familial adenoma polyposis
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NHS cash to turn libraries and pubs into digital health hubs - Public Service

NHS cash to turn libraries and pubs into digital health hubs - Public Service | familial adenoma polyposis | Scoop.it
The NHS Commissioning Board has announced plans to get 100,000 more people using the internet to improve their own health
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MPs want to hold parliamentary debate on ‘digital by default’ agenda | Digital By Default News

MPs want to hold parliamentary debate on ‘digital by default’ agenda | Digital By Default News | familial adenoma polyposis | Scoop.it

An Early Day Motion has been tabled by Labour’s Glasgow North West MP John Robertson which criticises the government’s digital by default agenda – which wants all public services to be made available online and doing away with face-to-face meetings and phone calls in hopes of saving billions of pounds – in light of the revelation that 7 million UK citizens have never used the internet.

 

According to the motion: “the Department for Culture, Media and Sport has made no assessment of the free community internet access points in the UK” and urges the government “to initiate a strategy for increasing internet take-up and internet provision amongst vulnerable groups, such as elderly people, those on low incomes and disabled people.”


The motion has been signed by 44 politicos from all sides of the House and want to have a parliamentary debate oon the matter.

Earlier this week, when Civil Society Minister Nick Hurd was pressed by MPs to justify the government’s digital agenda, he said that “by introducing new digital services and redesigning old ones, we expect to save the taxpayer and service users around £1.2bn by 2015,” adding that “it is also about the opportunity to change totally the way the public engage with the government and radically improve that experience.”

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PRIMARY CHEMOPREVENTION OF FAMILIAL ADENOMATOUS POLYPOSIS WITH SULINDAC

PRIMARY CHEMOPREVENTION OF FAMILIAL ADENOMATOUS POLYPOSIS WITH SULINDAC | familial adenoma polyposis | Scoop.it
Background

Familial adenomatous polyposis is caused by a germ-line mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene and is characterized by the development of hundreds of colorectal adenomas and, eventually, colorectal cancer. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs can cause regression of adenomas, but whether they can prevent adenomas is unknown.

Methods

We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 41 young subjects (age range, 8 to 25 years) who were genotypically affected with familial adenomatous polyposis but phenotypically unaffected. The subjects received either 75 or 150 mg of sulindac orally twice a day or identical-appearing placebo tablets for 48 months. The number and size of new adenomas and side effects of therapy were evaluated every four months for four years, and the levels of five major prostaglandins were serially measured in biopsy specimens of normal-appearing colorectal mucosa.

Results

After four years of treatment, the average rate of compliance exceeded 76 percent in the sulindac group, and mucosal prostaglandin levels were lower in this group than in the placebo group. During the course of the study, adenomas developed in 9 of 21 subjects (43 percent) in the sulindac group and 11 of 20 subjects in the placebo group (55 percent) (P=0.54). There were no significant differences in the mean number (P=0.69) or size (P=0.17) of polyps between the groups. Sulindac did not slow the development of adenomas, according to an evaluation involving linear longitudinal methods.

Conclusions

Standard doses of sulindac did not prevent the development of adenomas in subjects with familial adenomatous polyposis.

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Prevention of Colon Cancer by Low Doses of Celecoxib, a Cyclooxygenase Inhibitor, Administered in Diet Rich in ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

Epidemiologic and animal studies suggest that a high-fat diet containing mixed lipids promotes colorectal cancer, whereas fish oil lacks promoting effect. Although cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are effective chemopreventive agents against colon carcinogenesis, administration of high doses of these agents over time may induce side effects. Here, we compared the efficacy of moderately high and low doses of celecoxib administered in diets high in mixed lipids (HFML) or fish oil (HFFO) against azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in male F344 rats. One day after the last azoxymethane treatment (15 mg/kg body weight once weekly for 2 weeks), groups of rats were fed the HFML and HFFO diets containing 0, 250, 500, and 1,000 ppm celecoxib. Rats were killed 26 weeks later and colon tumors were subjected to histopathologic examination and analyzed for total COX and COX-2 synthetic activities and COX-2 expression. Rats fed the HFFO diet showed significantly lower colon tumor incidence and multiplicity compared with rats fed the HFML diet. Celecoxib at 250, 500, and 1,000 ppm in either diet significantly suppressed colon carcinogenesis. Inhibition of colon adenocarcinomas were more pronounced in animals given 250 ppm celecoxib in HFFO diet compared with 250 ppm celecoxib given in HFML diet, suggesting some synergism between ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and celecoxib. Inhibition of colon tumors by celecoxib was associated with lower levels of COX-2 activity and expression in colon tumors. These studies support the use of low doses of celecoxib in ω-3 PUFA–rich diet as a promising approach for clinical trials.

