We were cooped up and fenced in. I wasn’t used to that, not being able to go home. We were a distance away by boat and there wasn’t the road we have now whereby maybe they would be able to come and visit me by road if we had a road then. But it was by boat that they travelled.
So that is what I missed most of all, my grandparents, and the totally different lifestyle altogether.
Q. I would like to ask you Elsie, do you remember what years you were at school?
A. It was about 1941 and 1942.
Q. Thank you.
You only had to stay for two years, until you were about twelve.
A. Um-hmm.
Q. Do you know why you were allowed to not go any more?
A. Well, again, my grandparents left the community. My grandfather was a hand logger. He was a fisherman. And he pretty much lived off the land. He had a houseboat that he towed from one place to another up and down the coast, and we lived a lot on the houseboat. So when it was time to go to another logging show that he went to log, things were so different then that he could do that hand logging without having to work for a company, a logging company. He would send the logs down on skids and boom it up and send it away.
Or he’s just fishing. Dog fishing we called it. He would set out his line and I would go with him and bait the line and set it out. That’s how he made his living. They used to save the dogfish liver. That’s all you took and that was being processed, sent away, and he made $4 out of a four-gallon can. When he had about ten cans he would take it to market. That was one way for him to make a living.
He had a trap line so he had all these different kinds of activities, the kind of work he did, that’s what kept him away from the Reserve, so we only went back to the Reserve around Christmastime. In the fall time we would go back there. But they made it a point to be away from there come August, the end of August, to September.
Q. Did you go to school again after that?
A. No, I did not. I had a very limited education. I grew up and I learned from life experience.
Q. That’s a good education.
A. Yeah. I don’t —
Well, I shouldn’t say I don’t regret it. I do regret that I don’t have a formal education. But I did take upgrading. I did take upgrading. When I left school I was told I was at a Grade 4 level. So I took upgrading from then. It was difficult but I got my Grade 10 level. So that’s what I had.
And then I got a job as a Social Worker for my community, only because I could speak our language fluently I was given the job by our own people. I could speak fluently. It was very new to transfer the Social Work Program to the communities. So I acquired that job.
Before that I worked in other jobs like housekeeping and oyster shucking and jobs like that. I worked at the hospital in Powell River in housekeeping.
When I started Social Work then I got my Social Work degree, by attending classes at the University in Vancouver. I would go down there on weekends and do a Friday evening course, Saturday and half a day Sunday. Then I would go back home and continue my work. So that took quite a while. Back then you could get your Certificate with 200 merits, or whatever it was called then. Now I understand you can’t, so I was lucky to get that. So I did get my Social Work degree.
Q. How long have you been in Social Work?
A. I started to work for my community in ’72. That’s when I was hired.
Q. Wow.
A. I retired after twenty-four and a half years that I was a Social Worker for the Sliammon Indian Band, and also for the Hamalko (ph.) Band and the Klahoose (ph.) Band because we came under one administration. So I used to go up to the other two communities once a month to each community.
So after twenty-four years I couldn’t do it another day. I resigned. That was it.
Q. Do you think your experience in Residential School was helpful to you in your Social Work?
A. I really don’t know. I don’t know. I don’t think so. I think what helped me is the teachings from my grandmother and the other Elders in my community, and having been around them all the time when I was a little girl growing up and being around the Elders a lot, doing things, that was my classroom. That was my teaching. That, to me, is so very important still today, the teaching in our language. It’s called T’ao (ph.). It’s our T’ao. How to respect things, your boundaries, all these things were taught in a very good way from the Elders, to be respectful, to care for people and to look after yourself, because if you don’t look after yourself, no one is going to look after you. You have to get up early in the morning and be busy doing things and not to be lazy and to be industrious. So with all those things my days were busy. I was always busy.
And not only that, in the evenings we were told legends and stories and things like that. I was never read to as a child like we do with our grandchildren now with the books, and stuff. But it was all oral teaching. Some of the legends we were told were funny, but there was always a moral to the story. That’s where you learned how to respect the animals, how to respect other people, how to respect Mother Earth, and to be appreciative of all of the things the Creator has given you. So those were my teachings. I value those things. I value those teachings today.
So that’s basically it in a nutshell.
Q. Thank you. You have answered all of our questions.
Do you have anything else that you would like to share?
A. Well, I do appreciate what is taking place now. It’s a little late for a lot of our people, like my mom, for example. I’m sure life was hard on her. She went to Residential School through no fault of her own and I’m sure it was very difficult for her because she was there for years, and a lot of other people that I know in our community that have gone there. Some have had it worse than others.
So on behalf of my mother I wish she had this opportunity to be able to go through the healing that’s happening.
So, that’s it.
Q. Thank you so much.
— Speaker overcome with emotion
A. Sorry.
Q. There’s no need to be sorry. Take your time.
— A Short Pause
A. I guess for those reasons is why I’m really motivated to be a part of the healing, not just for myself but for other people, other people who have suffered so much more.
My late husband had a difficult life. He went to Residential School for several years. He used to talk about the punishment that he endured, the strappings, and he was not a happy man. He had a lot of problems. He had addictions, alcohol addiction. He didn’t know how to love and embrace the children. He loved them, but he didn’t know how to show it, or for me. That was something he learned in that institution.
I regret that. He used to say, “I don’t want to be that way. I love my children.” Because I would get after him, you know, you need to show your children you love them. He would say, “I love my children.” But he could not show it. He could not say it freely, but I know he did.
There’s so many like him. He would tell stories about the kids he was in school with, the boys, and how they got strapped just for stealing an apple because they were hungry. Some of them tried to run away and they would get strapped for two weeks every day as a lesson to the other kids. So he lived with all that.
So on his behalf, too, I’m glad this is happening.
Q. Thank you, Elsie. I want to give you something from us. This is from Manitoba. It’s a rock and we want to give it to you to thank you, and some tobacco as well.
A. Thank you so much. And thank you for the work you’re doing.
Q. Thank you so much.
A. Thank you.
— End of Interview
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Alberta government setting up all-party committee to examine child’s death in kinship care

