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11 Bad Teaching Habits That Are Stifling Your Growth

11 Bad Teaching Habits That Are Stifling Your Growth | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it

"There’s a certain class of mistakes that all educators can eliminate with conscious effort, and in this post we outline 11 of them. They range from habits of practice to habits of thought, but all of them have one important thing in common: they make your job harder."


Via Beth Dichter
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

#11 - Not getting to know your students. I think this is the most important tip -- but they're all good. 

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 13, 2014 10:26 PM

For many of us this school year has come to an end or will shortly. Perhaps it is time to reflect on our year and consider habits that might need to be changed. This post looks at 11 habits. A few are listed below.

* Not learning from colleagues. This seems simple, but given how busy our day is it is tough to find time to observe another teacher, or have someone tape you and ask others to provide you with feedback.

* Assuming a lesson taught is a lesson learned. Have you asked yourself how many times you have repeated a portion of a lesson? With the range of students in our classrooms the need to rephrase, review, reteach key points may be more necessary than we think.
* Failing to establish relevance. At times this may seem difficult to do, but for our students to learn we need to make our topic relevant to them. When you are successful with this share your ideas with others!
Click through to the post to see 8 additional habits that you may want to change.
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Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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The 20 Most Popular TED Talks in 2014 ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

The 20 Most Popular TED Talks in 2014 ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it
After releasing TED in Ideas a few days ago, TED shared today its selection of the most popular talks of 2014. Some of the talks featured here were also part of an earlier list I created yesterday entitled "Best 5 TED Talks for Educators". TED's list of this year contains 20 talks  covering a variety of topics from overcoming adversity to the latest in technology. Some of the talks I really enjoyed in this list are :

Via John Evans
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Tips for a Winning Research Proposal

Tips for a Winning Research Proposal | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it

Experts suggest ways to gain favor with funding agencies.

The numbers look scary. Of the 48,999 research proposals it received in fiscal year 2013, the National Science Foundation funded just 10,829, or 22 percent. At the National Institutes of Health, the "success rate" was less than 17 percent. For new faculty members making their first try as a principal investigator (PI), things were more intimidating. At NSF, 17 percent of these proposals got funded; at NIH, fewer than 10 percent. The rates are unlikely to improve much in the near future, with government research funding essentially flat. But strip away the one-third of proposals rejected because they don't meet basic requirements like deadlines and add to that the ones so badly composed as to insult reviewers, and the picture starts to look brighter. "If you do your job before you submit, things aren't so bleak," says Susan Kemnitzer, deputy director of NSF's Electrical Communications and Cyber Systems Division in the Engineering Directorate.

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Online Teaching Play Book

Online Teaching Play Book | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it

Shannon Mersand: "This is a resource I am building to help myself, and possibly others, as they work toward building and facilitating online courses. It was inspired by my interactions with fellow students, Deb Kabler and Dr. Kay Lehmann in Collaborative Communities in eLearning. It is very much a work in progress."


Via Dennis T OConnor
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Some useful resources here. Thanks, Shannon!

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, November 11, 2014 7:43 PM

This is a curated resource for online teachers. Articles and books covering a variety of topics:  


Course Design, Discussions, Assessment, Management, Tips for Online Students.



Claire Brooks's curator insight, November 14, 2014 6:31 PM

not a lot of new or cutting edge stuff here, but nevertheless a collection that might be useful

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Climbing the Stairs: Observations on a Teaching Career

Climbing the Stairs: Observations on a Teaching Career | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it
My office is on the first floor of the education building. I have spent 27 years in this building. Unless I have a meeting in another department, I rarely go upstairs. Recently, however, I started a daily routine of climbing the four sets of staircases in the building. Trying to slow the progression of osteoporosis in my right hip, I go up one set and down another three times as I make my way around the building. This physical activity has given me a chance to engage in some mental reflection. Here I will briefly share five observations on a career spent teaching in higher education with an eye toward encouraging newer faculty to achieve longevity in the profession.
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The Art of Saying "No"

