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Solving the biggest question in physics soon? Towards a Macroscopic Quantum Superposition

Solving the biggest question in physics soon? Towards a Macroscopic Quantum Superposition | Eyes wide open | Scoop.it

The biggest single problem of all of physics is how to reconcile gravity and quantum mechanics,” said Philip Stamp, a theoretical physicist at the University of British Columbia. “All of a sudden, it’s clear there is a target. Physicists have devised experiments that can probe the interface between quantum mechanics and general relativity.

 

Theorists are thinking through how the experiments might play out, and what each outcome would mean for a more complete theory merging quantum mechanics and general relativity. “Neither of them has ever failed,” Stamp said. “They’re incompatible. If experiments can get to grips with that conflict, that’s a big deal.”

 

Gravity curves space and time around massive objects. What happens when such objects are put in quantum superpositions, causing space-time to curve in two different ways?

 

What happens next depends on which of two extremely well-tested but conflicting theories is correct: quantum mechanics or Einstein’s theory of general relativity; these describe the small- and large-scale properties of the universe, respectively.

 

In a strange quantum mechanical effect called “superposition,” the photon simultaneously passes through and reflects backward off the mirror; it then both strikes and doesn’t strike the ball. If quantum mechanics works at the macroscopic level, then the ball will both begin oscillating and stay still, entering a superposition of the two states. Because the ball has mass, its gravitational field will also split into a superposition.

 

But according to general relativity, gravity warps space and time around the ball. The theory cannot tolerate space and time warping in two different ways, which could destabilize the superposition, forcing the ball to adopt one state or the other.

 

Knowing what happens to the ball could help physicists resolve the conflict between quantum mechanics and general relativity. But such experiments have long been considered infeasible: Only photon-size entities can be put in quantum superpositions, and only ball-size objects have detectable gravitational fields. Quantum mechanics and general relativity dominate in disparate domains, and they seem to converge only in enormously dense, quantum-size black holes. In the laboratory, as the physicist Freeman Dyson wrote in 2004, “any differences between their predictions are physically undetectable.”

In the past two years, that widely held view has begun to change.

 

With the help of new precision instruments and clever approaches for indirectly probing imperceptible effects, experimentalists are now taking steps toward investigating the interface between quantum mechanics and general relativity in tests like the one with the photon and the ball. The new experimental possibilities are revitalizing the 80-year-old quest for a theory of quantum gravity.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Quantum physics proves that there IS an afterlife, claims scientist

Quantum physics proves that there IS an afterlife, claims scientist | Eyes wide open | Scoop.it

Professor Robert Lanza from North Carolina, believes the theory of biocentrism teaches death as we know it is an illusion, and space and time are just 'tools of our minds'.


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Million Lines of Code - Information Is Beautiful

Million Lines of Code - Information Is Beautiful | Eyes wide open | Scoop.it

Is a million lines of code a lot? How many lines of code are there in Windows? Facebook? iPhone apps? How about a bacterium, a human being, or all the data in the genome database at NIH?


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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odysseas spyroglou's curator insight, November 17, 2013 8:42 AM

More data for data. More statistics, better decisions.

Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:27 AM

Glad to see that the Human Genome is still way out there.



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The Case for Studying Physics in a Charming Animated Video ...

The Case for Studying Physics in a Charming Animated Video ... | Eyes wide open | Scoop.it
httpv://vimeo.com/64951553 Xiangjun Shi, otherwise known as Shixie, studied animation at RISD and physics at Brown. Then, she harnessed her training in both.
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Rescooped by Diana Dragomirescu from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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Why One Woman Studies Physics

Why One Woman Studies Physics | Eyes wide open | Scoop.it
In this short animated video, Xiangjun Shi (who goes by "Shixie") explains why she studies Physics. Of course, it helps that she also studied Animation, so can make great stuff like this.

Via Thomas Faltin
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7 Impressive Health Benefits of Chia Seeds - organicauthority.com - Organic Living

7 Impressive Health Benefits of Chia Seeds - organicauthority.com - Organic Living | Eyes wide open | Scoop.it
Once you learn the health benefits of chia seeds, you'll want to add them to everything!

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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'Why Do I Study Physics?': An Animated Short About Learning to Appreciate the Incongruities of the Universe

'Why Do I Study Physics?': An Animated Short About Learning to Appreciate the Incongruities of the Universe | Eyes wide open | Scoop.it
"Why Do I Study Physics?" is an animated short by Xiangjun Shi that captures the intense fascination with the mysteries of the universe that comes with a love for physics.

Via Thomas Faltin
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