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Gene modulation by Cox-1 and Cox-2 specific inhibitors in human colorectal carcinoma cancer cells

Cox-1 and Cox-2 specific inhibitors exert chemo-preventative activity. However, the exact mechanisms for this activity remain unclear. Increasing evidence suggests that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs regulate gene expression, which may be responsible, in part, for this activity. In this study, human colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells were treated with the Cox-1 specific inhibitor SC-560 and the Cox-2 specific inhibitor SC-58125 to evaluate their ability to induce apoptosis, inhibit cell proliferation, inhibit growth on soft agar and modulate gene expression. The Cox-1 specific inhibitor, SC-560 significantly induced apoptosis and inhibited the growth of HCT-116 cells on soft agar, an in vitro assay for tumorigenicity. SC-58125 moderately induced apoptosis and inhibited growth on soft agar at higher concentrations than were required for SC-560. Previously, we reported that the potent chemo-preventative drug sulindac sulfide altered the expression of eight genes including several transcription factors that may be linked to this drug's chemo-preventative activity. HCT-116 cells were treated with various concentrations of SC-560 or SC-58125 and changes in the expression of these eight genes were determined by real-time reverse transcription– polymerase chain reaction. SC-560 modulated mRNA expression of the eight genes studied. In contrast, SC-58125 required ∼5–10-fold higher concentrations to achieve similar degrees of gene modulation in six of eight genes. Changes in protein expression by SC-560 also occurred for five of these genes with antibodies available (NAG-1, ATF3, C/EBPβ, MAD2 and MSX1). In conclusion, this is the first report to suggest that like sulindac sulfide, the Cox-1 specific inhibitor SC-560 appears to elicit chemo-preventative activity by altering gene expression, while the chemo-preventative effects of SC-58125 are complex and probably work through these and other mechanisms, such as the inhibition of Cox-2.

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Use of NSAIDs for the Chemoprevention of Colorectal Cancer

objective: To discuss the role of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

data sources: A MEDLINE search (1966–May 2003) was performed to identify key literature. Search items included, but were not limited to, NSAIDs, colorectal cancer, chemoprevention, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)–specific inhibitors, and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP).

study selection and data extraction: The search included experimental (in vitro and animal models) and clinical studies evaluating the use of NSAIDs for the chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. The MEDLINE search was supplemented by references from selected articles.

data synthesis: Numerous experimental, epidemiologic, and clinical studies suggest that NSAIDs have promise as anticancer agents. The mechanism by which NSAIDs lead to decreased colon carcinogenesis is not fully understood, but may involve restoration of apoptosis and inhibition of prostaglandin-mediated angiogenesis. Compelling evidence from many observational studies has consistently documented a 40–50% reduction in the risk of adenomatous polyps, colorectal cancer incidence, and mortality in patients using NSAIDs. Recent randomized, controlled trials have demonstrated a benefit with aspirin in reducing the rate of development of new or recurrent adenomas in high-risk patients. In addition, randomized studies using sulindac and celecoxib in patients with FAP have documented significant regression of existing adenomatous polyps.

conclusions: Inhibition of COX-2 is an example of a targeted approach to the chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. However, controversy exists about the safety, efficacy, and optimal treatment regimen of NSAIDs as long-term chemopreventive agents in the general population. Ongoing studies in high-risk patients with both selective and nonselective COX inhibitors will provide important information in the area of colorectal chemoprevention, but clinical trials' use of adenomas as surrogate markers for chemoprevention trials makes their application to the general population limited.