Alberta government setting up all-party committee to examine child’s death in kinship care | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
The Alberta government is setting up an all-party committee to explore the circumstances surrounding the death of four-year-old girl who was in government care.
more...
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Written for Serenity

Written for Serenity | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
Written for Serenity by Julie Ali Wednesday, November 30, 2016 and if we can't end the genocide let us at least bear witness and when you see another child vanishing when you see the child abused and harmed while the government mouths platitudes when you see the citizens speak about the horror and then forget when you see the sea of indifference don't give up or give in instead speak for years and decades as Ruth Adria has done let the horror wake you up to the elite who reside in government let the elite vanish as the child vanishes let us use our votes well and if we can't end the genocide let us at least bear witness and when you see another child vanishing when you see the child abused and harmed while the government mouths platitudes when you see the citizens speak about the horror and then forget when you see the sea of indifference don't give up or give in here is Serenity who lived a life truncated and fragmented and here is the child who was tasered meanwhile the guardians aren't held accountable or face legal consequences for their failures to parent but of course if this happened in the family we get to go to jail for neglect and death government gets an emergency debate for the deaths of children and when you see another child vanishing when you see the child abused and harmed while the government mouths platitudes when you see the citizens speak about the horror and then forget when you see the sea of indifference don't give up or give in
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Regina theatre group needs 14K to perform in first-ever deaf theatre festival in Alta.

Regina theatre group needs 14K to perform in first-ever deaf theatre festival in Alta. | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
The play was created and performed by members of Regina's deaf community. Performers use miming, puppetry and American Sign Language as their mode of storytelling.
more...
Velvet Martin's comment, November 29, 9:43 PM
CANADA
November 29, 2016 7:19 pm Updated: November 29, 2016 8:03 pm
Regina theatre group needs 14K to perform in first-ever deaf theatre festival in Alta.

By Christa Dao
Reporter Global News














WATCH ABOVE: A Regina theatre group is hoping to head to Alberta to perform at an Edmonton theatre festival. But as Christa Dao explains, both the play and the festival is something completely out of the ordinary.

Deaf Crows isn’t your typical theatrical play – it’s probably the opposite. It’s one with no talking scripts, no music and it is completely silent.

The play was created and performed by members of Regina’s deaf community. Performers use miming, puppetry and American Sign Language as their mode of storytelling.

Deaf Crows delves into the lives of people growing up deaf, in an audible world. Over the summer, the group performed to sold out crowds in Regina.

