Failure and Learning
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Failure and Learning
All about reflection, improvement, leadership, failing
Curated by Beth Kanter
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Inciting Innovation as an Organizational Imperative

Inciting Innovation as an Organizational Imperative | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

The Tiple C's 


Culture, Collaboration, and Curiosity

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How Do You Create A Culture Of Innovation?

How Do You Create A Culture Of Innovation? | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it
This is the third part in a series by Scott Anthony, author of The Little Black Book Of Innovation.It sounds so seductive: a “culture of innovation.” The three words immediately conjure up images of innovation savants like ...


Here's what caught my attention:


At the core is what the professors call “associational thinking.”


**The ability to make connections between seemingly unconnected things.


A classic example of this is how a calligraphy class inspired Apple legend Steve Jobs’s emphasis on typography on early computers.


**The professors then detail what they call the "Innovator’s DNA,"


Four time-tested approaches successful innovators follow to gather stimuli that spur these connections:


**Questioning: Asking probing questions that impose or remove constraints. Example: What if we were legally prohibited from selling to our current customer?


**Networking: Interacting with people from different backgrounds who provide access to new ways of thinking.


**Observing: Watching the world around them for surprising stimuli.


**Experimenting: Consciously complicating their lives by trying new things or going to new places.


Selected by Jan Gordon covering, "Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions"


See full article here: [http://bit.ly/MKrMLT]


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, janlgordon
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The Top 5 Reasons Your Decisions Fail You - Forbes

The Top 5 Reasons Your Decisions Fail You - Forbes | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

Offers five traits of bad decisions and how to avoid replicating them. 


Reason #4 is probably most common in nonprofit sector ....



4) Haven’t been properly vetted – they don’t factor in well enough the potential impact and outcomes


One necessary ingredient to great decisions is that you’ve gathered all the necessary information from the most diverse and inclusive perspectives possible, and evaluated each alternative scenario before you choose one option. Many terrible decisions come from an incomplete decision-making process that failed to involve the necessary brainstorming phase or a thorough enough evaluation of all the potential consequences of each alternative.



Lesson: Develop sufficient boundaries so that you’re not being overly reactive, emotional or analytical in your decision making. Use an integrative style that incorporates as much feedback and data possible, and allows you to brainstorm all possible solutions, and vet them in an effective, integrative way.

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Board Challenge: Creating a Culture That Values Both Peformance and Learning from Failure

Board Challenge:  Creating a Culture That Values Both Peformance and Learning from Failure | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org



The first is creating a culture that values both performance assessment and learning from failure. Few board members are willing to challenge their CEO and senior management on whether the organization is achieving its mission, or how it might better do so. But if we’re ever going to solve the most difficult problems facing our society, we need nonprofit boards to be relentless in pushing their organizations to measure their progress, to be honest about failures, and to learn from them.

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A different take on Failure

A different take on Failure | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org


There's a lot of writing about failure, different sectors, and different methods for failing and learning.   This article is for those who have been successful, so successful that no one questions them.   That means it is time to fail.


Instead fail at something outside your business. Set a reach goal you know you can't reach. If you normally run three miles in 21 minutes, try to run five miles in 35 minutes. Play a sport and compete with people who are a lot better than you. Try to do your high school kid's homework. If you aren't willing to step outside your business, just go help an employee do her job for a few hours and try to keep up: I guarantee she'll outperform you.


Just make sure to give whatever you pick your all. Do your absolute best. Leave no room for excuses. The goal is to fail... but not for lack of trying.



And that's a good thing. Failure isn't defeating; failure is motivating. Failure doesn't just motivate me to improve a skill. Failure also provides a healthy and instant dose of perspective. Failure makes me more tolerant and patient of other people who struggle or fail.








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Twitter / askgerber: @kanter have a discussion ...

Trust Millennials. Let Go.  And if they fail, use it as a learning experience.  Advice from Scott Gerber

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David Damberger: What happens when an NGO admits failure | Video on TED.com

TED Talks International aid groups make the same mistakes over and over again. At TEDxYYC David Damberger uses his own engineering failure in India to call for the development sector to publicly admit, analyze, and learn from their missteps.
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Have experiences of failure helped to shape your calling? | What's Your Calling

Have experiences of failure helped to shape your calling? | What's Your Calling | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it
Eboo Patel shares an experience of failure from his high school days, explaining how it motivates him to promote interfaith cooperation today.
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Early failures were seeds of Instagram's success - Business - NZ Herald News

Early failures were seeds of Instagram's success - Business - NZ Herald News | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

On the road to honing the Instagram app, they left behind a series of failed projects.