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Molecular Analysis of Sulindac-resistant Adenomas in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Purpose: Sulindac causes the reduction of adenomas in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients, but complete regression is unusual, and breakthrough of colorectal carcinoma during sulindac treatment has been described. The molecular features related to sulindac resistance are unknown. Therefore, we investigated molecular alterations in adenomas from FAP patients with complete adenoma regression on sulindac (responsive patients) and from FAP patients with sulindac-resistant adenomas (resistant patients).

Design: Fourteen baseline adenomas (removed before sulindac treatment) from six responsive patients were studied. Also, 9 baseline adenomas and 34 resistant adenomas (removed during sulindac treatment) from three resistant patients were analyzed. Using immunohistochemistry, we evaluated the expression of β-catenin, cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), p53, Bcl-2, and Bax. K-ras codon 12 mutations, loss of heterozygosity at 5q (APC locus), and microsatellite instability were studied with PCR-based techniques.

Results: There were no significant differences between baseline adenomas from sulindac-responsive and -resistant patients (P > 0.05). There was less loss of membranous β-catenin staining and less nuclear β-catenin accumulation in resistant adenomas compared with baseline adenomas from the same (sulindac-resistant) patients (P < 0.01) or baseline adenomas from responsive patients (P < 0.01). Epithelial Cox-2 expression was less, though not significant, in resistant adenomas compared with baseline adenomas from resistant patients, but was significantly less in baseline adenomas from responsive patients (P < 0.01). K-ras mutations were found in 8 of 34 resistant adenomas (24%) and in none of the baseline adenomas (P < 0.05). Stromal Cox-2 expression, staining of p53 and Bcl-2, and loss of heterozygosity at 5q were comparable in both groups. Loss of Bax staining and microsatellite instability were not found in any adenoma.

Conclusions: Sulindac-resistant adenomas display less alteration in β-catenin staining and less epithelial Cox-2 expression when compared with adenomas removed before sulindac treatment. K-ras mutations may contribute to sulindac-resistance. Continued research is needed to investigate molecular alterations related to sulindac resistance.

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Effects of Dietary Folate on Intestinal Tumorigenesis in the ApcMin Mouse

Dietary folate appears to be inversely related to colorectal cancer risk. This study investigated the effects of dietary intervention with folate on the development of intestinal polyps in Min (Apc+/−) mice. Weanling Min mice were fed diets containing 0, 2 (basal requirement), 8, or 20 mg folate/kg diet. At 3 and 6 months of dietary intervention, 50% of the mice from each group were sacrificed, and the small intestine and colon were analyzed for polyps and aberrant crypt foci (ACF). Serum folate concentrations accurately reflected dietary folate levels (P < 0.001). At 3 months, no significant difference in the average number of total small intestinal polyps was observed among the four groups. However, increasing dietary folate levels significantly reduced the number of ileal, but not duodenal or jejunal, polyps in a dose-dependent manner (P-trend = 0.001); folate supplementation at 20 mg/kg diet was associated with a 68–78% reduction in the number of ileal polyps compared with the other three diets (P < 0.007). The number of ileal polyps was inversely correlated with serum folate concentrations (P = 0.03). At 3 months, increasing dietary folate levels significantly decreased the number of colonic ACF in a dose-dependent manner (P = 0.05); the control and two folate supplemented diets significantly reduced the number of colonic ACF by 75–100% compared with the folate-deficient diet (P < 0.04). The number of colonic ACF was inversely correlated with serum folate concentrations (P = 0.05). No significant difference in the number of colonic adenomas was observed among the four groups at 3 months. At 6 months, no significant differences in the average number of total small intestinal, duodenal, and jejunal polyps, colonic adenomas, and colonic ACF were observed among the four groups. However, the folate-deficient diet had a 62–76% lower number of ileal polyps compared with the control and two folate-supplemented diets (P < 0.003). Serum folate concentrations, but not dietary folate levels, were directly correlated with the number of ileal polyps (P = 0.006). These data suggest that dietary folate supplementation suppresses the development of ileal polyps and colonic ACF in this model. However, at later time points, folate supplementation appears to have an opposite effect on ileal polyps. These data generally support the role of folate in intestinal tumorigenesis suggested in epidemiological studies and chemical carcinogen animal models. Notwithstanding the limitations associated with this model, these data suggest that the optimal timing and dose of folate intervention need to be determined for safe and effective folate chemoprevention.