Story continues below

Global News
“We performed for people in June here in Regina and the performances were sold out. We decided to add another night and people were so touched and they were crying,” teacher and co-director Joanne Weber said.

READ MORE: How a deaf dog, once thought untrainable, won the Agility Trial Champion of Cana

Now, Deaf Crows is invited to Edmonton to the first-ever deaf theatre festival in Canadian history — “Sound Off”.

But the cost is proving to be a barrier. The group needs to raise $14,000 to get there.

“Oh, we have concerns of course but I know that people have good hearts and people will understand that it’s really important to have that opportunity… [because] the deaf community have limited choices in the world,” Weber said.

For student performer Shayla Rae Tanner, the chance to perform in another city brings a mix of emotions.

“I’m both excited and nervous for the acting that we have to do in front of a big audience,” Tanner said.

Another performer, Fatima Tun Nafisa also echoed those thoughts.

“Very very nervous. All these people will be watching me,” she said.

Artist-in-Residence Chrystene Ells said it’s not just acting for the performers. The trip would be beneficial in more ways than one.

“For them, they’re the only deaf theatre company that they know,” Ells said.

“For them to step outside of this small space and see there’s a whole world of deaf art and deaf theatre and deaf events and a larger deaf community, it is such a huge opportunity,” she said.

They’re hoping to raise enough money on their GoFundMe page to send them to Alberta’s capital. Their deadline to raise the money is Dec. 15, 2016.

The deaf theatre festival in Edmonton runs from Feb.9 to Feb.19, 2017.

© 2016 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Velvet Martin's comment, November 29, 9:47 PM
http://deafcrows.wixsite.com/deafcrows
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Q & A vaccines 

Q: So you're an anti-vaxxer now?
A: Yes.
Q: Don't you worry about your child getting sick from vaccine preventable diseases?
A: No, not really. I actually have less fear of many of those illnesses now that I've done my research.
Q: But what about polio?
A: There have been no Polio cases in the US since 1979! Why are we still vaccinating for a disease that doesn't exist here? However, Polio is asymptomatic in over 95% of cases. When symptoms do present, they're usually mild and flu-like.
Q: But we don't see iron lungs anymore because of vaccines.
A: We don't see iron lungs anymore for the same reason we don't see computers that are large enough to take up an entire room. Technology has come a long way.
Q: But even if the risk of getting something serious is small, don't you want to protect your child with vaccines just in case?
A: I do want to protect my child, and that is one reason I say no to vaccines. Because in my cost-benefit analysis, the chances of my child being harmed from vaccines is greater than the chances of my child being harmed from one of those illnesses.
Q: But it's not just about your child. It is your responsibility to vaccinate your child to protect immune compromised people through herd immunity.
A: First and foremost, my responsibility is to my child. I will not set my child on fire to keep someone else warm. What parent would knowingly risk their child's life for the sake of the herd? Would you? My child is not a human shield. Secondly, herd immunity is a myth. We do not have vaccine induced herd immunity and never have.
Q: But don't you think vaccines are a victim of their own success? They eradicated polio and other diseases, so you probably haven't seen them thanks to vaccines.
A: Correlation does not equal causation. The history of vaccines is more complex than that, and I no longer believe that vaccines can take the credit for eradicating any diseases. We have never had widespread vaccination for scarlet fever or typhoid, yet, they are no longer a threat. Amazing what sanitation can do. Polio has also not been eradicated. I may not have lived through the "polio" era, but I am living in a time with a different kind of epidemic. My child's generation is the first to have a life expectancy that is less than that of their parents. People are sicker than ever with autoimmune diseases, deadly allergies, neurological problems, and cancer. We can not cling to a controversial problem of the past to make crucial decisions for today. We have to do something about the problems we are currently faced with, and giving more vaccines is not an acceptable solution.
Q: Do the ingredients in vaccines concern you?
A: Yes
Q: You know there's formaldehyde in pears, right? And mercury in tuna?
A: When's the last time you puréed a pear and some tuna, then injected it intramuscularly? We have a digestive system for a reason, and the mucosal tissue is one of the most important components of the human immune system. I don't think bypassing those functions is without consequence. Ingestion and injection are not the same thing. It's the same reason you can drink snake venom, but being bitten in the leg with the same venom can kill you.
Q: But the science is settled and doctors and scientists agree that vaccines are necessary.
A: Science is never settled. As history has shown, science can be dangerously wrong. It can also be heavily influenced by financial interests. And doctors and scientists do not all agree about vaccines. There are many doctors, nurses, immunologists, and researchers who are aware of the shortcomings of vaccines. And if we want to really discuss vaccine science, we need to demand that there be more of it, because vaccine science is severely lacking. It is the tobacco science of our time. The current vaccine schedule (which has more than tripled since vaccine manufacturers became protected from liability) has never been tested for safety. There hasn't been a randomized double blind placebo controlled study comparing the outcomes of the vaccinated vs. unvaccinated. Vaccines are the epitome of quackery." by Erin Fielding
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Failing to provide the necessaries of life 

