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Case Study: How Content Diffuses Through Different Social Networks | Social Media Today

Case Study: How Content Diffuses Through Different Social Networks | Social Media Today | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
Users behave differently on different social media platforms. When a news story breaks it moves across social media in different pulses depending on what the news is and how it travels through these platforms like Twitter, Facebook and WordPress.

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cyndi whitecotton's curator insight, April 8, 2013 12:24 PM

Because users behave differently depending on the social media platform they’re using, news travels in different pulses depending on what the news is and where it is traveling.

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How Can We Realize Health IT’s Full Potential?

How Can We Realize Health IT’s Full Potential? | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

First, let’s get right to the heart of the matter: What factors limit Health IT’s ability to support quality measurement and quality improvement?

 

My response is based on field experience in supporting hundreds of clinics and practices who are using more than 30 different Population Management(PM)/Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems.

 

I would like to tell you that we have figured out why health IT investment has not resulted in more dramatic improvements to outcomes of care, and that we have the solution – but we do not.

 

What I can share with you are three of the top challenges we have experienced in helping organizations realize the benefit of health IT adoption.

 

Limitations Within EHRs Yield Roadblocks

 

The first challenge is that of standards and interoperability. EHRs say they interoperate, but what they don’t say is at what level. Much of the data in EHRs about patients is customized, unstructured data. Even within the same EHR, templates allow a patient’s medical data (e.g., smoking status) to be stored in different locations of the database using different representations. This means that while the definition is the same, the information available is not. This lack of EHR vendor standardization and inability/unwillingness to share customized, unstructured data cripples efforts to address Meaningful Use (MU) and severely limits the analytic capability of EHR data.

 


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nrip's curator insight, April 9, 2013 1:25 AM

EHR vendors must look beyond addressing MU if the potential has to be realized. Can these EHRs be sold in a market where EHR use is not incentivized. Can these EHR's be used ina  market where the EHR use is linked to an Insurer or Employer signing the contract because of the EHR vendors name...Will the customers buy only because the EHR benefits the practice as a process optimization?

Dominique Dock's comment, April 9, 2013 4:39 AM
standardisation is clearly far from being achieved. I personally use an IT system which cannot be tweaked to my needs, and is so-called widely used...when I was working as a GP in the NHS, at least we had a large number of practices who were using the same and we had some power to obtain the changes/improvements we needed.
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A Million Smartphones Will Drive Biggest Heart Health Study in History

A Million Smartphones Will Drive Biggest Heart Health Study in History | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) are recruiting a million participants to join a decade long heart health study. The enabling factor? Smartphones. It’s a great example of information technology bleeding into other fields and speeding their progress. If all goes to plan, the UCSF study (dubbed Health eHeart) will be the broadest such study ever completed.

 

In comparison, the much lauded Framingham Heart Study, initiated in 1948, recruited and studied 15,000 participants over three generations. The Framingham study outlined today’s familiar set of heart risks that doctors use to evaluate patients and prescribe lifestyle changes—high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, smoking, obesity, diabetes, stress, and physical inactivity.

 

The discovery and subsequent mediation of these risk factors is largely credited with a 75% decline in mortality rates due to heart-related disease in the last half century. See Dr. Hans Diehl discuss how heart disease was shown to be more of a lifestyle illness than a genetic illness by World War II and the Framingham study below:

 


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Eric Topol turns Stephen Colbert around on digital health

Eric Topol turns Stephen Colbert around on digital health | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

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Andrew Spong's curator insight, April 2, 2013 10:27 AM

It’s possible that folks in the industry can be a little too quick to call out signs of the times that mobile health has “gone mainstream” or “hit the big leagues.” But there certainly have been some strong signs lately. Samsung announced mobile health features as a key part of its release strategy for the Galaxy S4. The House of Representatives hosted three days to holding hearings on mobile health regulation. And Scripps Health Chief Academic Officer and de facto digital health ambassador Eric Topol went on NBC’s Rock Center with Brian Williams to talk about digital health tools.

