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10 things to do when starting a FabLab

10 things to do when starting a FabLab | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
After the post on the business models for FabLabs, and the post about the complex nature of a FabLab, in this post I would like to use my experience on building the Aalto FabLab in Helsinki and the...

Via Aurelie Ghalim
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Here come the 3D-printed 3D printers

Here come the 3D-printed 3D printers | FabLabRo | Scoop.it

The RepRap Wally and Simpson seen at this year's Maker Faire allow more range in 3D-printed object sizes. Look Ma, no rails!


Via Ionut Anton
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Bloodhound Supersonic Car - The 1,000 mph car - Fastest Car on Earth

A team of British scientists and engineers have created a full scale model for a car they intend to drive more than 1,000 mph. 

The model, named the Bloodhound SuperSonic Car (SSC), was built by a team of aerodynamic experts, who took three years to build it. Recently shown off to the world at the Farnborough International Air Show, the 42-foot-long Bloodhound resembles a bright blue missile with wheels. 

For now, it's just a model, but the wheels are in motion to create the real deal. According to an article from the BBC, aerospace manufacturer Hampson Industries "will begin building the rear of the vehicle in the first quarter of 2011." Apparently, another deal to create the front end of the car is close to being finalized. 

Not surprisingly, news that there may soon exist a car capable of hitting four digits on the speedometer moved the search needle. Immediately, online lookups for "bloodhound car," "supersonic car," and "bloodhound car pictures" roared into breakout status. 

Of course, nobody makes an obscenely fast car just to take its picture. As soon as the Bloodhound is fully assembled, hopefully by late 2011 or early 2012, the team will attempt to sniff out a new world land speed record. The current record belongs to the Thrust SuperSonic Car, which hit 763 mph back in 1997. 

Incidentally, several of the key people involved in the Thrust vehicle also worked on the Bloodhound, including driver Andy Green, who is also a Fighter Pilot in the Royal Air Force. Here, Mr. Green discusses some of the car's impressive/terrifying capabilities. One fact to wet your appetite: The Bloodhound has a grand total of 135,000 horsepower, which is equal to 180 times the power of a formula one car. Buckle up!


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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3D Printing and Planned Obsolescence

3D Printing and Planned Obsolescence | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
The capability for product personalization and customization in the Third Industrial Revolution offers a way to eliminate the traditional roll-out of "this year's model" and the concept of planned ...

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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3D printing is changing art

3D printing is changing art | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
Whether to create models or finished works, the use of 3D printing in fine-art sculpture is still relatively rare. Those who employ it expect it grow.

Via Argos Oz
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Bioprinting

Bioprinting uses a 3D printing process to create synthetic human tissue. One day it could therefore be used to print replacement human organs. This video by Christopher Barnatt explores future medical and cosmetic bioprinting applications.

Via João Greno Brogueira
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MakerScanner - open source 3d scanning

MakerScanner - open source 3d scanning | FabLabRo | Scoop.it

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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FABBING PRACTICES- AN ETHNOGRAPHY IN FAB LAB AMSTERDAM

This thesis, based on an ethnographic approach, investigates personal fabrication.

Via Aurelie Ghalim, bar-fab-lab
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3D Forensic facial reconstruction, Visualforensic 2013 feb

Forensic facial reconstruction of former french king Henri IV killed in 1610, and based on the CTscan database of his skull. Made with Cinema 4D R13, VrayForC4D…

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, March 3, 2013 7:56 PM

This is very cool indeed!

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.fluid – A reactive surface

Imagine surfaces start to communicate with you. Your mobile gets goose skin when your lover texts you. Your WiFi controller changes the look and feel of it's surface…

Via Tudor Cosmatu
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A story of discovery by Neri Oxman


Via Artilect FabLab Toulouse
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4lettres's curator insight, March 20, 2013 7:48 PM

#lab #question #fablab #MIT #3Dprinting

 

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Teen Creates 3D Printed, Brain-Powered Prosthetic Arm

Teen Creates 3D Printed, Brain-Powered Prosthetic Arm | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
Seventeen-year-old Easton LaChappelle has created a 3D printed robotic prosthetic arm controlled by brainwaves that he hopes will bring an affordable, functional artificial limb to the masses. Oh, ...
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Pwdr - Open source powder-based rapid prototyping machine

Pwdr - Open source powder-based rapid prototyping machine | FabLabRo | Scoop.it

Via Andrea Graziano
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Space-miners to crush asteroids and 3D print satellites - space - 23 January 2013 - New Scientist

Space-miners to crush asteroids and 3D print satellites - space - 23 January 2013 - New Scientist | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
Once a wacky idea, commercial asteroid exploration has become a race, with the launch of a second company focused on mining near-Earth space rocks
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MIT's new software increases the speed and flexibility of multi-material 3D printing

MIT's new software increases the speed and flexibility of multi-material 3D printing | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
A team at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has developed a new 3D printing software pipeline that allows multiple materials to...

