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Translation tool or dictionary?

Translation tool or dictionary? | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
Gareth Davies is a teacher and teacher trainer based in Czech Republic. His students are typical of many language learners, preferring to use a translation tool rather than a dictionary.
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Look, Appear, Feel + Adjective or Adverb?

Look, Appear, Feel + Adjective or Adverb? | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
She looked nervous after she looked nervously at her watch.
Most students know that the Be verb takes an adjective, not an adverb. But what about other stative, non-action verbs such as look, appear, and feel?
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Podcast: World Cup

Podcast: World Cup | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
Podcast: World Cup
(Intermediate)
The World Cup is the most highly anticipated sporting event in the world! ESL Library has an intermediate and a beginner-level lesson plan about the World Cup.
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So you think you can write?

So you think you can write? | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
Ever thought about writing your own teaching materials? Stephen Greene is an English language teacher, teacher trainer, and materials developer. Here, he takes us through the process he undertook to write his first published materials.
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efl resources

http://limfabweb.weebly.com

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“Simon’s Cat” Videos Are Perfect For English Language Learners

“Simon’s Cat” Videos Are Perfect For English Language Learners | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
As regular readers know, I’m a big fan of using short video clips with English Language Learners as a language-development activity (you can read more at The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL (& How To Use Them) ).
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Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL

Around The Web In ESL/EFL/ELL | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
I’ve started a somewhat regular feature where I share a few posts and resources from around the Web related to ESL/EFL or to language in general that have caught my attention: Here’s an interesting infographic on learning English (it may not be...
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More Good Resources On Asking Questions

More Good Resources On Asking Questions | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
Here are new additions to The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions:
I really like This Post Will Make You A More Effective Communicator In 90 Seconds by Shane Snow.
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Driver Education Infographics

Driver Education Infographics | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
Here are two additions to The Best Online Resources For Drivers Education & Car Information:
Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.
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Translation tool or dictionary?

Translation tool or dictionary? | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
Gareth Davies is a teacher and teacher trainer based in Czech Republic. His students are typical of many language learners, preferring to use a translation tool rather than a dictionary.
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Fundamentals of Google Docs Online Course

Fundamentals of Google Docs Online Course | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
ALISON Free Online Courses: Fundamentals of Google Docs

 

Google Docs is a free, Web-based office suite and data storage service offered by Google. It allows users to create and edit documents online while collaborating in real-time with other users. 


Via Dennis T OConnor
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M Dolores Solé Gómez's curator insight, September 13, 2013 1:34 AM

Getting the basics of Google docs

Steve Vaitl's curator insight, September 13, 2013 8:08 AM

Great resource to get started using the free office suite available to everyone!!

N Kaspar's curator insight, September 13, 2013 9:01 AM

Looks good at first blush.

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16 Fancy Literary Techniques Explained By Disney

16 Fancy Literary Techniques Explained By Disney | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
Because why waste money on an English degree when you can just watch Disney movies?

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 4, 2013 7:03 AM

A challenge...

 

How much more than what is so clearly discussed in this article does EVERY student need to know about literary devices before we send them out into "the real world"?

 

I am not suggesting the the essence of understanding literary devices is unimportant. But rather that the basics of literary devices are so clearly explained here, that the vast majority of students might well "get it" and "get it well enough" to begin seeing these devices at play in the increasingly challenging readings expected of them in the upper grades. 

 

I've often, and as recently as in yesterday's post, posed a concern about the degree to which literary reading instruction succeeds or fails in creating life-long readers. Or, put more bluntly, the degree to which literary reading instruction encourages or discourages the creation of life-long readers.

 

As English majors, I'm certain (?) that none of us could even imagine what is lost in reading among those who did not major in English and therefore are completely oblivious to the literary value of "Anagnorisis" in a well-crafted story.

 

"A-nag-or-is-it-what"?

 

No! "Anagnorisis," You know when a character who doesn't get it finally gets it. A character's important realization that he or she hadn't known what he or he hadn't known. You know. That sort of thing.

 

Of course, I'm cherry-picking one of the much more obtuse literary devices to make my point. Truth be told, I'm not sure that "Anagnorisis" is a term that I had ever run across before. And, yet it is the name, apparently, for a literary device that has been at the heart of discussion starters in my and probably your classrooms forever.

