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Breakfasts Around the World


Via Seth Dixon, Marie-claude Ouellet
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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:03 AM

These pictures are very interesting and makes you think about the kinds of breakfast you saw when growing up. These pictures allow us to see the kinds of food cultivated in these areas of the world and how they interprete the use of each one. The pictures also show us how each place is related. For example, some of the dishes looked alike in that most of the plate was breads. It makes you wonder where that tradition came from. These pictures also let the viewer in on the development or wealth of the country. Some countries only have a piece of bread and a coffee for breakfast, where other places have huge platefuls of all different kinds of food. Does the amount of food you eat for breakfast have to do with how developed your country is? Food seems so simple, but it can lead to many different interpretations for people. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:17 AM

Typically when I think about different cultural foods I think about lunch or dinner rather than breakfast. When I think about Italy I think about meatballs, pasta, pizza, and gelato. When I think about Germany I think about a lot of meats. However what never really comes to mind is breakfast. Breakfast is one of my absolute favorite meals on the day. I love going out to breakfast and getting some eggs, homefries, sausage, and maybe even a grilled blueberry muffin. This summer I traveled to Italy and that was the first time I realized that breakfast is just as different in their Culture as their lunch and dinner. It was interesting how different things were. They had toast and yogurt, but the yogurt didn't taste the same as it does in America.  It is amazing how different each countries breakfast is in comparison to what we are used to. Some things we consider lunch might be served in another countries breakfast meal. For example Deli meats. It is interesting to see how different each culture really is. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:10 AM

Countries each have their own foods that are unique and freshly made by families everyday. They use foods that are frequently grown and found in the area to make their meals. For example china eats a lot of fish because it is part of their culture. Also people of spanish and mexican cultures are known for cooking spicy delcious foods. Food is apart of what creates cultures.

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How Learning a Second Language Teaches Better Communication Skills

How Learning a Second Language Teaches Better Communication Skills | FLE | Scoop.it
As communicators, we’re always looking for new ways to improve the way we write, speak and, well, communicate.  Maybe we follow writing blogs to find tips or even watch YouTube videos on how to im…

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, June 29, 2014 2:32 AM

As communicators, we’re always looking for new ways to improve the way we write, speak and, well, communicate.  Maybe we follow writing blogs to find tips or even watch YouTube videos on how to improve our public speaking. One thing that never seems to be talked about is how learning a second language opens a whole new window of opportunity to learn how other people in this big ol’ world are communicating and what we can take away from that.  Here are my top four takeaways

1. Things Don’t Always Translate Word for Word

More often than not, phrases and sentences aren’t going to translate perfectly.  You can’t read through a sentence, translating it word for word and expecting the combination to make sense at the end.  You learn to look at the entire context of a phrase or sentence and make the connection to its equivalent in your native language.  Being able to search for and find contextual connections in a second language makes it easier to do the same in your first.

2. It Takes Courage to Use It

You spend all this time studying and learning new vocabulary and verb tenses and conjugations, and you feel like you have a pretty good grasp on this thing.  Then you’re faced with actually having to use it with a native speaker.  For whatever reason, even the most prepared individuals will tell you how nervous they were for this moment.  You hope that you’ll sound fluent enough and that you’ll be able to remember all of those verb tenses and adjective agreements.  It’s nerve-racking because we fear messing up.  It forces you to get out there and practice what you’ve learned and make mistakes while doing it.   What better way to learn? 

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3. It Offers a New Way of Looking at Your Own Language

When you look at language from the same vantage point for your entire life, you miss out on other ways you could be looking at it to make your writing and speaking crisper and sharper.  For instance, American English speakers all too often leave those dangling prepositions at the ends of their sentences.  In many romance languages, for example, dangling prepositions don’t exist because they just don’t fit anywhere else but their proper place.  Look at “What street do you live on?” vs. “On what street do you live?”  Training yourself similarly to that “romantic way” will make you conscious to those little details in English, too.

4. It Teaches Culture & People

Learning a language is learning an entire rhetorical culture that opens the door into what its people are like.  You can find out if this group or that group might tend to be more casual or formal in conversation.  Maybe they have six words that all mean “happy,” but which one do the locals use?  They know the different connotations, and that, too, will give insight to what kind of words are going to speak to them when being addressed.  Being forced to choose the right word with the right connotation, even though they all mean “happy” to us, is another way to practice making sure that how we say thingstakes precedent to what we are saying

In short, learning a new language forces you to take a closer look at the way you use your native one.  You learn different contexts and connotations and how to use the right word at the right time.  Sounds familiar, right?  Looking into how other people around the world use their words to communicate their ideas teaches you yet another less talked about way to approach your own communications.  So if you’ve been contemplating whether or not to start those vocabulary lessons, do it!  There are even free apps like duolingo and Babbel to help you out!

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Google Translate saves your favorite translations with Phrasebook

Google Translate saves your favorite translations with Phrasebook | FLE | Scoop.it
If you’re learning a second language, you’ve probably noticed that it’s hard to commit new phrases to memory. Google is trying to take on the problem by adding a new feature to Google...

Via Charles Tiayon
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Foreign language training helps students land jobs - Central Michigan Life

Foreign language training helps students land jobs - Central Michigan Life | FLE | Scoop.it
Foreign language training helps students land jobs
Central Michigan Life
Looking at an object as simple as a pencil can often elicit completely different meanings for speakers of foreign languages.
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Parents Want Kids to Use Mobile Devices in Schools

Parents Want Kids to Use Mobile Devices in Schools | FLE | Scoop.it

Some 45 percent of parents said they either had already purchased or planned to purchase a mobile device to support their children’s education, and 56 percent said they’d be willing to purchase a mobile device if their child’s school required it. About half of parents’ high school students carry smartphones to school, parents said.

