Failure of Digital Rights Management
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Google engineer: DRM has nothing to do with piracy | ZDNet

Google engineer: DRM has nothing to do with piracy | ZDNet | Failure of Digital Rights Management | Scoop.it
A Google engineer claims that DRM is not about thwarting piracy, but giving content providers control over software and hardware providers.
Alex Stevens's insight:

this article is an interview with an engineer at google who argues that DRM is mainly used to increase revenue from other sources outside of the porduct itself (i.e encryption on msuic from itunes so they can only be used on iPods). the points made by Hickson are very valid and open up a whole new aspect to the controversy behind this technology

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Valve's Gabe Newell Says Piracy Is a Service Problem

Valve's Gabe Newell Says Piracy Is a Service Problem | Failure of Digital Rights Management | Scoop.it
In a wide-ranging interview, Gabe Newell dishes about Steam, piracy and Half-Life 3.
Alex Stevens's insight:

Valve CEO and all around good guy Gabe Newell shares his opinion on piracy and how it should be solved, within he makes a great argument stating that "piracy is not a pricing issue but a service issue" saying that if the retailer offers abetter service then the irates, they will make sales. the article has a nice range of examples of this theory working and ways to implement it.

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SimCity Always-Online DRM Lets Hackers Play Godzilla With Anyone's Cities | Techdirt

SimCity Always-Online DRM Lets Hackers Play Godzilla With Anyone's Cities | Techdirt | Failure of Digital Rights Management | Scoop.it
It seems that everyone is giving EA and Maxis quite a bit of grief over the SimCity debacle. The game's launch was, um, not great. The backlash against the game's producers was worse, all the more so once the lying began.
Alex Stevens's insight:

After the disaterous release of Simcity, the long awaited sequal to Maxis's hit series simcity (last entry in 2004), users were finding more and more fatal flaws, one of which being the fact that due to all players cities being saved to a server due to the always online DRM, it was found that with a simple tweak, you could load into these cities and destroy them, erasing weeks of work in a matter of seconds. the article also states EA's reaction to the outcry on the forums, which is, the threads were being deleted as to try and hide the issue from the public. the source includes a video tutorial of the exploit in action and what you can do with the tweak. 

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Rumor: More Evidence Suggests Always-Online For Next Xbox

Rumor: More Evidence Suggests Always-Online For Next Xbox | Failure of Digital Rights Management | Scoop.it
The "Durango" (codename for the next Xbox) development kit claims that Microsoft's next console will be always-online, require the use of Kinect, and must have every game installed to its hard drive.
Alex Stevens's insight:

The project durango is rumoured to have DRM to make it always online, so those users of the new Xbox that don't have a constant internet conection, won't be able to use their new peice of hardware. The rumer comes from VG leaks, a source that is known for it's legitimacy and therefore makes the site beleiveable and the rumor highly plausable.

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DRM

DRM | Failure of Digital Rights Management | Scoop.it
Digital Rights Management (DRM) technologies attempt to control what you can and can't do with the media and hardware you've purchased.


Bought an ebook from Amazon but can't read it on your ebook reader of choice?
Alex Stevens's insight:

Respected non profit organisation Electronic Frontier Foundation talks about the issue regarding DRM and it's use in multimedia (not just video games). It also discusses the locked nature of the iPhone amongst some other smartphones and how it is crippling them as a service. the source does a great job at outlining the issues created by Digtial Rights Management and organises it into a very easy to read layout.

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SecuROM (Concept)

SecuROM (Concept) | Failure of Digital Rights Management | Scoop.it
SecuROM is a controversial form of DRM, most famously used on EA's strategy game Spore.
Alex Stevens's insight:

This source gives great examples of Digtal Rights Management going completely wrong and turning the product against the user. SecuROM is essentially a root kit that makes your computer a living hell to work with, it is irddled with bugs and other issues that have according to the article caused class action lawsuits against publishers and also points out how piracy is a service issue and not a money issue. the source contains great examples and an extensive list of games effected by this.

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Ubisoft Scrapping Always-On DRM For PC Games | Rock, Paper, Shotgun

Ubisoft Scrapping Always-On DRM For PC Games | Rock, Paper, Shotgun | Failure of Digital Rights Management | Scoop.it
In an interview on RPS today, Ubisoft tells us that they will no longer use their controversial always-on DRM. In fact, they quietly scrapped it months
Alex Stevens's insight:

This source is an article form renouned video agem news site, rock paper shotgun, and is an interview with Unisoft director of online about their use of always online DRM and their response to the feedback given on it. She explains their new system for implementing DRM that isn't intrusive. It is a little disappointing the article didn't have any personal opinions on the issue from the actual director, to know if even those int he company hated it, or if it was purely the consumer.

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EA is putting microtransactions into ALL of its games

EA is putting microtransactions into ALL of its games | Failure of Digital Rights Management | Scoop.it
The reason, obviously, is that consumers "are enjoying and embracing that way of the business"

Via Jose Maria Hernandez Montes
Alex Stevens's insight:

This particular story is how gaming industry jugernaut Electronic Arts plans on adding microtransations into every single one of it's games, to not only make an extra buck, but too also add 'insentive' for people to buy the game, but at the same time drives them away fromt he sale. the source is well written and highly insightful into the chosen topic

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Jose Maria Hernandez Montes's curator insight, March 9, 2013 9:23 AM

Consumer demand has led to EA’s decision to put microtransactions into ALL of its games, the publisher says.

Furthermore, the publisher has decided to bring its microtransactions in house, having previously outsourced the work to third parties.

"We're building into all of our games the ability to pay for things along the way," EA CFO Blake Jorgensen told an audience at the Morgan Stanley Technology Media & Telecom Conference.

"Consumers are enjoying and embracing that way of the business. We've got to have a very strong back-end to make sure that we can operate a business like that.

"If you're doing microtransactions and you're processing credit cards for every one of those microtransactions, you'll get eaten alive. The team has built an amazing back-end to be able to manage that and manage it much more profitably."

The comments may on the one hand appear quite absurd. The emphasis on microtransactions in titles such as Dead Space 3 and FIFA 13 has irked the online gaming community and is viewed as little more than a way for publishers to increase the price tag of most new releases beyond the already steep upfront costs.

On the other hand, EA would only take this decision if it was seeing good returns. Another case of online outcries not mirroring real-world gaming habits?