Failing to provide the necessaries of life  | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/calgary/meningitis-stephan-trial-necessaries-of-life-cases-1.3557437

Failing to provide the necessaries of life: More recent Alberta cases
Yes, the official charge uses the word 'necessaries,' not 'necessities,' and yes, that is actually a noun

CBC News
1 Hour Ago
Tamara and Ryan Lovett collage
Tamara Lovett, left, is going on trial for refusing to take her son, Ryan Lovett, 7, to a doctor. Ryan died in 2013. (Youtube)
1.3k shares
The phrase "failing to provide the necessaries of life" is back in the public discourse this week, with the trial of Tamara Lovett, who turned to holistic medicine before the death of her seven-year-old son Ryan Alexander Lovett.

Ryan died in March 2013, after Lovett tried to treat his strep infection with alternative medicines instead of being taken to a doctor, police allege.

The boy had been bedridden for 10 days.

Boy whose meningitis treated with dandelion tea lived in 'squalor', court hears at mother's trial

Alberta to review naturopathic regulations in light of toddler death

Eight months after Ryan's death, his mother was arrested and charged with criminal negligence causing death and failing to provide the necessaries of life.

This is far from the only criminal case in Alberta involving parents accused of failing to seek medical help for their children.

Earlier this year, the parents of 19-month-old Ezekiel Stephan were found guilty of failing to provide the necessaries of life to the toddler, who died from bacterial meningitis.

Parents of two other people who died in Alberta — one child and one adult with disabilities — currently face charges of failing to provide the necessaries of life.

'Necessaries' vs. 'necessities'

Although unusual in everyday parlance, the word "necessaries" — not "necessities" — is the term the legal system uses and is, in fact, an actual noun.

This is the precise wording of section 215 (1) of the Criminal Code of Canada:

Every one is under a legal duty
(a) as a parent, foster parent, guardian or head of a family, to provide necessaries of life for a child under the age of sixteen years;
(b) to provide necessaries of life to their spouse or common-law partner; and
(c) to provide necessaries of life to a person under his charge if that person
(i) is unable, by reason of detention, age, illness, mental disorder or other cause, to withdraw himself from that charge, and
(ii) is unable to provide himself with necessaries of life.
The Merriam-Webster Dictionary also recognizes the word "necessary" and its plural, "necessaries," as a noun, despite the word typically being used as an adjective.

It defines "the necessary" as "whatever is needed for some purpose" and "necessaries" as "things (such as food, a place to live, and clothing) that you must have."

John Clark


hi-calgary-courts-centre-8521
Jeromie Clark and his wife, Jennifer, face charges of failing to provide the necessaries of life and criminal negligence causing death after their 14-month-old, John Clark, died in 2013.

The medical examiner found the cause of death to be a staph infection complicated by malnutrition.

At the time of the couple's arrest, police said the family — who claim to be Seventh-day Adventists — followed a strict diet based on an extreme interpretation of the religion.

Police began investigating after the parents brought John to hospital on Nov. 28, 2013, where he was treated but died the following day.

Police said John was born at home and had never been to a doctor previously. They allege the parents took steps to conceal his condition from other family members.

A jury trial is set for next June.

Melissa Couture


Calgary police Insp. Don Coleman
Insp. Don Coleman said investigations into cases of failing to provide the necessaries of life are complex and difficult for all involved. (CBC)
Patricia Couture, 68, was charged with failing to provide the necessaries of life to her 38-year-old disabled daughter, Melissa, who died on April 26.