The Art of Saying "No" | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it

One of the most frequent and difficult pieces of advice I received as a pre-tenure faculty member was "just say no." I always felt frustrated by this advice because (while well-intended and correct) it is far easier said than done, especially for under-represented faculty. This difficulty is due to the fact that being the only _____ in your department means you will receive a disproportionately high number of service requests from all across your campus in the name of "diversity." That additional service will neither be rewarded, nor serve as a substitute for published research (at a research-intensive university), nor will it offset lackluster teaching evaluations (at a teaching-intensive institution) when it comes time for your promotion and tenure decision. While "just say no" is important advice for all tenure-track faculty, it is essential for under-represented faculty who are challenged to say "no" more frequently, and to a broader range of campus leaders, in order to have the necessary time to excel in the areas that matter most to promotion: research, publication, and teaching.

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Syllabus Design for Dummies

Syllabus Design for Dummies | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it
Here’s an introductory lesson aimed at graduate students and early career professors.

 

I know plenty of teachers who dread writing their syllabi, putting them off until the last minute when, finally, the night before classes start, they quickly crank out just enough to make it look like they know what they’re doing. Don’t do that. You will be much better off if you allow some time to think about the syllabus before writing it. A syllabus should go through multiple drafts before it’s shared with students. 

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Should professors be told why they were denied tenure? @insidehighered

Should professors be told why they were denied tenure? @insidehighered | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it

Some 28 peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, $1.4 million in research funding and strong evaluations along the way – but still no tenure. The only thing more disturbing to Dylan Kesler, an assistant professor of wildlife sciences at the University of Missouri at Columbia, than his failed bid this summer is that he still hasn’t been told why. Kesler thinks he’s being retaliated against for blowing the whistle on alleged misuses of federal research funds in his department. But he says can’t confirm that or appeal the university’s decision without a formal reason for his denial.

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For Adjuncts, a Lot Is Riding on Student Evaluations

For Adjuncts, a Lot Is Riding on Student Evaluations | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it
Working off the tenure track, it’s easy to feel that you’re only a couple of dissatisfied students away from losing your job.
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

What is your experience with student evaluations of teaching? 

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Do-It-Yourself Virtual Professional Development: Taking Ownership of Your Learning

Do-It-Yourself Virtual Professional Development: Taking Ownership of Your Learning | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it
Edutopia blogger Monica Burns, advocating that teachers take ownership of their professional development, suggests seven online strategies to help, including Google Hangouts, video tutorials, and sane ways to embrace the information-rich Twitter experience.
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Six Principles for Measuring and Communicating the Value of Your Faculty Development Center

Six Principles for Measuring and Communicating the Value of Your Faculty Development Center | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it
This is an era of rapid transformation and heightened opportunities for Faculty Development Centers (FDCs). There is a growing realization that faculty development can be a crucial component in addressing some of the most significant challenges facing higher education, including technology’s impact on teaching, reliance on part-time and distance faculty, and student success.
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15 Visual Content Tools That Rock

15 Visual Content Tools That Rock | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it
Today I'm sharing just why it's dangerous to put your trust in copy on it's own and why visual content can create the perfect balance for your blog.

 

 


Via Baiba Svenca
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Some great tools listed here. It's so helpful to have ways to incorporate visual content, both in an online course and blended course.

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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, September 6, 2014 8:22 AM

A short list of tools for creating visual content.

All of them are good, but are much more than these 15.

Pam Colburn Harland's curator insight, September 7, 2014 8:39 AM

Great list of useful graphics tools!

Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 27, 2014 1:42 PM

Good selection

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From the Archives: the First Week of the Academic Term

From the Archives: the First Week of the Academic Term | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it

The ProfHacker archives are full of useful ideas, tools, and advice relevant to the first week of a new academic semester or quarter. In addition to the posts highlighted below, you may want to check out some previous From the Archives posts on New Semester, New Year, Creating Syllabi, and Grading.

Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

This post is packed with links to all sorts of useful suggestions and resources. A great "go-to" source as you prepare for a new academic year. 

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I Used to Be a Good Teacher

I Used to Be a Good Teacher | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it
I spent five years on the tenure track. Now I’m an adjunct, and I'm finding that it's a lot harder to teach well in isolation.
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Great article on the importance of support and development. 