But now digital health has really arrived, because Topol has appeared on “The Colbert Report” to educate comedian and satirist Stephen Colbert about his book, “The Creative Destruction of Medicine”, and about the digital health space in general.

 

“Why would we want to creatively destroy medicine?” Colbert asked at the start of the interview. “Medicine is keeping us alive! Leave it alone.”

 

Topol explained that the appeal of digital health lies in highly personalized medicine, delivered via the smartphone.

 

“Well, you know what is going to be different is that smartphone is going to be a conduit of data and information about your health, about your medical essence, like you never had before,” he said.

 

Making the most of the brief interview, Topol demonstrated some of his standby mobile health technologies: the AliveCor ECG heart monitor and the ViSi Mobile Monitor from Sotera Wireless. Taking a cue from a tweet in which Colbert had complained of a ruptured ear drum, Topol produced a CellScope smartphone-enabled otoscope, and showed Colbert’s fans the inside of his ear, eliciting cheers from the Colbert Nation.

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Twitter community #BCSM expands online to broaden patient engagement

Twitter community #BCSM expands online to broaden patient engagement | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Last week, the ongoing twitter conversation under the hashtag #BCSM officially expanded online in support of the global breast cancer community.

 

The new website is here: http://www.bcsmcommunity.org – and there’s a companion YouTube Channel here.

 

The hashtag itself stands for Breast Cancer Social Media – and the first online community “chat” using the #BCSM hashtag was on July 4th, 2011. Websites aren’t normally all that newsworthy anymore, but the evolution here most definitely is.

 

The more traditional trajectory, of course, is to start with a website and then add a “twitter handle” as a way to expand an audience or community reach. Among the many amazing powers of twitter, it seems, is the ability to reverse that model. At least that’s been the trajectory for #BCSM.


Via Andrew Spong, Dominique Godefroy, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Andrew Spong's curator insight, April 3, 2013 8:12 AM

This is great :)

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Design principles for pharma digital strategy | pharmaphorum

Design principles for pharma digital strategy | pharmaphorum | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
This article is about parallels between design principles and the strategic challenges for pharma digital strategy.

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crossroads of technology and liberal arts

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100 trends that will change healthcare in 2013 - Founder's Blog - Healthy Startups

100 trends that will change healthcare in 2013 - Founder's Blog - Healthy Startups | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
Jason Berek-Lewis Founder, Healthy Startups

___________________________________________________...

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RFID-reading wristband tracks hand hygiene to reduce hospital-acquired infections

RFID-reading wristband tracks hand hygiene to reduce hospital-acquired infections | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

A startup called IntelligentM wants to make hospitals healthier by encouraging workers to clean their hands properly. Its solution is an RFID (radio frequency identification) bracelet that vibrates when the wearer has scrubbed sufficiently, giving employees a way to check their habits and letting employers know who is and isn’t doing things right.

 

Some 100,000 people a year in the United States alone die because of infections that arise from hospital visits, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and a lot of these infections occur because doctors, nurses, and technicians don’t wash well enough.


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Rehabmyheart's comment, March 26, 2013 12:50 PM
Washing hands is good and this would be useful to get staff trained. It only addresses a small portion of infection control how about lab coats. I know many who will wear the same lab coat for months without washing. Another issue is equipment such as ekg leads, how often are these thoroughly wiped clean between patients. In outpatient rehabs patients are trained to clean their equipment, but do you trust the patient has properly cleaned the equipment before you?
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Social Media 2013 User Demographics – infographic /@BerriePelser

Social Media 2013 User Demographics – infographic /@BerriePelser | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
Social Media 2013: User Demographics For Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest And Instagram – INFOGRAPHIC Those good

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WordPress SEO & Social Media's curator insight, March 20, 2013 6:06 AM

Social Media 2013 User Demographics – infographic /@BerriePelser

Mercor's curator insight, March 20, 2013 7:40 AM

Rescooped by Gerrit Bes from WordPress Google SEO and Social Media onto Latest Social Media News

Art Jones's curator insight, March 21, 2013 12:27 PM

Since social media is more about PEOPLE than TECHNOLOGY this infographic with it's demographic bhreakdown of who uses which platforms provides interesting perspective.

