Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions
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Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions
People, places and things that are shaking up the status quo http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
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Scott Blake's Interactive Bar Code Portraits (PHOTOS, VIDEO)

Scott Blake's Interactive Bar Code Portraits (PHOTOS, VIDEO) | Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions | Scoop.it

The Huffington Post did an interview with Scott Blake who makes art out of barcodes. Fascinating.


Here's an excerpt:


Scott Blake makes incredible interactive portraits out of bar codes, illustrating how black-and-white data can come to resemble a personal connection. The Omaha-based artist creates convincing human expression out of symbols of commodity, depicting the strange relationship between who we are and what we consume.


HP: You've mentioned that consumerism and celebrity are linked. How does art fit in with this relationship?


SB: I am sort of interested in art as a commodity. Especially making art on the computer which to this day is considered a lesser medium. People used to joke about making art on Photoshop: "All you do is select a filter and it's done." I sort of take offense to that.


I think you can be creative on a computer. My bar code work is commenting on digital art as a commodity. It is sort of poking fun at the fact that I'm trying to sell bar codes, which are these icons for buying and selling. And I'm sort of turning that on its head. Digital art isn't one of a kind, it isn't unique... there is no original. I can make infinite copies. So in a way I am addressing this new digital way of making and consuming art.


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Exploring Change Through Ongoing Conversations"


Read full article and see video here: [http://huff.to/Jicw6n]


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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Cities Are Immortal; Companies Die

Fascinating post by John Hagel from Silicon Valley @jhagel! Great insights, food for thought...........

 

Here's an excerpt:

 

All companies die. All cities are nearly immortal.

Both are type of networks, with different destinies. There are two basic network forms: organisms or ecosystems. Companies are like organisms, while cities are like ecosystems.

 

All organisms (and companies) have share many universal laws of growth. Creatures age in the same way, whether they are small animals, large mammals, starfish, bacteria, and even cells. They share similar metabolic rates. Similar distributions. All ecosystems (and cities) also share universal laws. They evolve and scale in a similar fashion among themselves — whether they are forests, meadows, coral reefs, or grasslands, or villages.

 

Geoff West from the Santa Fe Institute has piles of data to prove these universal and predictive laws of life. For instance, organisms scale in a 3/4 law. For every doubling in size, they increase in other factors by less than one, or .75. The bigger the organism, the slower it goes. Both elephants and mice have the same number of heartbeats per lifespan, but he elephant beats slower.

 

Ecosystems and cities, on the other hand, scale by greater than one, or 1.15. Every year cities increase in wealth, crime, traffic, patents, pollution, disease, infrastructure, and per capita by 15%. The bigger the city, the faster it goes.

A less than one rate of exponential growth inevitably leads to an s-curve of stagnation. All organisms and companies eventually stagnate and die. A greater than one rate of exponential leads to a hockey stick upshot of seemingly unlimited growth. All cities keep growing. As West remarked: We can drop an atom bomb on a city and 30 years later it will be thriving.

 

http://www.kk.org/thetechnium/archives/2011/07/cities_are_immo.php

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