Via Andrea Graziano
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Evolving Soft Robots with Multiple Materials (muscle, bone, etc.)

Here we evolve the bodies of soft robots made of multiple materials (muscle, bone, & support tissue) to move quickly. Evolution produces a diverse array of f...

Via Andrea Graziano
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Chair 'grows like popcorn'

Chair 'grows like popcorn' | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
Belgian designer Carl de Smet discusses his experiments with smart foam technology, which allows him to 'bake' furniture so it assembles itself.

Via Alessio Erioli
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Technology Is Starting To Give People Superpowers, Like Telekinesis

Technology Is Starting To Give People Superpowers, Like Telekinesis | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
In the summer of 1935, a pair of Bavarian climbers arrived in the Bernese Alps, hoping to become the first people ever to scale the monstrous north face of the mountain known as the Eiger. On their first day, they made good progress.

On the second day, less so, and on the third, even less. Then a storm swept over the mountain and they froze to death. The next year, four more mountaineers attempted the face, and all four died. After a third failed attempt in 1937, a quartet of climbers finally reached the summit in 1938, taking three days to get there.

Twelve years and many more fatalities later, a pair of climbers managed to surmount the Eiger in 18 hours. The 1960s saw the first successful solo climb. In 1988, Alison Hargreaves climbed the Eiger while six months pregnant. By the 1990s, people were making the climb in the dead of winter. In 2008, Swiss climber Euli Steck speed-climbed the peak, solo, in winter, in 2 hours, 47 minutes, and 33 seconds. You can watch the video. Last month, a trio of Brits stood on a ledge near the top of the Eiger, then spread their arms and legs like wings and flew down.

The Eiger hasn’t gotten any shorter or less steep, nor the conditions any gentler. Rather, humans have grown stronger, more skilled, and better equipped. The relative ease of scaling the Eiger today is the result partly of a series of portable and wearable technologies—ultralight synthetic fabrics, custom crampons—that have turned human climbers into superhuman climbing (and flying) machines. But lest you think it's all in the tools, American Dean Potter ascended the face in 2008 with his bare hands.

Granted, the ability to climb an Alp in less than three hours isn’t a particularly dramatic superpower by comic-book standards. It’s not like anyone’s leaping to the summit in a single bound. But if Marvel and DC Comics have conditioned us to think of superhuman abilities as freakish and far-fetched, science and history are teaching us otherwise. It turns out we don’t need genetic mutations, lightning strikes, or laboratory experiments gone awry to produce people with extraordinary physical and mental capabilities. Human enhancement is happening all the time, largely through incremental improvements on existing technologies. And contrary to those who would have you believe that the golden era of innovation is behind us, the rate of this progress shows no signs of slowing. It just doesn’t always follow the paths that the experts predict.


Via Wildcat2030
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Lego Robot Folds and Flings a Paper Airplane

Lego Robot Folds and Flings a Paper Airplane | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
NXTLOG user hknssn13 built this amazing paper airplane machine. My favorite part is the 4th stage, where four linear actuators make the final folds in the airplane. It looks sick when the entire assembly rises up!

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, March 14, 2013 8:07 AM

This is an AMAZING engineering feat.  Great for CTE-STEM students to study and think about.

cassian bulger's curator insight, March 22, 2013 5:33 AM

inovative ideas such as these making robotics available to the general public are ingenious in my opinion as they help society adapt to robotics aswell as bring the awe in seeing what you can create.

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Bacteria farming and Software design.

Bacteria farming and Software design. | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
This is an article about my creative process behind Paelodictyon, a site...
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Nine Business Applications For Google Glass. - Forbes

Nine Business Applications For Google Glass. - Forbes | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
Google Glass Google just announced Google Glass will be available by the end of 2013.

Via Wildcat2030, Alessio Erioli
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Wildcat2030's curator insight, March 2, 2013 6:25 AM

interesting,most apps are to do with sharing..

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Your Next Computer Will Live on Your Arm | Wired Business | Wired.com

Your Next Computer Will Live on Your Arm | Wired Business | Wired.com | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
Forget about robots rising up against humans for world domination.

In the future we’re all going to be robot-human hybrids with the help of wearable computers. We’ve already seen Google Glass, the search giant’s augmented-reality glasses, and now the latest Y Combinator startup to come out of stealth, Thalmic Labs, is giving us a wrist cuff that will one day control computers, smartphones, gaming consoles, and remote-control devices with simple hand gestures.