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The Rare Disease Search Engine That Outperforms Google

A powerful new search engine designed to help diagnose rare diseases could prove a boon for both medics and the public

 

In the late 1940s, a professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine coined an unusual phrase to describe unexpected diagnoses. “When you hear hoofbeats behind you, don’t expect to see a zebra,” he said. The phrase stuck and today, medics commonly use the term “zebra” to describe a rare disease, usually defined as one that occurs in less than 1 in 2000 of the population. 

 

Rare diseases are inherently hard to diagnose. According to the European Organisation for Rare Disease, 25 per cent of diagnoses are delayed by between 5 and 30 years.

 

So it’s no surprise that medics are looking for more effective ways to do the job. An increasingly common aid in this process is the search engine, typically Google.  This forms part of an iterative process in which a medic enter symptoms into a search engine, examines lists of potential diseases and then looks for further evidence of symptoms in the patient.

 


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Seth Cooper, Foldit - GSummit 2012 Gamification Expert Interview

Seth Cooper, co-creator of Foldit talks about games for science...


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Social media changes how patients pick hospitals

Social media changes how patients pick hospitals | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
More than 40 percent of patients say social media impacts their hospital choice.

 

Patients might not depend on social media for their health status or actual health care, but when it comes to choosing a hospital, chances are good that social media may come into play.

 

A new study indicates that 41 percent of patients report that social media impacts their choice of hospital. Read that again and let it sink in. That’s right–their choice of hospital can be influenced by social media—your social media.

 

If your hospital is not using social media and your competition is, guess where nearly half of your potential patients may end up going?

 

Looking at social media in this light gives a whole new meaning to “return on investment.” We all know that a hospital needs to be running near capacity to remain financially viable. If your hospital is losing a portion of your patient population to another hospital because they increased their awareness and built some brand loyalty through social media, your hospital may be feeling it in the bottom line.


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Dialysis Patient Organizations Form Groundbreaking Partnership to Empower ... - PR Newswire (press release)

Dialysis Patient Organizations Form Groundbreaking Partnership to Empower ...
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Harnessing the power of social media to improve pharma's image ...

Harnessing the power of social media to improve pharma's image ... | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Christie Shilling. Cutting Edge Information. In our digital focus month, Christie Shilling takes a look at the power of social media and how it could be used to improve pharma's image. Pharma's inroads and social media's ...


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Why Brands Are Already Looking at Google Glass and Why Apple Should Be Worried

Why Brands Are Already Looking at Google Glass and Why Apple Should Be Worried | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
Experts predict product could kill smartphones, alter marketing landscape for years to come

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Neil Wilkins's curator insight, February 22, 2013 7:03 AM

The new Google touchscreen laptop has software, apps and content held in the cloud... Cloud Marketing... in case you doubted that it's coming...

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Sanofi lance une étude d'envergure en télédiabétologie - Mars 2013 - Pharmaceutiques

Sanofi lance une étude d'envergure en télédiabétologie - Mars 2013 - Pharmaceutiques | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
Sanofi donne le coup d'envoi de son étude Télésage qui devrait valider l'intérêt médical et l'impact médico-économique de Diabeo®, une solution permettant aux diabétiques de calculer leurs doses d'insulines en temps réel et d'ajuster leur traitement.

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Five Essential Moves to Transform Healthcare Marketing | HealthWorks Collective

Five Essential Moves to Transform Healthcare Marketing | HealthWorks Collective | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
Holding on to a narrow view of healthcare marketing as simply promotions sub-optimizes marketing performance and wastes marketing investments.

