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Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions
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Invention v. Reinvention In The Age of Disruption

Invention v. Reinvention In The Age of Disruption | Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions | Scoop.it
janlgordon's insight:

This post was written by Andy Capaloff for Curatti about a very important topic, navigating change through the age of disruption.


Here are a few highlights:


The infusion of new ideas and the understanding of whether necessary change can be accomplished in a timely and effective manner from within and when to seek that freshness externally, are vital to the continued success of any company.


The importance of the ability to accept that something you do, whether a large or small aspect of your processes, has become a hindrance to your future growth and must be replaced, cannot be minimised.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions


Read more here: [http://bit.ly/199OAQa]

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Promoting innovation by understanding people

Promoting innovation by understanding people | Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions | Scoop.it

I selected this piece written by Jose Baldaia because  what he says here is so important because it is a mindset that companies must adopt if they want to thrive in business today.


Hi uses this quote from Marty Neumeier that really captures the essence of what he's saying.


“A company can’t will itself to be agile. Agility is an emergent property that appears when an organization has the right mindset, the right skills, and the ability to multiply those skills through collaboration. To count agility as a core competence, you have to embed it into the culture. You have to encourage an enterprise wide appetite for radical ideas. You have to keep the company in a constant state of inventiveness. It’s one thing to inject a company with inventiveness. It’s another thing to build a company on inventiveness.”


Here's an excerpt that caught my attention:


"Design thinking is, intrinsically, a prototyping process that feeds the deep understanding of what people want and enjoy (or not) about the way things are done, made, distributed, etc.


**That is, design thinking try to understand people as a whole when performing a specific activity, not just what they do, but how they feel and how it is that their needs connect to other situations in their life.


**Through design thinking, innovations do not come from incremental adjustments. They arise from the work of interdisciplinary teams of T shaped people, constantly encouraged to fail early to be able to respond to changing market conditions.


**It is essential to look beyond what is, and see what could be, using the imagination to generate entirely new solutions and identify what will drive the success of the solutions.


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/yNaoEX]

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Conscience is the Knowledge That Someone is Watching

Conscience is the Knowledge That Someone is Watching | Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions | Scoop.it

This was posted by Daniel Honen on Big Think


Very interesting series of videos on the discussion by Larry Summers of Big Think and the Nantucket Project a festival of ideas held on Nantucket, Massachusetts this month. The comments at the bottom are worth reading as well.


Intro:


The panel was stacked with financial heavyweights Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman of Google, Larry Summers, Former Treasury Secretary and President of Harvard University, Hedge Fund Manager Eddie Lampert, venture capitalist Stephen DeBerry and Mellody Hobson, President of Ariel Investments. The panel was moderated by Tom Stewart, Chief Knowledge Officer at Booz and Company


****The question of short-termism was the subject of a lively panel at  Stewart, Chief Knowledge Officer at Booz and Company. The full panel can be viewed here.


The highlights in this post bellow follow an exchange between


****Larry Summers and Eric Schmidt, in response to Tom Stewart's question about


*****whether it is difficult for a CEO to embrace the long view if he has to live and die quarter-by-quarter.


****Schmidt immediately turned this question back to the panel and audience, by posing the rhetorical question,


****"How long is the future?"


Watch Eric Schmidt here:


Curated by JanLGordon covering "Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions"


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Disrupt | Think the Unthinkable to Spark Transformation in Your Business

Disrupt | Think the Unthinkable to Spark Transformation in Your Business | Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions | Scoop.it
In a business world of nonstop change, there's only one way to win the game: transform it entirely. This requires a revolution in thinking—a steady stream of disruptive strategies and unexpected solutions. In Disrupt, Luke Williams shows exactly how to generate those strategies and deliver those solutions.

Williams shows how to combine fluid creativity with analytical rigor in a simple, complete, five-stage process for successfully disrupting any market. Using many examples and a case study, you'll walk through every step of transforming disruptive ideas from conception to breakthrough business strategy.
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How Do We Harness the Innovation Potential of our Networks?