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Reflections from NTC Plenary Panel on Innovation

Reflections from NTC Plenary Panel on Innovation | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

Some thoughts on the Innovation and Nonprofits Plenary panel ... including a renewed sense to curate and write about failure

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Beth Kanter's comment, December 13, 2013 8:49 AM
I was thinking about you yesterday - I'm taking a workshop with Lisa Heft on facilitating emergent experiences.
june holley's comment, December 13, 2013 8:52 AM
I'm doing a research project on network leadership - have 30 minutes to talk - need your help!!! I'll email
Beth Kanter's comment, December 13, 2013 9:03 AM
into next week, would love to catch up and hear what you're doing.
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Failure Is My Muse

Failure Is My Muse | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org  


Love this cartoon by @gapingvoid - indeed failure is not bad, it provides an opportunity for improvement 

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Are You Driving Too Much Change, Too Fast?

Are You Driving Too Much Change, Too Fast? | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it
Start paying less attention to your own innovation speed limits and more attention to your customers'.


This "too fast/too slow" leadership conundrum reeks of "Goldilocks" management — transformations and turnarounds should be neither too fast nor too slow; they must be "just right." That's a mug's game. When "reckless" moves succeed, they're retrospectively rebranded as "bold." When "timidity" triumphs, it's celebrated as "patient" and "safe." Failure simply means leadership went too fast or didn't go fast enough. That's rationalization, not insight.

The issue is less about how fast CEOs are willing to move than how quickly their most reliable customers are prepared to change. The most effective and important diagnostic I've observed for assessing organizational speed and tempo appears obvious but underappreciated: How fast are your customers willing to change? Your own rate of change is determined less by the quality or price/performance of your offerings than the measurable readiness of your customers and clients. Their internal readiness matters more than yours. Their inertia matters more than your momentum.

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Fall in Love with the Problem, Not the Solution

Fall in Love with the Problem, Not the Solution | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it
It’s human nature to love our own ideas.


fall in love with the problem, not the solution.

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Oops, My Bad! 5 Ways Your Business Can Improve by Admitting to Mistakes

Oops, My Bad! 5 Ways Your Business Can Improve by Admitting to Mistakes | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

"Aim don't blame"

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Taking the Stigma Out of Failure

Taking the Stigma Out of Failure | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

In Failure Club, members learn to defy the fears associated with ‘failure’ by pursuing seemingly impossible goals that they set for themselves. From the outset, failure is not only a highly probable outcome, it is the desired outcome. Only through embracing the reality of failure can its’ societal stigmas be stripped away and replaced with an inspirational alternative.

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Forgive yourself is you make a mistake

Forgive yourself is you make a mistake | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org


Summarizes research report about how you need to frame mistakes and failure in your own head to get past the shame:


What's the best course of action following a screwup? Forget beating yourself up, and instead be nice--to yourself.


The study's conclusion for students--"forgive yourself for you have procrastinated, move on, get over it and you'll be more likely to get going without delay next time around"--is probably equally applicable to entrepreneurs.


Article on INC: http://www.inc.com/jessica-stillman/how-to-bounce-back-from-a-mistake.html

Study Referenced:   http://www.spring.org.uk/2012/09/the-surprising-motivational-power-of-self-compassion.php

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Should you evaluate your blog the way you evaluate your employees?

Should you evaluate your blog the way you evaluate your employees? | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it
If you have a Facebook page, a Twitter account, a blog or some other social media platform, chances are you’re constantly giving it flash evaluations. “How many retweets did I get today? How many views did that post get?
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How To Reframe Failure To Reach Success

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org


This article starts off with a call for us to reframe failures and mistakes from shame to learning.   Anyone who has reached the mountaintop will admit that success comes not from your failures, but from your response to those failures.



I love this quote:  


An ancient Buddhist proverb says, “The arrow that hits the bull’s eye is the result of a hundred misses.”


