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I've Been Using Evernote All Wrong. Here's Why It's Actually Amazing | Lifehacker

I've Been Using Evernote All Wrong. Here's Why It's Actually Amazing | Lifehacker | Fabulous Finds | Scoop.it

By Whitson Gordon

 

"For years, I kept hearing how awesome Evernote was: how it could store everything you possibly needed, make it available everywhere, and how scores of people couldn't live without it. I tried it multiple times, and never saw the appeal until now. Here's what I was missing.

 

"Any time we talk about Evernote, a good number of you say the same thing: you've tried it time and time again, but you could never really "get into it." I was in the same camp, but after reading the other side's experiences in this article and its comments, I decided to give it another shot. If you're like I was and haven't yet experienced the greatness of Evernote, here are some things you should try.

The More You Add, the More Useful Evernote Becomes

"Let's start with the most important trick: In order to see why everyone likes Evernote, it's important to take advantage of everything it has to offer (rather than use it as just another note taker). Reader ppdd says it best:

 

"The key to Evernote is to commit to it and jump in with both feet. It's pretty rotten if you're just using it for a few isolated tasks, because absolutely, it doesn't do any one thing perfectly and it's not as fast as other apps.

 

"It really starts to show its brilliance once you start using it as your default bookmark/webclip app, notetaker, recipe box, repository of all your reference material, and so on. It's great to have ALL the information you need indexed and searchable across every single platform you have. I love opening it up in a meeting and recording the meeting audio right along with my typed notes on my iPad. If I miss something (entirely possible while pecking things out on a glass screen) I can always return to it after the meeting."

 

Via Miguel Guhlin


Via Jim Lerman, Martha D
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, March 14, 2013 3:36 PM

I've been using Evernote for about a year.  I'm still at the point the author describes in this piece.  I use it. But I'm not addicted.  Should I go all in and really see if I get hooked?  

Joyce Valenza's curator insight, March 14, 2013 3:39 PM

add your insight...

Pauline Wilson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 12:05 AM

Making the most of Evernote

Rescooped by Cathy Scott Patterson from Elementary School Library
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30 bite-sized writing tips for better eLearning content

30Bite-Sized Writing Tips for BettereLearning Content

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Martha D
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Iraham Alvarez's comment, June 16, 2013 7:05 PM
Thanks to this kind of items we realize that the student's behavior is not correct at the time of trial or envestigacion some that the searches of the subjects are poor in content, that the student trusts and confidence paguinas of course not even read the information, good way to look at things in this article. posting good teacher :)
Julio Castillo 10's comment, June 16, 2013 8:40 PM
Este tema se trata sobre el apoyo de la gestión a la reforma escolar total y casi parecido al tema " El constructivismo en la educación".
Alejandro Macias's comment, June 16, 2013 10:06 PM
Este documento tiene algo de razón ya que en la actualidad casi nunca se investiga bien solo se hecha un vistazo y solo se basa en una sola fuente de información(lo mas fácil).
Y esto afecta en nuestro aprendizaje.
Rescooped by Cathy Scott Patterson from Elementary School Library
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Developing 21st Century Critical Thinkers - Infographic

Developing 21st Century Critical Thinkers - Infographic | Fabulous Finds | Scoop.it
Download an 11X17 version of the Developing 21st Century Critical Thinkers Infographic by Mentoring Minds.com.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Martha D
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Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA's comment, September 26, 2013 9:05 PM
Mathy: Definitely the time to make some changes...
Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA's comment, September 26, 2013 9:08 PM
Diane: I agree, the Flipped Classroom is a great strategy to engage the students!
Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA's comment, September 26, 2013 9:08 PM
Diane: I agree, the Flipped Classroom is a great strategy to engage the students!
Rescooped by Cathy Scott Patterson from Elementary School Library
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"How To Do Research" Game

"How To Do Research" Game | Fabulous Finds | Scoop.it
"How To Do Research" game is presented by Kentucky Virtual Library. It's designed for kids to learn how to do research independently with kids-friendly user experience. Did you know that you can ac...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Martha D
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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 24, 2014 12:37 PM

A Game for the children :)

Lotte Schacht's curator insight, September 14, 2014 7:09 AM

Great stuff.

larcher's curator insight, October 19, 2014 11:07 AM

ajouter votre point de vue ...

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Eight ways kindergarten holds the key to 21st-century instruction | eSchool News

Several of the revolutionary changes we've been calling for in our schools have actually been around for quite a while—just talk a stroll down to any kindergarten class.

Via Ivon Prefontaine, Martha D
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 6, 2013 1:17 PM

Everything I learned I learned in kindergarten.

Rescooped by Cathy Scott Patterson from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Storyville: What is Literary Fiction?

Storyville: What is Literary Fiction? | Fabulous Finds | Scoop.it
How do you define literary fiction?

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 6, 2013 12:55 PM

I thought I'd love this article.

 

I didn't.

 

Not that much of it is based upon some degree of truth. But rather, for many students there is a tone of "snootiness" that they find incredibly off-putting. 

 

Who likes to hear that what he or she likes, for example Harry Potter or graphic novels, isn't worthwhile reading; even when it isn't really said but rather perceived as implied at the very least?

 

Who likes to hear that that a story isn't really a good story unless it's so sophisticated that it requires even the best of readers to have to have "to look up about six words" in a single paragraph "just to understand what..." is being said?

 

And, who is to say that some plot elements and genres are less likely to raise the great questions in a more palatable form as one's appreciation of for literary fiction develops? In fact, it may be the very witches and wizards Sleeping Beauty and in Harry Potter that make way for developing an appreciation for the very same themes as the witches in Macbeth?

 

Though this article is well-intended and ironically intended to distinguish "Literary Fiction" from what I would suppose the article would call the non-literary fiction, I can't help but think that it relies upon a rather too simplistic analysis of both and thereby, presents a position that may be more detrimental to the potential for encouraging life-long reading than beneficial.

 

~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 "Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.