Eye on Literature
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New Yorker writer returns to high school English class — for a year. Excerpt from David Denby’s new book, ‘Lit Up’

New Yorker writer returns to high school English class — for a year. Excerpt from David Denby’s new book, ‘Lit Up’ | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
Denby "embedded” in a tenth-grade English class to see what happened as a good teacher worked with 15-year-olds. He read everything the kids read and listened all year, interviewing kids along the way.
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Fiction highlights for 2016

Fiction highlights for 2016 | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
A host of strong debuts plus new novels from Don DeLillo, Julian Barnes, Geoff Dyer and Nicola Barker promise a strong year for fiction
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All Stories Are the Same

All Stories Are the Same | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
From Avatar to The Wizard of Oz, Aristotle to Shakespeare, there’s one clear form that dramatic storytelling has followed since its inception.
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Tolstoy from the pages of the Guardian and Observer

Tolstoy from the pages of the Guardian and Observer | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it

With Tolstoy’s War and Peace returning for a new screen adaptation, we look back at the esteemed author’s life and work through the Guardian and Observer archives

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What is the Good Life? Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, & Kant’s Ideas in 4 Animated Videos

What is the Good Life? Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, & Kant’s Ideas in 4 Animated Videos | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it

We all have some vision of what the good life should look like. Days filled with reading and strolls through museums, retirement to a tropical island, unlimited amounts of time for video games….

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Winnie the Pooh: The real story behind A A Milne's classic books

Winnie the Pooh: The real story behind A A Milne's classic books | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
The real-life family saga – and the chance meeting between a soldier and a bear cub – that inspired one of the greatest children's books of all time
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A Point of View: The writer who foresaw the rise of the totalitarian state - BBC News

A Point of View: The writer who foresaw the rise of the totalitarian state - BBC News | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
Dostoyevsky's characters justify murder in the name of ideological beliefs - which make them as relevant today as they were in 19th Century Russia.
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Liu Cixin Is China’s Answer to Arthur C. Clarke - The New Yorker

Liu Cixin Is China’s Answer to Arthur C. Clarke - The New Yorker | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
China’s most popular science-fiction writer writes strange and remarkable fables about human progress—and its limits.
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600+ Covers of Philip K. Dick Novels from Around the World: Greece, Japan, Poland & Beyond

600+ Covers of Philip K. Dick Novels from Around the World: Greece, Japan, Poland & Beyond | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
I envy book designers tasked with putting together covers for Philip K. Dick novels, and yet I don’t envy them.
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The 100 best novels: No 74 – Lord of the Flies by William Golding (1954)

The 100 best novels: No 74 – Lord of the Flies by William Golding (1954) | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
Dismissed at first as “rubbish & dull”, Golding’s brilliantly observed dystopian desert island tale has since become a classicLike all the recent novels in this list (69-73), Lord of the Flies owes much of its dark power and impetus to the second...
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Young Dickens in love: sugary, and waxing lyrical about gloves

Young Dickens in love: sugary, and waxing lyrical about gloves | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
A new exhibition explores the faltering relationship between the novelist and his first love Maria Beadnell – and the resulting, questionable, poetry
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The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies - Cult of Pedagogy

The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies - Cult of Pedagogy | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
When I worked with student teachers on developing effective lesson plans, one thing I always asked them to revise was the phrase “We will discuss.”

We will discuss the video.

We will discuss the story.

We will discuss our results.

Every time I saw it in a lesson plan, I would add a  note: “What format will you use? What questions will you ask? How will you ensure that all students participate?” I was pretty sure that We will discuss actually meant the teacher would do most of the talking; He would throw out a couple of questions like “So what did you think about the video?” or “What was the theme of the story?” and a few students would respond, resulting in something that looked  like a discussion, but was ultimately just a conversation between the teacher and a handful of extroverted students; a classic case of Fisheye Teaching.

The problem wasn’t them; in most of the classrooms where they’d sat as students, that’s exactly what a class discussion looked like. They didn’t know any other “formats.” I have only ever been familiar with a few myself. But when teachers began contacting me recently asking for a more comprehensive list, I knew it was time to do some serious research.