 

I've wondered aloud about whether our focus in literary analysis ought to be built upon a more delicate or fine-tuned balance between encouraging many more of our graduates to continue reading literature as an ongoing life practice and encouraging at least some of our graduates to have become so engaged in literary reading that they go on to major in English and even pick up the sacred torch of teaching literature.

 

Though both goals are worthy, I worry about the extent to which the latter focus might be counterproductive and dare I say fatal in the pursuit of the former focus for far too many of our students.

 

I have no doubt that the skills and appreciation for literary reading associated with literary scholarship can play a large role in achieving both goals. While at the same time, i can not help but be concerned about the point at which the extensive attention to the scholarly side of literary analysis also plays a major role in the declining interest in reading of many of our students as they transition from childhood stories to the literary challenges associated with stories taught in upper grades that have to be dissected at levels leaving too many students with a sense that the value of literary reading is trumped completely by the difficulty of seeing what it is that their teachers seem to see between, rather than in the lines "of last night's reading."

 

So even as a high school teacher, I might begin a course with this article as a discussion starter, followed by a brainstorming session regarding how many stories in print OR film OR around the Thanksgiving table when the old folks are retelling those old stories they enjoy telling and hearing no matter how many times they've sat round the Thanksgiving table boring the children to death with those old "alreday heard that one about a million times" stories.

 

I know my students, whether they were future English majors or not, could fill a few class sessions "seeing" these literary devices at play in all sorts of stories they had encountered.

 

And, by the way, as" just an aside," do you remember how much you looked forward to being promoted from the children's table at Thanksgiving to the grown ups' table? 

 

How great was that going to be?

 

hmmm... maybe ""Anagnorisis" is a more valuable literary device than I had thought it was way back when I began jotting down my thoughts on this artice.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips is an educational nonprofit

Linda Alexander's curator insight, August 4, 2013 8:01 AM

Wonderful literary examples-- and the original curators comments are also interesting to read!

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A host of heroes - April Gudenrath

A host of heroes - April Gudenrath | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
What
can some of literature’s most famous heroes teach us? From the epic
hero (like Beowulf) to the tragic hero (like Oedipus), each has something
distinctive to share.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Fabrizio Bartoli's insight:

Flipped English Literature tips...

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, May 1, 2013 5:35 AM

 

THIS IS FLIPPIN' GREAT!!!

 

Sometimes we just run across a pretty darned incredible resource for teaching literature. This short video makes the different types of heroes in literature and the roles they play so clear...and best of all, the role they play in our lives.

 

Can it get any cooler? YES! You can actually "Flip" the lessons yourself and wrap your own lessons around each video. 

 

AND, it just keeps getting cooler. You can use the ed.TED.com site to create a lesson for any video on YouTube! Host that lesson on ed.TED.com 

 

You can assign the lesson and even track your students' progress through the lessons. 

 

And (I'm hyperventilating!) this is only one of several great lessons in literature. Check this out...

http://ed.ted.com/lessons?category_id=221

 

And, literature is only one of several subjects represented.

 

BUT... just watch this video for an overview of the project. 

http://ed.ted.com/lessons/dear-subscribers

 

Probably the most inspiring 2:42 minute video I've seen in a loooong time!

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

Luis Alfonso Romero's curator insight, June 15, 2013 11:04 AM

Héroes- Beowulf

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10 things ESL students can do with Evernote on their tablets

10 things ESL students can do with Evernote on their tablets | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
Mohamed El-Ashiry takes a look at how Evernote can be used in the classroom
Portfolio assessment in the ESL classroom offers many benefits.
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50 Ways Lists

50 Ways Lists | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
The “50″ lists created over the last year have been a huge hit with teachers. So happy to know that these simple ideas are being used in classrooms everywhere. That’s what web 2.0 is all about.
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10 Sites for Online/Educational Tutorials

10 Sites for Online/Educational Tutorials | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
Online Tutorials or walk-throughs are great for self paced learning.  People have been using Google and YouTube to learn how to do things all the time.
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A to Z of correct English

A to Z of correct English | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
The A to Z of the most common mistakes a great book to help with earning English

Via Learning Basic English
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Learning Basic English's curator insight, February 11, 6:53 PM

Download the A to Z of common mistakes. A great book in PDF to help with learning English the English language.