The advice is to let go of your fear of failure because it actually causes more mistakes.  Once you embrace the learning that follows a mistake or something that wasn't successful, the sting of shame gives way to incredible learning which leads to success.


The article suggests some approaches for this reframing:


*  Depersonalize the failure:  You are not a "failure" - you just failed trying to do something.  


*  Create a Failing Forward Journal:     Suggests writing about your failures and doing an after action review.  Some great reflection questions:  Why were your nervous?  What did not perform at your best?   Why did you have negative thoughts? 


Closing quote:  Failure is not failure unless it is failure to change.


http://www.theleafchronicle.com/article/20120819/LIFESTYLE/308190009/Failing-forward?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|Frontpage|s



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The Failure Myth: Why Failing More Often Is Bad For You - Forbes

The Failure Myth: Why Failing More Often Is Bad For You - Forbes | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter
http://www.bethkanter.org



Author: 


Michael Tefula This is a guest post by a fellow young high-achiever, Michael Tefula. Michael is a recent graduate from the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom.



This piece caught my attention because of the headline.  I thought it might be a clearly articulated argument on the downside of "failure."  He is saying that the "failure" movement is overhyped - and that not everyone who fails goes onto great success.    I don't agree with a lot of what he saying, but wanted to better understand those who feel failiure is a good way to learn.




Let us not take failure lightly. Instead, let us succeed as fast as we can – if we’re ever truly going to make it.


Failure is an over-glorified pain to be avoided. (Especially if behavioral economics tells us people respond nearly twice as strongly to losses as they do to gains!) Sure, we can and should learn a lot from it. Failure, if taken rightly, can be used as a positive force in our lives — but we should also try to minimize its impact and learn how to avoid it in the first place, instead of just correcting our failures and learning from them once they have already happened.


As a result, here are three key pointers that have helped me brace for — and ultimately avoid failure. Perhaps they can be of use to you too.

Test the waters before taking the plunge.


Do you really have what it takes? Have independent third parties corroborated your confidence for success? Make sure you can crawl before trying to walk.


Fail quietly, privately, and in isolation.
What better way to fail and learn than in an environment where it doesn’t really matter?

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Thabo Mophiring's comment, July 13, 2012 10:38 AM
I think failure should be understood in terms of experimentation. The more experiments. the greater the likelihood of overall success, even thought many experiments fail.

The notion of safe-fail environments is key to this.
Not sure of 'Fail safely, privately and in isolation' as it reinforces failure as shame thinking.
Ideally, Plan to succeed, act to succeed, learn from failure and success.
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Reframe Your Fear Of Failure

Reframe Your Fear Of Failure | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org


Reframing failure as an expected part of the process of living life normalizes the experience and takes some of the charge out of it.


Fear of failure has one thing in common with all of our other fears: It is a feeling and not a fact.


Answer the questions below about your fear of failure to help you gain clarity.

1. How is this fear of failure holding you back?
2. What would life be like if you did not have this fear?
3. Who are you afraid of disappointing if you fail?
4. How strong is your desire to release this fear?
5. If there were one step you could take to overcome this fear, what would it be?

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Fearless from Case Foundation: Principles for Innovation

Fearless from Case Foundation:  Principles for Innovation | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

This is a new initiative - site and report from the Case Foundation that is promoting social innovation encouraging those in the sector to take risks, be bold, and fail forward. 


Read the report, take the pledge.

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We Fail (Even More) When We Fail To Talk About Failure (VIDEO)

We Fail (Even More) When We Fail To Talk About Failure (VIDEO) | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it
Ideas, Knowledge, Multimedia, Updates, Video...

Video from Grant Oliphant who lays out a 10-point approach for overcoming resistance to failure.  Terrific video.

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Epic Fail: 3 Ways to Come Back Stronger

Epic Fail: 3 Ways to Come Back Stronger | Failure and Learning | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org


Fostering an organizational culture that foster innovation means embracing risk and failure.  This article offers three ideas    


One focuses on encouraging a team or organizational culture to feel comfortable with failure:


The key is to balance performance and learning. Employees must feel like they can try new things and fail in the short term without being punished in the medium to long term. The message should be that risk and failure is acceptable - as long as the loss is monitored and there is learning. A positive side effect is that employees will feel like they have your organization's support, which will help innovation continue to prosper.





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