Unlike voice-detecting Google Glass, and the camera-powered Kinect and Leap Motion controller, Thalmic Labs is going to the source of your hand and finger gestures – your forearm muscles. “In looking at wearable computers, we realized there are problems with input for augmented-reality devices,” says Thalmic Labs co-founder Stephen Lake. “You can use voice, but no one wants to be sitting on the subway talking to themselves, and cameras can’t follow wherever you go.”

I’d argue that thanks to Bluetooth headsets and Siri, we’ve already been talking to ourselves for the last decade, so talking to my glasses isn’t a huge stretch. But, I won’t deny that it looks cool to casually flick my hand to change the song on my MacBook, which is what Thalmic Labs is promising with its $149 forearm gadget called the Myo (a nod to the Greek prefix for muscle, but rhymes with Leo), which has an adjustable band that can accommodate almost anyone.


Via Wildcat2030, Alessio Erioli
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Snapshotic's curator insight, February 26, 2013 1:14 PM

add your insight...

petabush's curator insight, February 27, 2013 3:33 AM

Interesting connection of  simple gestures and functions. 

 

'Same old, same old' regarding the aesthetics, and how such a device that works with the body is working and being on the body.

 

Such objects are integrating with the body and the person. through them we have the opportunity to consider issues of embodiment and sense of self. These objects are both an interal and external interface and therefore represent the personal and public body/person. They should not be afraid of demonstrating this!

 

 

Cláudio Braune Gusmão's curator insight, March 9, 2013 8:59 AM

É sabido que embora tenham significado avanços indiscutíveis, o mouse, teclado, monitores foram[são], como afirma Flusser em O Mundo Codificado "Obstáculos para a remoção de obstáculos". Tivemos que nos adaptar a estas maravilhas mesmo que isto significasse conviver com dores (L.E.R.) nos braços e ombros. Gestos são muito mais naturais e desde experimentos com sensores que captam movimento o campo da Interatividade revela uma atraçao incontrolável pela gestualidade para interagir. Quando pudemos acessar o Nintendo Wii, Xbox Kinect, PS3 Move, pudemos experimentar a maravilha da computação física aliada ao gesto. Lindo! Ano passado tive contato com o LeapMotion https://www.leapmotion.com/ que apresenta certos avanços em relação a interação com computadores e dispositivos de uma maneira muito bacana. Fiz o pre-order e devo receber o meu a partidr de maio/13. Esta semana conheci o MYO (https://getmyo.com/) que traz uma outra proposta. Um bracelete (armband) que promete reconhecer o movimento de seus músculos do braço possibilitando diversas combinações interativas para o controle de vários dispositivos. Não resisti e fiz o pre-order apra recebê-lo provavelmente em 1 ano. Amobos LeapMotion e MYO distribuíram os dispositivos para desenvolvedores diversos para que estes desenvolvam applicativos e com isso, ao distribuir efetivamente sua produção os usuários tenham acesso a milhares de apps para utilizar. É isso aí....

Rescooped by Ina Dumitriu from Artilect Fab Lab Toulouse
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Better than the 3D pen !

A new way to use an extruder...


Via Artilect FabLab Toulouse
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10 things to do when starting a FabLab

10 things to do when starting a FabLab | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
After the post on the business models for FabLabs, and the post about the complex nature of a FabLab, in this post I would like to use my experience on building the Aalto FabLab in Helsinki and the...

Via Aurelie Ghalim
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A US$49 personal autonomous micro UAV?

A US$49 personal autonomous micro UAV? | FabLabRo | Scoop.it
The MeCam is a tiny autonomous quadrotor UAV currently in development, that may sell for less than $50.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Mic Josi's comment, February 3, 2013 5:46 AM
nice
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The science behind 'beatboxing'

The science behind 'beatboxing' | FabLabRo | Scoop.it

Using the mouth, lips, tongue and voice to generate sounds that one might never expect to come from the human body is the specialty of the artists known as beatboxers. Now scientists have used scanners to peer into a beatboxer as he performed his craft to reveal the secrets of this mysterious art.

 

The human voice has long been used to generate percussion effects in many cultures, including North American scat singing, Celtic lilting and diddling, and Chinese kouji performances. In southern Indian classical music, konnakol is the percussive speech of the solkattu rhythmic form.  In contemporary pop music, the relatively young vocal art form of beatboxing is an element of hip-hop culture.

 

Until now, the phonetics of these percussion effects were not examined in detail. For instance, it was unknown to what extent beatboxers produced sounds already used within human language.


Via Ashish Umre, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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