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Learning Resources That Won’t Feel Like Work

Learning Resources That Won’t Feel Like Work | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it
Welcome to this year’s “just-in-time PD.” We are finding classroom inspiration in unlikely places. Whether you have one hour or ten, we've got resources for you.
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Some of these are for K-12, but there are still some useful resources. 

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Prezentt - Share your slides & content seamlessly

Prezentt - Share your slides & content seamlessly | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it

Prezentt is a web app that helps presenters to get a 1000% better interaction with their audience through a range of tools. Share your slides with your audience immediately, track questions and follow ups, save time and get much greater audience engagement.


Via Baiba Svenca
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Something that might be useful at a conference. 

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Roberta Bano's curator insight, November 17, 2014 6:07 AM

beautiful presentations, also interactive

Benjamin Labarthe-Piol's curator insight, November 21, 2014 10:31 AM

Useful

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Google Tips and Tricks - "I didn't know I could do that in Google!"

Google tips and tricks presentation to educators on Nov. 6, 2014 at BIT14 (ECOO) in Niagara Falls Ontario Canada.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

So many amazing ideas. I challenge you to find one you can use! 

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DailyEnglish's curator insight, November 16, 2014 4:16 AM

Nous sommes toujours en train d'ameliorer nos methodes pour apprendre l'anglais aux etudiants lors des séjours en immersion anglaise dans des familles anglophones en France .... nous ne restons pas sur nos acquises, nous cherchons proposer à vos enfants des cours tous les matins qui sont engageants, interessants , interactives et qui correspondent au Monde du 21 siecle et aux futurs besoins de vos enfants , pensez vous que  vos enfants vont apprendre l'anglais avec un bled  ? un annabac ? des worksheets ? pendant leurs vacances scolaires ? ou est ce qu'il faut chercher les methodes mieux adaptés , qui les stimulent et qui les excitent ?

Daily English, pour apprendre l'anglais dans des familles anglophones avec enfants , trouve toujours des methodes pour faire progresser vos enfants en anglais et pour reussir leur avenir

A bientot

Sally Cornan

www.dailyenglish.fr

Mardi's curator insight, December 22, 2014 10:56 AM

A list of Google features

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Making Lectures Unmissable!

Making Lectures Unmissable! | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it

Giving learners information is only part of the business of designing a lecture, so we've got to make sure that lectures are learning experiences and not just information distribution events.  In particular that first lecture in any series is a make or break occasion for many a learner. It's also make or break for us - there's no second chance to make a good first impression! In other words, we've got to try to make lectures unmissable! It's got to be worth being there. This chapter has been about making learning happen in large-group contexts - usually called lectures on timetables. We've seen that the act of lecturing is rarely the best way of making learning happen, and that we need to be thinking carefully about what learners are doing while sitting in lecture theatres or large classrooms. In this final section of the chapter, I would like to condense some of my main suggestions, linking them particularly to the context of starting off a lecture series. Every new lecturer's nightmare is getting a lecture series off to a bad start, and learner attendance falling off as the series goes on - or worse, lots of learners later failing the related exam and blame coming back to the lecturer. This isn't confined to new lecturers.  The following suggestions may help you to make your lectures unmissable. 

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Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher

Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it

There is a classic Calvin & Hobbes cartoon where Calvin says to his mother, "I read this library book you got me." His mother asks, "What did you think of it?" Calvin replies, "It really made me see things differently. It's given me a lot to think about." His mother says, "I'm glad you enjoyed it." In the last frame, walking away, Calvin remarks, "It's complicating my life. Don't get me any more." That is how I have often felt about the most paradigm-changing ideas or experiences I have gone through: now I am more aware, but with that I am self-aware of my limitations, aware of the limitations of others, aware of the complexity of the world, and it makes thinking more challenging.

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How I became an online instructor, and why you should become one too.

Many of us think about ways we can give back to our fellow man, and one of the best ways to help anyone is to share with them what you know, and what you have learned in your life. Much of this can be the formal knowledge that you have learned, but much of this knowledge will be the information you have learned from your parents, friends, spouse, kids, society, etc. Blended together, YOU, can make a real change in someone’s life, and help them see something in a different way. By teaching online courses, you can help give back to your world, and help everyone benefit from the gift of education. 