Police and paramedics found Melissa unresponsive when they responded to the family's home in the southwest community of Woodlands at about 3 a.m. that day.

Melissa was pronounced dead shortly afterward, and Patricia was arrested.

Calgary police Insp. Don Coleman said it's a difficult case for everyone involved, but investigators had grounds to lay the charge.

"In Canada, there is a reasonable expectation of care to be provided to those who can't care for themselves," he said. "So it would appear this hasn't been met."

A neighbour who knows the family said Patricia was a single parent to Melissa, who he described as "mentally challenged and unable to hear or speak."

Ezekiel Stephan

Ezekiel David Collet Stephan
David and Collet Stephan were found guilty of failing to provide the necessaries of life to their son, Ezekiel in April 2016. (Facebook/CBC)
In April, David and Collet Stephan were found guilty of failing to provide the necessaries of life in relation to the death of their 19-month-old son, Ezekiel.

A jury convicted the mother and father after they opted for natural remedies as Ezekiel's health worsened from meningitis, only taking him to an actual physician after he had stopped breathing.

David Stephan was sentenced to four months in jail and his wife to three months of house arrest.

They have been released pending an appeal by the Crown over the sentence and by the defence, which is appealing the
conviction.

Alex Radita

Alex Radita and parents
Alex Radita, 15, weighed less than 40 lbs when he died. His parents, Emil and Rodica, are accused of refusing to treat his diabetes and neglecting the child. (Court exhibit/Facebook)
​The 15-year-old was found dead in his Calgary home in May 2013 after a call to EMS.

He weighed 37 pounds when he died of starvation and complications from untreated diabetes.

His parents, Emil and Rodica Radita, were charged with first-degree murder.

Court has heard that the parents refused to accept Alex had diabetes and withheld insulin from him.

The trial and sentencing arguments have concluded. A verdict is expected early in the new year.

With files from The Canadian Press

more...
Velvet Martin's comment, November 28, 3:46 PM
Charges for failure to provide the necessaries of life - although legislated otherwise - are not applicable to Government employees.

Kathi Campbell, CYFA Investigator Edmonton Region 6: "Can we, the Department, take action against a foster family? I don't think so. Kinda our employee." (Taped conversation provided to Police.)
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Nearly 400 children rescued and 348 adults arrested in Canadian child pornography bust 2013

Nearly 400 children rescued and 348 adults arrested in Canadian child pornography bust 2013 | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
Nearly 400 children have been rescued and 348 adults arrested following an expansive and “extraordinary” international child pornography investigation, Canadian police announced Thursday.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Former Mission school principal charged with child luring after 'creep catchers' sting

Former Mission school principal charged with child luring after 'creep catchers' sting | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
Former principal of a Mission school charged with child luring after Fraser Valley Creep Catchers aired confrontation at an Abbotsford mall
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Edmonton grandmother speaks out about child welfare system after frustrating battle | Metro Edmonton

Edmonton grandmother speaks out about child welfare system after frustrating battle | Metro Edmonton | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
'When Serenity’s story came up, I got to thinking, that easily could have been my granddaughter.'
more...
Velvet Martin's comment, November 27, 5:24 PM
http://www.metronews.ca/news/edmonton/2016/11/25/edmonton-grandma-questions-child-welfare-system-after-battle.html

Edmonton grandmother speaks out about child welfare system after frustrating battle
'When Serenity’s story came up, I got to thinking, that easily could have been my granddaughter.'
Kevin Tuong/For Metro
An Edmonton grandmother Metro is not identifying to protect her granddaughter's identity says the child welfare system needs changes.
Published on Nov 25 2016
Kevin Maimann
METRO
An Edmonton woman is calling for changes to the child welfare system after a months-long fight to regain custody of her three-year-old granddaughter.
Rachel, whose name Metro is changing to protect her granddaughter’s identity, says she fought for months and went to court to get the toddler back from a government foster home.
“I can see why children get lost in the children’s services system. I can see why now,” she said.
“If you don’t have the stubbornness to fight them – at one point I was ready to give up, I will be honest with you, because I was having so many problems.”
ADVERTISEMENT