Via John Evans
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, February 22, 12:57 PM

Discussion is required for learning in every level of classrooms. This article offers both  high level planning and low level planning. Well worth the time to read this.

Susan Wegmann's curator insight, April 22, 12:20 PM
Genuine class discussions -- singing my song!
Ainsley Ballinger's curator insight, May 2, 12:02 AM

Great ideas to promote in-class discussion. Will be referring to when creating lesson plans for my placement. 

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Did an English Scientist’s Electrical Experiments Inspire Frankenstein?

Did an English Scientist’s Electrical Experiments Inspire <i>Frankenstein</i>? | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
Following in the illustrious footsteps of the likes of Bela Lugosi, Lon Chaney Jr, Peter Cushing and Gene Wilder, James McAvoy plays the mad scientist Victor Frankenstein in the latest film version of Mary Shelley’s gothic novel, this time with Daniel Radcliffe in tow as his assistant Igor.The film promises all the lightning, grave-robbing, and fantastical elements we’ve come to expect from the st...
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Authors share their reading resolutions for 2016 – now share yours!

Authors share their reading resolutions for 2016 – now share yours! | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it

From ‘bookending’ every day, to full digital detox to reading more books in translation, authors including Louise O’Neill, Meg Rosoff, Katherine Rundell, Philip Reeve, Francesca Simon and Juno Dawson (nee James) reveal reading-related...

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Hook, line, and sinker: the best opening lines in children’s and young adult fiction

Hook, line, and sinker: the best opening lines in children’s and young adult fiction | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
You only get one chance at a first impression, and never is this truer than with the opening lines of books. Ciara Murphy compiles some of her favourites, from The Catcher in the Rye to Twilight, and The Hobbit to Harry Potter
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Mark Twain Knocks New Year’s Resolutions: They’re a “Harmless Annual Institution, Of No Particular Use to Anybody”

Mark Twain Knocks New Year’s Resolutions: They’re a “Harmless Annual Institution, Of No Particular Use to Anybody” | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it

Now that another New Year's Day has come around, we must once again ask ourselves: do we believe in New Year's resolutions, or don't we?

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74 Ways Characters Die in Shakespeare’s Plays Shown in a Handy Infographic: From Snakebites to Lack of Sleep

74 Ways Characters Die in Shakespeare’s Plays Shown in a Handy Infographic: From Snakebites to Lack of Sleep | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
In the graduate department where I once taught freshmen and sophomores the rudiments of college English, it became common practice  to include Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus on many an Intro to Lit syllabus, along with a viewing of Julie Taymor’s flamboyant film adaptation.
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Dear Amy Nehzooukammyatootill, by Aimee Nezhukumatathil : The Poetry Foundation

Dear Amy Nehzooukammyatootill, by  Aimee  Nezhukumatathil  : The Poetry Foundation | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
If I were to ask you a question about your book / and sum it up into one word it would be, Why? / I think I like Walt Whitman better than you. I just don't / get literature, but for a fast hour and a half read, your book
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What Makes the Russian Literature of the 19th Century So Distinctive?

What Makes the Russian Literature of the 19th Century So Distinctive? | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
Francine Prose and Benjamin Moser discuss the great Russian writers and their approach to the human heart and soul.
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How Writing Fiction Masters Fear

How Writing Fiction Masters Fear | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
When novelist Harriet Lane received a serious diagnosis, she started telling stories that let her meet anxiety on her own terms.
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Don’t Be an Author—Be an Authorpreneur! and Other News

Don’t Be an Author—Be an Authorpreneur! and Other News | Eye on Literature | Scoop.it
“Please read my book.” From a 1917 poster for The Traveling Salesman.
“People don’t want moral complexity. Moral complexity is a luxury. You might be forced to read it in school, but a lot of people have hard lives.
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Penguin Classics - Take the Little Black Classics for a spin

Discover the Little Black Classics - a new series of 80 books for 80p each, celebrating Penguin's 80th birthday
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