 

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Winter Weather – A Vocabulary Lesson

Winter Weather – A Vocabulary Lesson | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
Winter weather always gives us something to talk about especially here in Wisconsin.
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SpellingCity

SpellingCity | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
SpellingCity is easily one of the best sites around for Spelling & Vocabulary.  This is a site used by educators around the world looking to help students learn their vocabulary and spelling words.
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Quick Step Guide: Storytelling Map Tour http://wp.me/p3qm8p-dj

Quick Step Guide: Storytelling Map Tour http://wp.me/p3qm8p-dj Quick Step Guide: Storytelling Map Tour limfab.wordpress.com See on Scoop.it – webtools Map Tours are an easy and interesting way to combine text, media (photos and videos), and and...
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More Resources On New Year’s Resolutions (and On New Year’s Celebrations)

More Resources On New Year’s Resolutions (and On New Year’s Celebrations) | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
First, here are a few more additions to The Best Ways To Help Make Your New Year’s Resolutions Succeed:
How to phrase your New Year’s resolutions is from The Boston Globe.
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My Grammar Lab

Create your own practice. Chose the grammar you want to study, decide how many questions you want to answer, then create your own test.


Via Nik Peachey, Tracee Orman
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Tracee Orman's curator insight, August 4, 2013 6:18 AM

I'll be checking it out. Sometimes I wish my students had iPads rather than MacBookPros. Crazy, I know...

Andy Lee's curator insight, August 4, 2013 10:32 AM

Will have to try this out.

Ruby Day's curator insight, August 5, 2013 3:31 PM

Will be looking at this for my writing class 

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Teaching phrases and expressions – a language teacher’s nightmare?

Tamás Lőrincz, a teacher and teacher trainer, shares his tips for tackling English phrases in and out of the classroom.
Do you know what Scotch Mist is? Honour bright? Before I started writing this post, I didn’t have a clue.
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The Great Gatsby - Movie Trailer, Photos, Synopsis

The Great Gatsby - Movie Trailer, Photos, Synopsis | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
In theaters May 10. From Baz Luhrmann, the director of Romeo + Juliet and Moulin Rouge, “The Great Gatsby” stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire, Carey Mulligan, Joel Edgerton and Isla Fisher.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, April 27, 2013 8:41 AM

There's always great potential for the creative English teacher on a film adaptation's official website. Many offer resources they think might be valuable for teachers. 

 

Though what they offer may or may not seem adequate on the surface, what they offer in the eyes of the creative English teacher can be adapted to levels well beyond merely adequate.

 

As I perused the Gatsby movie official site I noticed several opportunities to build engaging bridges between the contemporary adaptation, the student's contemporary interests, and the original story.

 

For example, under the GUIDE TO STYLE link, though the first view is just a bunch of images of fashion logos, clicking on each logo takes you to great info on the role of style, or a bit of the history of the brand, or a short film clip followed by behind the scenes interviews with the costume designer.

 

You know that your students are either openly fashionistas, or sub-counsciously tuned into the clothing trends they choose to follow. Maybe, a parallel project based upon the design of this portion of the website but based upon the various campus groups would be interesting. Or perhaps paralleling the concept here with the fashions of Cyrano or The Crucible or a favorite musical group or the characters on The Big Bang TV show, or they way people dressed in their parents' high school year books or... well, you get the idea.

 

_____

 

Be sure to note that when you click on one of the main menu links that there may be a sub menu.

 

For example, under the ABOUT THE FILM link, the synopsis is pretty minimal. But, if you click on the PRODUCTION NOTES sub link, you'll find a 49 page document. And, it's actually a PDF file so under the FILE menu of your internet browser you should be able to actually save the entire document to your hard drive.

_____

Under the SOUNDTRACK link there are audio samples from the film. But rather than using contemporary music, all the film's music was done by contemporary musicians. 

 

Why not consider giving  students an opportunity to see if any of their favorite comtemprary artists is on the list and then explore the relationship between what they already know about the artist and the artist's decision to be a part of this adaptation of a classic?

 

Or perhaps, they might feel intrigued by creating a "soundtrack" for a  film entitled "The Great (their name here)."  I'd add a little spice by telling them that the production company only had a couple of requests for budgetary and production purposes. 

 

1. For marketing purposes they had to have exactly 12 songs. no more no less.

2. The total play time had to be less than 1 hour so it would fit on a CD.

 

_____

Be sure to notice that the main menu links seem to run right off the screen on the right. Clicking the right arrow icon takes you to a few more interesting pages.

 

One is a page of downloadable images that might be useful in all sorts of projects.