Rachel lived with Sarah, who's her daughter and also mother of Rachel's granddaughter, who Metro will call Michelle.
Rachel says she initially called Child Protective Services because Sarah was addicted to meth, neglecting Michelle, and periodically taking the toddler to live with friends or boyfriends.
“There were quite a few frightful situations where I went and picked my granddaughter up and couldn’t believe the condition that she was in,” Rachel said.
“It’s not something I wanted to do, but at the same time my granddaughter was suffering at the hands of my daughter in the drug world.”
But instead of following up, Rachel says child protection workers signed an agreement with Sarah to have Michelle taken to a foster home in Ardrossan, and took her on June 6.
When Rachel called the Office of the Child and Youth Advocate the next day, she says her concerns were not addressed.
Wherever she turned within the child intervention system, she says she felt ignored.
“They treated me like I was the meth head, and not the person that’s been sober and clean for 10 years, not the person that’s had a stable home for 10 years,” she said.
Rachel had to fight for rare visits with Michelle, with help from Métis Child and Family Services.
She knew little about the family caring for her granddaughter, and was worried Michelle was missing love and affection, as well as indigenous cultural experiences.
“She missed out on round dances, she missed out on powwows, she missed out on morning smudges,” Rachel said.
Rachel finally got a court date in November after finding a lawyer through Legal Aid.
A judge awarded joint guardianship to her and Michelle’s father, who lives in Good Fish Lake.
Rachel reached out to Metro after reading about the tragic story of four-year-old Serenity, who died while in kinship care after suffering severe physical abuse.
“There needs to be changes, bad, because our children have no voice and they’re the ones that are suffering,” Rachel said.
“When Serenity’s story came up, I got to thinking, that easily could have been my granddaughter.”
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Paula Simons: Chaos, short-staffing in medical examiner's office put justice at risk

Paula Simons: Chaos, short-staffing in medical examiner's office put justice at risk | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
Twenty-five per cent of autopsies in Alberta now take six months or more to complete.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Foster parents negligent in drowning death, says DSS

Foster parents negligent in drowning death, says DSS | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
DSS says this investigation revealed physical neglect by lack of oversight by the foster parents, causing Za'Marion's death.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

A plea for help: Edmonton mom struggles to find mental health resources for her son | Metro Edmonton

A plea for help: Edmonton mom struggles to find mental health resources for her son | Metro Edmonton | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
Says 16-year-old was sent home from hospital following suicide attempt.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Children in provincial care need better protection from online sexual exploitation: Alberta advocate

Children in provincial care need better protection from online sexual exploitation: Alberta advocate | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
Alberta's child and youth advocate is calling on the province to improve services to protect children in provincial care from online sexual exploitation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

All-party committee to investigate Alberta children in care

All-party committee to investigate Alberta children in care | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
"If we can’t take the time to work together to keep them safe ... then I think we should all be ashamed."
more...
Velvet Martin's comment, December 2, 2:36 AM
https://www.google.ca/amp/edmontonjournal.com/news/politics/all-party-committee-to-investigate-alberta-children-in-care/amp

All-party committee to investigate Alberta children in care
BY EMMA GRANEY
ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED: DEC 1, 2016

The death of Serenity, shown as a happy toddler riding her trike, has prompted MLAs to form an all-party committee to look...
/ Supplied

Email

Twitter

Facebook

Pinterest

Google+

Linkedin
Ric McIver says Albertans would never forgive their government if all sides of the house didn’t put down their swords and work together to fix the child welfare system.

Thursday’s decision by government to take up his suggestion of an all-party committee to investigate the system’s flaws is something for which McIver sent Premier Rachel Notley a thank-you note.

“I don’t think the world has any patience for members of the legislative assembly yelling back and forth at each other while children in our care could be in peril or even dying,” said McIver, the acting leader of the Alberta Progressive Conservative party.


“If we can’t take the time to work together to keep them safe, and try to find out what is causing them to be unsafe and sometimes die, then I think we should all be ashamed.”

Human Services Minister Irfan Sabir said that work will begin as soon as practical, with the committee to be convened in a number of days.

The death of four-year-old Serenity, a child in kinship care, has been brought up time and again in the legislative assembly after Edmonton Journal columnist Paula Simons exposed the injuries sustained by the tiny, malnourished girl before her 2014 death.