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Teaching College Students How to Write a Teaching Evaluation

Why Teaching Evaluation Matters

Student evaluations of teachers (SETS) are tricky things. Many teachers do not find them particularly useful, yet many administrators rely on them to assess teaching. For adjuncts especially, SETs can be fraught because poor evaluations, or too many negative comments in otherwise neutral or even good evaluations, can get you fired.

If you talk to students about doing SETs, many, maybe most, will say that they don't think their comments matter, and so the do them, but not with as much thought or reflection as hoped for, maybe with a touch of cynicism.

Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Some great suggestions here on how to get more meaningful evaluations from students. 

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Writer’s Block? 7 Ways To Get Past It. - Return On Now

Writer’s Block? 7 Ways To Get Past It. - Return On Now | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it
Do you suffer from writer's block when blogging? Here are some suggestions for how you can get past it. We all struggle at times, but keep the faith!
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Articulating Learning Outcomes for Faculty Development Workshops

Articulating Learning Outcomes for Faculty Development Workshops | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it
The use of student learning outcomes (SLOs) is commonplace at regionally accredited colleges and universities in the United States. I have been working with SLOs in one form or another for the past decade, even before they became fashionable. Many years ago, while I was an instructor in the US Navy, SLOs were called Terminal Objectives. After the service, I taught GED classes and at that time SLOs were referred to as Learning Goals. Regardless of the latest trendy technical name, SLOs are clear
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Good article on using learning objectives for faculty development programs. 

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Establishing a Research Agenda

Establishing a Research Agenda | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it

A crucial first step in establishing a research agenda is to define clearly your purposes for researching and for publishing that research.  These will undoubtedly change as you progress through your career or even as you move from institution to institution.  If this kind of mobility is in the cards for you, establish your agenda accordingly. 

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Five Ways to Say No

Five Ways to Say No | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it

Do you ever find yourself attending an event or participating in a project that you don’t really have time for, aren’t interested in, or won’t benefit from in some personal or professional way? It happens to all of us. It can usually be traced back to that moment when you agreed to do the project, or attend the meeting, even though you already knew you didn’t want to. Or maybe you did think you wanted to attend – it seemed like a reasonable thing to do, or you wanted to support the person or group hosting the event, oryou just said yes without really thinking too clearly about how you’d feel on a Wednesday night, late in the semester, the week after attending a conference.

Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Often, we can't get our own work done because we are so busy trying to support others. Here are some useful tips on how to get out graciously. I'm not sure I agree with the last tip, which is to suggest someone else (Yiks!), but the other four tips are good. 

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Shouldn't Education and Learning Be the Same Thing?

Shouldn't Education and Learning Be the Same Thing? | Faculty Professional Development | Scoop.it

"Schooling and institutionalized education have become removed from true, instinctual, and human/humane learning.  Humans have been learning since the beginning of time with major discoveries and innovations historically and currently emerging in spite of school.  This is the biggest problem I have with schools – most are contrived and coercive and do not honor the innate human need and desire to learn, discover, and evolve."


Via Beth Dichter
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Interesting post which discusses how to pull schools out of the 20th century. 

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 20, 2014 10:24 PM

In this post Jackie Gerstein states "to fully understand the purpose of school, the history of its evolution as an institution needs to be understood." After this is discussed she provides refers to an article that discusses "how to bring our schools out of the 20th century."

The next section shares quotes from a wide range of people on schooling. Three are below.

* Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school.  Albert Einstein

* Knowledge that is acquired under compulsion obtains no hold on the mind. Plato

* Education is one of the chief obstacles to intelligence and freedom of thought.  Bertrand Russell

She then looks at the messages sent out by our current school system and asks if we are questioning "What is the purpose of school?"

In fact, there are 8 questions that are raised in this post. You can find them in the image above, or you may click through to the post.

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, August 22, 2014 10:49 AM

Interesting post which discusses how to pull schools out of the 20th century.