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Aspirin and Familial Adenomatous Polyposis: Coming Full Circle

This perspective discusses the clinical trial reported by Burn and colleagues in this issue of the journal (beginning on page 655), which assessed aspirin and resistant starch for the prevention of colorectal adenomas in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). The findings are examined in the context of previous clinical trials of aspirin in patients with sporadic adenomas and of sulindac or celecoxib in patients with FAP. This newly reported work raises important considerations of a role for aspirin in the clinical management of FAP patients and adds to considerations of a role for aspirin in the chemoprevention of colorectal cancer among broader populations. Cancer Prev Res; 4(5); 623–7. ©2011 AACR.

Perspective on Burn et al., p. 655

Received March 25, 2011.Revision received March 20, 2011.Accepted March 23, 2011.
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Govt to roll out tablet computers for children with mental health problems | Digital By Default News

Govt to roll out tablet computers for children with mental health problems | Digital By Default News | familial adenoma polyposis | Scoop.it

The government will be investing around GBP 2 million to roll out tablet computers across 42 sites in England which will be used by children with mental health problems to track their progress during therapy sessions, following research that this can improve recovery rates.

 

According to support minister Norman Lamb: “This technology helps children and young people see how their treatment is progressing.  Where treatment is not going as well as it could, practitioners can then change their approach to get the best results.”


The devices will have the added advantage of being used by therapists to record sessions so that supervisors can view them later and offer feedback as well as cutting down time spent on administration and recording outcomes.


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Treatment of Colonic and Rectal Adenomas with Sulindac in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis — NEJM

Treatment of Colonic and Rectal Adenomas with Sulindac in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis — NEJM | familial adenoma polyposis | Scoop.it

Familial adenomatous polyposis is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the formation of hundreds of colorectal adenomas and eventual colorectal cancer. Administration of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug sulindac has been followed by regression of polyps in patients with this disorder, but no controlled trial of this drug in patients who have not had surgery has been reported.

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The rice bran constituent tricin potently inhibits cyclooxygenase enzymes and interferes with intestinal carcinogenesis in ApcMin mice

While brown rice is a staple dietary constituent in Asia, rice consumed in the Western world is generally white, obtained from brown rice by removal of the bran. Rice bran contains the flavone tricin, which has been shown to inhibit colon cancer cell growth. We tested the hypothesis that tricin interferes with adenoma formation in the ApcMin mouse. Mice received tricin (0.2%) in their American Institute of Nutrition 93G diet throughout their postweaning life span (4–18 weeks). Consumption of tricin reduced numbers of intestinal adenomas by 33% (P < 0.05) compared with mice on control diet. We explored whether tricin may exert its effect via inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Its effect on COX activity was assessed in purified enzyme preparations in vitro and its ability to reduce prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in human colon–derived human colon epithelial cell (HCEC) and HCA-7 cells in vitro and in ApcMin mice in vivo. Tricin inhibited activity of purified COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme preparations with IC50 values of ∼1 μmol/L. At 5 μmol/L, it reduced PGE2 production in HCEC or HCA-7 cells by 36% (P < 0.01) and 35% (P < 0.05), respectively. COX-2 expression was reduced by tricin weakly in HCEC and unaffected in HCA-7 cells. PGE2 levels in the small intestinal mucosa and blood of ApcMin mice that had received tricin were reduced by 34% (P < 0.01) and 40% (P < 0.05), respectively, compared with control mice. The results suggest that tricin should be further evaluated as a putative colorectal cancer chemopreventive agent.

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Prostaglandin EP receptors: Targets for treatment and prevention of colorectal cancer?