Sabir said the province needs to come up with better safeguards to avoid deaths like Serenity’s, and that’s what the committee will work toward.

“We want to come up with a plan and look into this issue in a way that we can have the public’s trust and confidence going forward,” Sabir told Postmedia.

“It’s an issue that we take very seriously, an issue that we are deeply concerned about, that the whole house is concerned about.”

egraney@postmedia.com
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Class Action deadline 

February 28, 2017 is the deadline to ask for money from the Schedule 1 class action settlement.

If you lived somewhere on the list below, check the dates beside the name of the place where you lived. If you lived there between those dates, then you may be able to get money from the settlement.

• St. Lawrence Regional Centre in Brockville between April 1, 1975 and June 30, 1983

• D’Arcy Place in Cobourg between September 1, 1963 and December 31, 1996

• Adult Occupational Centre in Edgar between January 1, 1966 and March 31, 1999

• Pine Ridge in Aurora between September 1, 1963 and August 31, 1984

• Muskoka Centre in Gravenhurst between August 28, 1973 and June 30, 1993

• Oxford Regional Centre in Woodstock between April 1, 1974 and March 31, 1996 or in the “Mental Retardation Unit” or “MR Unit” of the Oxford Mental Health Centre between January 1, 1969 and March 31, 1974

• Midwestern Regional Centre in Palmerston between September 1, 1963 and March 31, 1998

• L.S. Penrose Centre in Kingston between April 1, 1974 and March 31, 1977

• Bluewater Centre in Goderich between April 1, 1976 and December 20, 1983

• Durham Centre for Developmentally Handicapped in Whitby between April 1, 1974 and September 28, 1986

• Prince Edward Heights in Picton between January 1, 1971 and December 31, 1999

• Northwestern Regional Centre in Thunder Bay between April 1, 1974 and March 31, 1994

You do not need to go to court to make a claim. You just need to fill in a claim form. A support person can fill it in for you, but the cheque will have your name on it.

You could get up to $2000 if you were harmed or hurt at a place on the list. You could get up to $42,000 if you write about how you were harmed or hurt. The money does not affect ODSP and you do not need to pay tax on it.

To get claim forms go to http://www.schedule1facilities.ca/documents.html .

To read a book about how to make a claim, go to http://www.schedule1facilities.ca/assets/revised_detailed_nonbooklet_notice.pdf .

The website for the claims process is: www.schedule1facilities.ca .

If you have questions about this, you can call 1-866-442-4465.

TTY users can call 1-877-627-7027, or email schedule1facilities@crawco.ca .

You can also contact a lawyer at Koskie Minsky at: institutionalabuse@kmlaw.ca , or 1-888-723-4304.

You must send your claim form to the claims office by February 28, 2017.


You received this email because you are an ARCH member or you subscribed to the ARCH Alert or other electronic information from ARCH via our website, email or phone, or you signed up at a workshop or conference.

If you do not want to receive the ARCH Alert or other electronic information from ARCH, you can unsubscribe by using the link at the bottom of this page.

If you need legal advice or information, please do not reply to this email. Please contact ARCH by phone or TTY:

Tel.: 416-482-8255 Toll-free: 1-866-482-2724
TTY: 416-482-1254 Toll-free: 1-866-482-2728

If, due to your disability, you are unable to contact ARCH by phone or TTY, please email ARCH at archlib@lao.on.ca
___________________________
Theresa Sciberras
Program and Litigation Assistant
ARCH Disability Law Centre
55 University Avenue, 15th Floor
Toronto, ON, M5J 2H7
Tel. : 416-482-8255 or 1-866-482-2724 ext. 2229
TTY: 416-482-1254 or 1-866-482-2728
Fax: 416-482-2981 or 1-866-881-2723
E-mail: scibert@lao.on.ca
Website: www.archdisabilitylaw.ca

ARCH's office is physically accessible.

ARCH is a scent-free environment. We try our best to keep our office and events free of scents and fragrances. These may cause health problems for staff and visitors. We ask for your cooperation by not wearing perfumes, aftershave, lotions or any other scented products when visiting us.