 

But, don't overlook the MONOGRAM MAKER link. Here students can actually design a personalized monogram with their initials, their choice of background shape for the monogram, and  then actually create stationery that they can add a message to and send via email or use on a variety of social media posts.

 

What other creative bridges might be built by you OR by your students?

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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The 25 Best Websites for Literature Lovers

The 25 Best Websites for Literature Lovers | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
It's an interesting relationship that book lovers have with the Internet: most would rather read a physical book than something on an iPad or Kindle, and even though an Amazon purchase is just two ...

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 6, 2013 8:07 AM

My birthday falls at the end of August. I used to joke about my annual present being the official letter from my district informing me that I was to "get off my butt and get back to work." I'd say it as though it was a bummer.

 

But, truthfully I was always excited by the prospect of at least a dozen or more great ideas I'd come up with that I couldn't wait to try out with my kids. I knonw, referring to my high school students as "my kids" is not the professional terminology. But, they were my kids.

 

It was my extension of the "in parentus locus" responsibilities associated with caring about them. I took those responsibilities seriously. So seriously that when I walked out the door for the last time after nearly 40 years, I actually still regretted the two times I had actually sent a kid to the office for behavior problems that I had failed to find a way to deal with that was effective and at the same time a win-win from the kid's point of view as well as from mine.

 

But, we all know the pressures involved in the job; essay correcting, unreasonable parents, teen angst and egos, policy police, budgetary tug-o-wars, and the natural complications of such a multi-layered hierarchy of decision making whose final word is influenced so much by lay persons with little actual knowledge of the best practices and pedagogies that may or may not be what is the best practice or pedagogy for indivdual students.

 

I have no doubt that these sorts of elements of any job exist. Like most important work, it can be very hard, exhausting, and often frustrating at times.

 

And, we've all seen a veteran or two who have been defeated by these challenges and who have had their original enthusiasm and optimism sucked out of them to the point where the mechanisms they employ to deal with these challenges have become thick fortresses of insulation leaving students and colleagues with little to see of that teacher's original vim, vigor, and caring about both the subject matter and the students.

 

I discovered somewhere along the line that it is important to refresh that caring; to find ways to remember why we became educators. 

 

I came to think of the process as marinating in my love of literature or taking time to go to a literary spa of sorts whether I'd know I'd walk out of that "spa" feeling refreshed and invigorated. Sometimes that "spa" was a real location. A weekend at the Slyvia Beach Hotel (http://www.sylviabeachhotel.com) in Nye Beach, Oregon. Ah! An Oregon hotel on the ocean where every inch and moment is dedicated to book lovers. 

 

In reality, it did not take many "spa" experiences to remind me of my love of reading great literature. But, if one or two a year left me so refreshed, why not 10 or 20 or heck, why not 187 or so as in why not refresh every morning?

 

So I began getting up in time to spend a leisurely 30 minutes or so exploring a story or two at one of the many virtual spas on the internet where book lovers gather to share their love of literature. 

 

Sometimes I'd head off to TED TALKS (http://www.ted.com) and watch an inspiring talk about topics in all areas and remind myself that there was a time in my own youth when I too, like my own students hadn't yet discovered an interest in "this or that other curricular area." And, I'd remember some teacher who had found a way to make a previously "boring" subject fascinating. It might have been Mr. Tinling's geometry class, Ms Alexander's history class, Mr. Muńoz's Civics class. And, like these and other great teachers and like the great TED Talk speakers I would get a daily dose of love of teaching. 

 

How could I get to school and not want to be that kind of a teacher for "my kids"? 

 

It didn't eliminate the challenges. But it kept them in their proper perspective. And, remembering how much I'd come to love literature and how much I owe to those teachers who shared their love of literature in ways that even the reluctant might find unavoidably captivating proved to be just the daily dose I needed to remind me  that caring about "my kids" was the key to keeping the challenges associated with being an educator to be remembered in perspective. 

 

Take a quick look at these websites for literature lovers and think of them as virtual "daily spa treatments" where you just can't help but head off to another day with your kids as refreshed and enthusiastic as they hope all of their teachers will be that day.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

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HelloTalk Social Language Exchange App | Free Language

HelloTalk Social Language Exchange App | Free Language | TEFLTech | Scoop.it
Free Language Lessons, Mobile Apps, Podcasts, Courses, Audio, Video, Reviews, Articles, Translation
Fabrizio Bartoli's insight:

Thanks to FreeLanguage.org for sharing the useful link.

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