The importance of the prostaglandin (PG) synthesis pathway, particularly the rate-limiting enzymatic step catalyzed by cyclooxygenase, to colorectal carcinogenesis and development of novel anticolorectal cancer therapy is well established. The predominant PG species in benign and malignant colorectal tumors is PGE2. PGE2 acts via four EP receptors termed EP1 to EP4. Recently, EP receptors have been identified as potential targets for treatment and/or prevention of colorectal cancer. This review summarizes existing knowledge of the expression and function of the EP receptor subtypes in human and rodent intestine during tumorigenic progression and describes the current literature on targeting EP receptor signaling during intestinal tumorigenesis.

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Cyclooxygenase-independent Induction of Apoptosis by Sulindac Sulfone Is Mediated by Polyamines in Colon Cancer

Cyclooxygenase-independent Induction of Apoptosis by Sulindac Sulfone Is Mediated by Polyamines in Colon Cancer | familial adenoma polyposis | Scoop.it

Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory prodrug, is metabolized into pharmacologically active sulfide and sulfone derivatives. Sulindac sulfide, but not sulindac sulfone, inhibits cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme activities, yet both derivatives have growth inhibitory effects on colon cancer cells. Microarray analysis was used to detect COX-independent effects of sulindac on gene expression in human colorectal cells. Spermidine/sperm-ine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) gene, which encodes a polyamine catabolic enzyme, was induced by clinically relevant sulindac sulfone concentrations. Northern blots confirmed increased SSAT RNA levels in these colon cancer cells. Deletion analysis and mutational studies were done to map the sulindac sulfone-dependent response sequences in the SSAT 5′-flanking sequences. This led us to the identification of two peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) response elements (PPREs) in the SSAT gene. PPRE-2, at +48 bases relative to the transcription start site, is required for the induction of SSAT by sulindac sulfone and is specifically bound by PPARγ in the Caco-2 cells as shown by transfection and gel shift experiments. PPRE-1, at–323 bases relative to the start site, is not required for the induction of SSAT by sulindac sulfone but can be bound by both PPARδ and PPARγ. Sulindac sulfone reduced cellular polyamine contents in the absence but not in the presence of verapamil, an inhibitor of the export of monoacetyl diamines, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. The induced apoptosis could be partially rescued by exogenous putrescine. These data suggest that apoptosis induced by sulindac sulfone is mediated, in part, by the COX-independent, PPAR-dependent transcriptional activation of SSAT, leading to reduced tissue polyamine contents in human colon cancer cells.

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Inhibition of COX-2 in Colon Cancer Cell Lines by Celecoxib Increases the Nuclear Localization of Active p53

Inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene usually involves somatic mutation or binding of viral oncoproteins to the p53 protein. However, several types of malignant and premalignant tissues harbor a genetically wild-type, but transcriptionally inactive, form of p53, often localized in the cytoplasm. Electrophilic prostaglandins (PGs) are known to sequester and inactivate p53 in the cytoplasm, an effect that is likely to occur when cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 levels become elevated during colon carcinogenesis. We determined the localization and expression of p53 in the presence of PGA1 and celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor in human colon cell lines HCT-116 (wild-type p53) and HT-29 (mutant p53). In the absence of treatment, p53 protein accumulated preferentially in the nucleus in both cell lines. We observed that the total cellular levels of p53 protein increased with exposure time and concentration of PGA1. By contrast, p21 protein levels remained unchanged as a function of time and concentration of PGA1. In the presence of 20 μm PGA1, p53 accumulated preferentially in the cytosol. The nuclear:cytosol ratios of p53 were 31 and 2.1 in the controls and in the presence of PGA1 in HCT-116 cells but were 22 and 4, respectively, in HT-29 cells. Treatment with 50 μm celecoxib for 24 h did not significantly change p53 expression and localization. However, in the presence of 100 μm celecoxib, p53 levels increased in the nucleus. The nuclear:cytosol ratios were then 31 (control) and 60 (100 μm celecoxib) in HCT-116 cells and 22 (control) and 36 (100 μm celecoxib) in HT-29 cells. These results indicate that electrophilic PGs cause wild-type p53 accumulation in the cytosol where it is inactive. Inhibition of COX-2 by celecoxib appears to alleviate this effect on p53 by reducing electrophilic PG synthesis. Thus, COX-2 inhibition of electrophilic PG formation appears to protect p53 tumor suppressor function.