The information contained in this email may be legally privileged and confidential. If you are not the intended recipient, any disclosure, copying or distribution of this material is strictly prohibited. If you have received this email in error, please immediately destroy this message and kindly notify our office. Thank you.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Self-Represented Litigants Stumble Finding Answers to Procedural Questions: But a Solution is within Reach | NSRLP

Self-Represented Litigants Stumble Finding Answers to Procedural Questions: But a Solution is within Reach | NSRLP | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
This week’s blog is written by Heather Hui-Litwin, a long-time friend of NSRLP, former SRL and co-founder of the Self-Rep Navigators group in Toronto (www.limitedscoperetainers.ca). Heather recounts her experience trying to track down procedural information for a SRL she is assisting. The 2013 Study, and our continued daily contact with SRLs at the NSRLP, demonstrates how much SRLs worry and stress about navigating court procedures, and the significance of access to accurate procedural information. Heather’s personal experiment described below shows just how hazardous and strewn with obstacles this process is. Working with the self-represented By way of background, I am a non-practising lawyer who specializes in supporting self-represented litigants through the provision of (pro bono) legal education. A recent client needed help with a family law matter. The client asked me some procedural questions, such as whether her order would remain in force when a notice of appeal was filed, and
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Disabled children and young people: extending participation

In 2008 Bradford City council became one of the pathfinder councils receiving funding from the government's transformation program, 'Aiming Higher fo
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Creep Catchers says it's caught an elementary school principal

Creep Catchers says it's caught an elementary school principal | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
Many people are identifying the video subject as the principal at Windebank Elementary School in Mission.
more...
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

Publication Bans and Interim Mandatory Injunctions in the Context of Freedom of Expression and the Privacy of Youthful Victims

Publication Bans and Interim Mandatory Injunctions in the Context of Freedom of Expression and the Privacy of Youthful Victims | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
By: Hasna Shireen PDF Version: Publication Bans and Interim Mandatory Injunctions in the Context of Freedom of Expression and the Privacy of Youthful Victims Case Commented On: R v Canadian Broadca…
more...
Velvet Martin's comment, November 24, 12:10 PM
Publication Bans and Interim Mandatory Injunctions in the Context of Freedom of Expression and the Privacy of Youthful Victims
by Hasna Shireen
By: Hasna Shireen

PDF Version: Publication Bans and Interim Mandatory Injunctions in the Context of Freedom of Expression and the Privacy of Youthful Victims

Case Commented On: R v Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2016 ABCA 326 (CanLII)

The Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta in R v Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2016 ABQB 204 (CanLII) (CBC QB) denied an interim mandatory injunction and allowed the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) to retain past posts with identifying information of a youthful victim on the CBC website. The Crown appealed the denial of the interim mandatory injunction. The Majority at the Court of Appeal held that the Chambers Judge applied the wrong legal test, that the injunction is a civil matter attached to a criminal charge, and that the Chambers Judge had considered a number of irrelevant factors. Thus, the Court of Appeal overturned the prior decision and granted an interim mandatory injunction. In my previous blog post, I criticized the Court of Queen’s Bench decision because that decision gave priority to freedom of expression of the media over a young victim’s privacy rights. One of the major purposes of a publication ban is to protect a child victim’s privacy and thereby ensure future victims will come forward with the assurance of anonymity. In R v Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2016 ABCA 326 (CanLII) the Court granted the interim mandatory injunction and maintained the integrity of the administration of justice by protecting the identity of the youthful victim in public interest. Read more of this post

Hasna Shireen | November 24, 2016 at 10:00 am | URL: http://ablawg.ca/?p=7815
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

-Serenity’s mother is still grieving, still angry her efforts at the time to get her children out of kinship care failed. “I’m not a horrible person nor a bad mother,” she says. “I’ve always trie...

-Serenity’s mother is still grieving, still angry her efforts at the time to get her children out of kinship care failed.   “I’m not a horrible person nor a bad mother,” she says. “I’ve always trie... | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
Of course when you start you don't know where you will end up. A story is like a bowl of spaghetti noodles. Some of the noodles are lon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Velvet Martin
Scoop.it!

First Nations housing should be 'front and centre' of national housing strategy, chief says

First Nations housing should be 'front and centre' of national housing strategy, chief says | Family-Centred Care Practice | Scoop.it
Shane Gottfriedson, B.C Regional Chief with the Assembly of First Nations, says First Nations housing should be a priority in Canada's proposed national housing strategy.
more...
No comment yet.