Exploring cultural influences and other factors affecting identity
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Playground - Nadia Wheatley

Playground - Nadia Wheatley | Exploring cultural influences and other factors affecting identity | Scoop.it

Playground by Nadia Wheatley. Indigenous perspective on cultural influences and other factors affecting identity. 

Helene Agamalis's insight:

Playground by Nadia Wheatley is an excellent resource which can be used as a stimulus to guide students into exploring elements of Aboriginal identity. This book comprises of Indigenous artwork entwined with a series of short stories which gives readers a rich insight into how Aboriginal identity has changed over time. Using the book as the basis for teaching and learning, a range of activities suitable for stage 3 students may be created and can be linked with a number of KLA’s that can be very useful in achieving a range of intended outcomes. For example, focusing on the chapters, “Getting Bush Tucker”, “Going Hunting” and “Going fishing” the class could discuss what is meant by bush tucker and go on to research what bush tucker exists in our local area (pairs or groups). Students may then form a sharing circle where they may share their ideas and brain storm the health issues that may have arisen for Aboriginal people before European settlement. Students may then rejoin their groups and work together to find references in the given chapters of “Playground” to the kinds of food that Aboriginal people were rationed during European settlement. Students should form a group response answering the question “How has white settlement influenced (or changed) what Aborigines eat today?” Teacher may give students guidelines for their research such as “How did the white people feel about ration food?” and “Did they continue to eat bush food?” and “What do Indigenous people eat today?” 

 

Teachers may employ various literacy strategies such as “hot seat” which The may be used as a means of assessment for stage 3 learners. Each group may elect one member to be questioned by the teacher and class in a way which allows them to present their groups findings. This in turn, may help the class gain an insight into the issue of how European settlement has affected Indigenous identity. 

 


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Difference Differently

Difference Differently | Exploring cultural influences and other factors affecting identity | Scoop.it
Helene Agamalis's insight:

Difference Differently is a resource which can be used by both students and teachers to explore the opportunities created by cultural diversity. This resource accounts for a range of factors affecting identity and allows for exploration of the subject matter through a broad range of KLA’s such as English and History. Online learning in such a manner may allow students to elucidate a wide range of information and draw upon their own beliefs and worldviews to draw upon the stimulus to explore factors affecting their own identity. The activity entitled “Part A: meaning of home” can be particularly helpful for stage 3 students in exploring cultural influences. In this activity, students explore how culture influences our idea of home through watching a series of video clips where three individuals reflect on what home means to them. Students then have the opportunity to work through the questions where they will decide what things make home special for each of the characters. Once students have formed their own answers to the questions, they may be split up into groups to explore their ideas about home and compare responses. This could also take the form of a class discussion where the students are led to realize that everyone has different ideas of what home might mean to them, which has ultimately been shaped by cultural influences. The resource also provides teachers with opportunities for assesment. For instance, at the end of each activity there is a “Finishing Activity” which provides students with the opportunity to reflect and respond to what they have learnt in the lesson. For instance, at the end of the “Meaning of Home” activity, students may create their own poem on what home means to them. This allows for students to create personal significance to the lesson which may help them to retain subject matter. 

 

 

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Pop culture in the Arab world

Pop culture in the Arab world | Exploring cultural influences and other factors affecting identity | Scoop.it
At TEDGlobal University, Shereen El Feki shows how some Arab cultures are borrowing trademarks of Western pop culture -- music videos, comics, even Barbie -- and adding a culturally appropriate twist. The hybridized media shows how two civilizations, rather than dividing, can dovetail.
Helene Agamalis's insight:

The clip: “Pop Culture in the Arab World” is a useful resource for teaching about the subject matter" cultural influences and other factors affecting identity". It provides us with a global perspective on cultural influences on the Islamic population. Shereen El Feki shows us how some Arab cultures are borrowing aspects of Western pop culture and appropriating them to better suit their cultural values. This was seen in the Arab adaptation of the Western “Barbie”. 