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Highly Unsaturated (n-3) Fatty Acids, but Not α-Linolenic, Conjugated Linoleic or γ-Linolenic Acids, Reduce Tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ Mice

We showed previously that dietary eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA, 20:5(n-3)] is antitumorigenic in the ApcMin/+ mouse, a genetic model of intestinal tumorigenesis. Only a few studies have evaluated the effects of dietary fatty acids, including EPA and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA, 22:6(n-3)], in this animal model and none have evaluated the previously touted antitumorigenicity of α-linolenic acid [ALA, 18:3(n-3)], conjugated linoleic acid [CLA, 77% 18:2(n-7)], or γ-linolenic acid [GLA, 18:3(n-6)]. Stearidonic acid [SDA, 18:4(n-3)], the Δ6-desaturase product of ALA, which is readily metabolized to EPA, has not been evaluated previously for antitumorigenic efficacy. This study was undertaken to evaluate the antitumorigenicity of these dietary fatty acids (ALA, SDA, EPA, DHA, CLA and GLA) compared with oleic acid [OA, 18:1(n-9)] at a level of 3 g/100 g in the diets of ApcMin/+ mice and to determine whether any alterations in tumorigenesis correspond to alterations in prostaglandin biosynthesis. Tumor multiplicity was significantly lower by ∼50% in mice fed SDA or EPA compared with controls, whereas less pronounced effects were observed in mice fed DHA (P = 0.15). ALA, CLA and GLA were ineffective at the dose tested. Although lower tumor numbers coincided with significantly lower prostaglandin levels in SDA- and EPA-fed mice, ALA and DHA supplementation resulted in equally low prostaglandin levels, despite proving less efficacious with regard to tumor number. Prostaglandin levels did not differ significantly in the CLA and GLA groups compared with controls. These results suggest that SDA and EPA attenuate tumorigenesis in this model and that this effect may be related in part to alterations in prostaglandin biosynthesis.

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A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Prevention Trial of Aspirin and/or Resistant Starch in Young People with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Evidence supporting aspirin and resistant starch (RS) for colorectal cancer prevention comes from epidemiologic and laboratory studies (aspirin and RS) and randomized controlled clinical trials (aspirin). Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) strikes young people and, untreated, confers virtually a 100% risk of colorectal cancer and early death. We conducted an international, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of aspirin (600 mg/d) and/or RS (30 g/d) for from 1 to 12 years to prevent disease progression in FAP patients from 10 to 21 years of age. In a 2 × 2 factorial design, patients were randomly assigned to the following four study arms: aspirin plus RS placebo; RS plus aspirin placebo; aspirin plus RS; RS placebo plus aspirin placebo; they were followed with standard annual clinical examinations including endoscopy. The primary endpoint was polyp number in the rectum and sigmoid colon (at the end of intervention), and the major secondary endpoint was size of the largest polyp. A total of 206 randomized FAP patients commenced intervention, of whom 133 had at least one follow-up endoscopy and were therefore included in the primary analysis. Neither intervention significantly reduced polyp count in the rectum and sigmoid colon: aspirin relative risk = 0.77 (95% CI, 0.54–1.10; versus nonaspirin arms); RS relative risk = 1.05 (95% CI, 0.73–1.49; versus non-RS arms). There was a trend toward a smaller size of largest polyp in patients treated with aspirin versus nonaspirin—mean 3.8 mm versus 5.5 mm for patients treated 1 or more years (adjusted P = 0.09) and mean 3.0 mm versus 6.0 mm for patients treated more than 1 year (P = 0.02); there were similar weaker trends with RS versus non-RS. Exploratory translational endpoints included crypt length (which was significantly shorter in normal-appearing mucosa in the RS group over time) and laboratory measures of proliferation (including Ki67). This clinical trial is the largest ever conducted in the setting of FAP and found a trend of reduced polyp load (number and size) with 600 mg of aspirin daily. RS had no clinical effect on adenomas. Cancer Prev Res; 4(5); 655–65. ©2011 AACR.

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Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Familial Adenomatous Polyposis | familial adenoma polyposis | Scoop.it
Familial Adenomatous Polyposis. Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is the most common adenomatous polyposis syndrome.
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