By contrast, only 16 percent of schools had a policy that allowed students to use their own mobile devices in class, according to parents, while only 17 percent said their children were required to use a mobile device—owned either by the school or the student—as part of their education.


Via Nik Peachey, Marie-claude Ouellet
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 8, 2013 5:29 PM

Some interesting statistics here

CitizenTekk's comment, May 9, 2013 1:18 AM
Why do I not believe this? I'd want my kid to put the phone down and read his/her book!
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Singing, rather than saying, phrases in a foreign language makes them easier to remember

Singing, rather than saying, phrases in a foreign language makes them easier to remember | FLE | Scoop.it

A new study published in the journal in Memory and Cognition, has found that adults learning phrases in Hungarian were better able to match the words with their English counterparts when they learned the phrase by singing it. Lead author, linguist Dr Karen M Ludke of the University of Edinburgh, became interested in whether singing could help in learning a language when she was teaching English as a second language in New York.

 

"I started using a lot of song and music in my lessons, so they could practise when I wasn't around," she says. "Then I started to doubt myself a little bit. I thought, 'Is this scientific?, Is this actually beneficial to use song to teach?'"

 

"I started to look into it, using Google Scholar to find out what research there was out there, and I did find a lot of stuff from teachers [saying it worked], but I couldn't find anything that actually compared singing with a spoken presentation."

 

Ludke decided to answer the question herself and enrolled for a Masters and then a PhD. In her study, sixty people aged between 18 and 29 were split into three groups.

 

One group heard spoken English phrases followed by a spoken Hungarian translation, another group heard the Hungarian phrase being sung, and a third group heard the Hungarian phrases being with the same rhythm as the song, rather like a chant.

 

She says Hungarian was chosen as the test language because it is unfamiliar to most English speakers and it is quite different from both the Germanic languages and the Romance languages such as French and Italian.

 

The study results showed that people who had heard the Hungarian phrases being sung performed significantly better than the other groups. In particular, when they heard the English phrases again they were better able to repeat the correct Hungarian phrase. And they were more likely to be able to translate the Hungarian phrases back into English as well.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Bilingualism boosts the brain at all ages

Bilingualism boosts the brain at all ages | FLE | Scoop.it
Learning a second language benefits the brain in ways that can pay off later in life, suggests a deepening field of research that specializes on relationship between bilingualism and cognition.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, June 29, 2014 4:54 PM

Learning a second language benefits the brain in ways that can pay off later in life, suggests a deepening field of research that specializes in the relationship between bilingualism and cognition.

Mounting evidence suggests that learning more than one language benefits the aging brain.

Ori Mazor, 6, counts in English, French and Hebrew at home. Her parents want her to learn the languages for cultural and cognitive benefits. (CBC)

In one large Scottish test, researchers discovered archival data on 835 native speakers of English who were born in Edinburgh in 1936. The participants had been given an intelligence test at age 11 as part of standard British educational policy and many were retested in their early 70s.

Those who spoke two or more languages had significantly better cognitive abilities on certain tasks compared with what would be expected from their IQ test scores at age 11, Dr. Thomas Bak of the Centre for Cognitive Aging and Cognitive Epidemiology at the University of Edinburgh reported in the journal Annals of Neurology.

"Our results suggest a protective effect of bilingualism against age-related cognitive decline," independently of IQ, Bak and his co-authors concluded.

Roots of bilingualism research in Canada

It was a watershed study in 1962 by Elizabeth Peal and Wallace Lambert at McGill University in Montreal that turned conventional thinking on bilingualism on its head and set the rationale for French immersion in Canada.


Psychologists at York University in Toronto have also been studying the effect of bilingualism on the brain across the lifespan, including dementia. They’ve learned how people who speak a second language outperform those with just one on tasks that tap executive function such as attention, selection and inhibition. Those are the high-level cognitive processes we use to multitask as we drive on the highway and juggle remembering the exit and monitoring our speed without getting distracted by billboards.

For the brain, the combination of those tasks is complex and taxes the energy resources, said Ellen Bialystok, who runs a cognitive research lab at York. She first observed how bilingual children perform better in the 1980s.

"What a bilingual always has to do is draw attention to the right language, and keep that other active language out of the way. Now the system that selects, inhibits, and switches is the executive function system. That means that every time a bilingual opens their mouth, they're using their executive function system. It's getting practised, it's getting fortified, and it's becoming more efficient," Bialystok said.

York University psychology professor Ellen Bialystock studies bilingualism's effects on the brain. (Penn State/Flickr)

Aside from the social and cultural benefits of bilingualism, there’s also a payoff later in life as memory begins to fail in everyone. Those who are bilingual build up networks in the brain’s frontal system. Located behind the forehead, the system is the last to develop in childhood and the first to decline in the final stage of our lives, Bialystok said.

While bilingualism has more benefits the earlier and more intensely it's practised, it is never too late to learn, a finding borne out in the Scottish study. Bilingualism is good for the brain and it’s the cheapest way to build it up, she said.

The Mazor family of Montreal sees the benefits of bilingualism across three generations.

"Kids' brains are like a sponge," said father Ben Mazor, who speaks English, French and Hebrew. "They absorb everything and it comes to them so easy while they're young. So why not give them the privilege of learning another language that might as well benefit them in the future."

Mother Natalie Mazor, who also speaks Arabic, said she’s not concerned that her daughter Ori, 6, and sons Azi, 4, and Tal, 2, will be confused by the constant switches in language at home. All three children understand Hebrew, but will sometimes answer in English.

"It's just the dynamics of our home and it's the way that we're brought up. It's very important for their future," she said.

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E-teaching French as a second language

Two second-language e-teachers give an inside look at the early days of pioneering teaching French as a second language online to rural students in Newfoundl...
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