How Do We Harness the Innovation Potential of our Networks? | Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions | Scoop.it

Venessa Miemis is a pioneer and change agent, and every one of her posts is part of a mindset that is essential for anyone who wants to thrive in this new world.  I selected this piece because it is something that I am struggling with now, perhaps you are too.  There are great insights, and suggestions on how to create relationships that are empowering and productive.


Here's an excerpt:


**we embrace the gifts, skills and capacities of the individuals in the community


**We pursue common goals and not the goals of just one or two people who come forward but find a way to let everyone be heard


Only in the past few months have I heard this term “asset mapping” as a needed tool to surface hidden but available value, bootstrap communities, and get things done.


I could go on and on but want you to read the article.


My commentary:


I personally belong to private groups on Facebook, have various affiliations on other networks and I am continually struggling with the following:


**the ability to manage time constraints,  (how can I possibly be on 10 networks, be on tweetchats at night)


** do my work which is very time consuming


**find time to eat and sleep and still have time for my wonderful life offline


**come together with these people and create something meaningful. I'm living in the question, what comes next........


I feel a responsibilty to other members to do my part and contribute in ways that I feel can help move things forward.


**As a content curator, I can bring articles like this to the attention of others


**It is my hope this will stimulate discussions


**introduce new ways of looking at things 


**create tools and resources for us to function in a more cohesive manner


**make a difference in whatever way we see fit and create dynamic, meaningful relationships both within and outside of these communities


**Work together to help others grow and change


Selected and curated by Jan Gordon covering "Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/AsGHY2]

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Questions: The Bedrock of Change and Creativity

Questions: The Bedrock of Change and Creativity | Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions | Scoop.it

This article by Polly LaBarre for Harvard Business Review is aimed at the Business Community but is really a lesson for everyone, no matter what their interest.


The gist is:


Don't enter a conversation with only answers.  The questions you ask could be the catalyst for your next or biggest leap forward. 


Questions value and empower those you are asking, and create conversation, as opposed to the boundaries which are set when people come into a conversation with only answers.


The big question referred to in the article was asked in 1999 by IBM Director Jane Harper


***In an era when every young, gifted programmer, engineer, or entrepreneur's first instinct was to write their own business plan or head to a fast-growing startup, she asked:


***"Why would really great people — the best technical and managerial talent in the world — want to come work at IBM?"


**This question spawned Extreme Blue in Cambridge, Mass., which has since grown into a thriving platform for innovation and talent acquisition.  That this type of talent would go to Big Blue, was previously unthinkable.


Curated by JanLGordon covering "Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions"


Read the article here: [http://bit.ly/tEZY8f]

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Cities Are Immortal; Companies Die

Fascinating post by John Hagel from Silicon Valley @jhagel! Great insights, food for thought...........

 

Here's an excerpt:

 

All companies die. All cities are nearly immortal.

Both are type of networks, with different destinies. There are two basic network forms: organisms or ecosystems. Companies are like organisms, while cities are like ecosystems.

 

All organisms (and companies) have share many universal laws of growth. Creatures age in the same way, whether they are small animals, large mammals, starfish, bacteria, and even cells. They share similar metabolic rates. Similar distributions. All ecosystems (and cities) also share universal laws. They evolve and scale in a similar fashion among themselves — whether they are forests, meadows, coral reefs, or grasslands, or villages.

 

Geoff West from the Santa Fe Institute has piles of data to prove these universal and predictive laws of life. For instance, organisms scale in a 3/4 law. For every doubling in size, they increase in other factors by less than one, or .75. The bigger the organism, the slower it goes. Both elephants and mice have the same number of heartbeats per lifespan, but he elephant beats slower.

 

Ecosystems and cities, on the other hand, scale by greater than one, or 1.15. Every year cities increase in wealth, crime, traffic, patents, pollution, disease, infrastructure, and per capita by 15%. The bigger the city, the faster it goes.

A less than one rate of exponential growth inevitably leads to an s-curve of stagnation. All organisms and companies eventually stagnate and die. A greater than one rate of exponential leads to a hockey stick upshot of seemingly unlimited growth. All cities keep growing. As West remarked: We can drop an atom bomb on a city and 30 years later it will be thriving.

 

http://www.kk.org/thetechnium/archives/2011/07/cities_are_immo.php

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