This resource may form the basis of an excellent sequence of activities to illustrate factors affecting identity, popular culture in particular. Stage 3 students may research Barbie dolls from around the world and how they have been appropriated to suit the country they come from. For instance, students may be given images of 30 different Barbie dolls from around the world and asked to identify which country each Barbie might come from and reasons for thinking so. This may then result in a class discussion where justification of choices could be established. The students may then highlight the similarities between Barbie dolls in various countries which may lead to a class discussion on what factors may have influenced the design of Barbie. This activity aligns with Bruner’s theory of discovery learning (1967) whereby learner’s form knowledge by forming hypotheses. Discovery learning is useful to students learning about cultural identity as they can draw upon their own personal values to develop a response to the stimulus. 

 

 

References: Bruner, J.S. (1967). On knowing: Essays for the left hand. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.

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chinateach_bk.pdf

Helene Agamalis's insight:

China Down-under is an excellent HSIE teaching resource that can be used to support teachers in their lesson planning and execution from Stage 1 through to Stage 3. This resource centers on Chinese culture in order to allow students to cultivate a broader understanding of cultural influences and factors shaping identity. The resource contains both teacher’s notes and a class set of booklets containing an exciting array of images pertaining to modern China. This can be used to reinforce students knowledge and act as a visual stimulus to facilitate a deeper understanding of culture.

An activity which may be deemed crucial for Stage 3 students in understanding cultural influences and other factors affecting identity can be seen in the activity, “Chinese Plants” (Theme 4). This activity works towards the NSW HSIE syllabus outcome “CUS3.4- Cultural Diversity”. Here, students research the production of Chinese vegetables and tea in Australia and later assess their impact on Australian dietary choices.  The resource outlines key questions that may be used as guidelines for investigating vegetables/tea such as: “How did the custom of drinking tea become a part of Australian dietary choices?” and “Where can chinese vegetables be purchased?” These questions provided by the resource are helpful in providing students with a foundation to conduct their investigation and guides them into criticially analyzing their research.  Students may use strategies such as internet research, interviews and mapping to examine the impact that Chinese tea and vegetables have had on Australian culture. This activity aligns well with assessment as the students may present their research to the class in an oral presentation (visual aids such as posters or PowerPoint presentations can also be used). This may facilitate deeper discussion amongst the class and may allow for personal reflection and comparison with other peers. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Reflections - 28 April 2001

This website aims to tackle racism in schools in Australia, through providing teachers, school students, parents and governors with games, research and lesson ideas that explore the causes and effects of racism for practical use in the classroom.
Helene Agamalis's insight:

“Racism No Way” is an online resource which contains a wide range of activities for school students where they may explore racism and other issues in depth. 

For stage 3 students, the activities on Reflections are particularly useful. Students engage with subject matter to identify ways in which education, religion and culture influence the viewpoints people have about their own identity in Australia. The mixture of visual and oral strategies implied in the resource is helpful as it generates a rich understanding of the content among students of all learning capabilities. The resource features a series of short films where people from a range of cultural backgrounds are interviewed. These short interviews provide stimulus material for discussion on the theme of the cultural influences shaping Australian identity. After students watch the video entitled “Reflections”, they are then given a stimulus worksheet entailing views expressed by a range of speakers who discuss factors which have affected their identity. Students should be split into groups where they will partake in a group discussion regarding the views expressed on the stimulus sheets. Students should then elect a spokesperson from each group who reports back to the rest of the class regarding any interesting points reached by the issues dealt with their group. This style of learning aligns with the social-constructivist approach to education which is characterized by student-centered learning. Constructivism has proven to render learning as an interpretive process which is built by the active student. This learning theory has proven to be more effective than transmission based learning in the respect that deeper conceptual understanding can be formed when students internalize knowledge based on their own experiences rather than learning based on reinforcement of an idea. Evidence which supports constructivism as a superior learning theory includes experiments conducted by Stanbridge (1990), which shows that constructivism functions effectively when students are left to their creativity to devise possible solutions. The challenge for teachers is to assume a passive role which encourages intellectual involvement and development by creating an environment where students will be inspired to express their unique ideas based on the original construct.


References: 

Stanbridge, B. (1990). A constructivist model of learning used In the teaching of junior science. The Australian Science Teachers Journal , 36(4), 20-28.

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