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When Email Is Part of Treatment

When Email Is Part of Treatment | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
Patients love it. Physicians find it often saves them time and money. So why aren't more doctors burning up the email lines with their patients?

 

The questions come at all hours, popping up on Dr. Mark Seigel's personal email account: Can I dye my hair? Is it safe to drink red raspberry leaf tea? When will the nausea stop?

 

Dr. Seigel, an OB-GYN with offices in the Maryland suburbs of Washington, D.C., answers them all.

 

"There are some patients, who are kind of like frequent fliers," he said. "I might get 20 emails from the same person. I know…they have fears and I'm mindful of that."

 

Most doctors don't agree with Dr. Seigel's approach. As the rest of the world has raced ahead with instant communication, medicine still lags far behind. Just under one-third of doctors reported emailing with patients in 2012, up from 27% five years earlier, according to annual studies of more than 3,000 doctors conducted by Manhattan Research, a health-care market-research firm. Those texting rose from 12% in 2010 to 18% in 2012.


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Could Video Games Be Used To Improve Youth Health?

Could Video Games Be Used To Improve Youth Health? | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

A new study led by researchers at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS) suggests that certain games could provide an attractive energy-burning P.E. alternative option for kids.


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Rescooped by David Dellamonica from 2- HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK
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Social Media

Social Media | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
Infographic-How-Are-Consumers-Using-Social-Media-for-Health (#Infographic on How Are Consumers Using Social Media for Health - http://t.co/pMQlbuPKyk)...

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Henri-Damien Laurent's curator insight, March 25, 2013 4:49 AM

Une infographie sur l'impact des réseaux sociaux sur les pratiques de santé publique.

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Scientists have developed a tiny, portable personal blood testing laboratory that sends data through mobile phone

Scientists have developed a tiny, portable personal blood testing laboratory that sends data through mobile phone | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Humans are veritable chemical factories—we manufacture thousands of substances and transport them, via our blood, throughout our bodies. Some of these substances can be used as indicators of our health status. A team of EPFL scientists has developed a tiny device that can analyze the concentration of these substances in the blood.

 

Implanted just beneath the skin, it can detect up to five proteins and organic acids simultaneously, and then transmit the results directly to a doctor's computer. This method will allow a much more personalized level of care than traditional blood tests can provide. Health care providers will be better able to monitor patients, particularly those with chronic illness or those undergoing chemotherapy. The prototype, still in the experimental stages, has demonstrated that it can reliably detect several commonly traced substances. 



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Jackson Ford's comment, March 21, 2013 11:17 PM
A perfect example of how the use of Information Technology is revolutionizing the medical field. This comes in the form of a robotic chip that observes micro and macro nutrient ratios in order to observe current health.
Jackson Ford's comment, March 22, 2013 12:50 AM
Not only will this save lives, but it will save time as it could potentially diagnose or predict upcoming health problems before they become an extreme issue. Furthermore, for those who are too 'proud' for regular medical health checkups, this will remove the embarrassment those individuals percieve in regular health checkups at the hospital.
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e-Patient Dave Explains What An e-Patient Is! - Kathie Melocco

e-Patient Dave Explains What An e-Patient Is! - Kathie Melocco | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
e-Patient Dave explains what an e-Patient is: Emerging e-patient activities: 47% of adults have used the internet to get information about doctors or other health professionals 41% have read someone else's commentary or ...

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Era of mobile health tracking definitively arrives, Samsung Galaxy S4 & accessories focuses on mHealth

Era of mobile health tracking definitively arrives, Samsung Galaxy S4 & accessories focuses on mHealth | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
When a company that had over $180 billion in net revenue (more than Apple) for 2012 decides to seriously get into mobile health devices, it's safe to say the age of mobile tracking has definitely arrived.

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OMP Digital's curator insight, March 15, 2013 8:02 AM

Samsung’s S Health app is a native app the phone comes with the Samsung Galaxy 4 enabling you to input the calories you consume in a day and a slew of other fitness metrics.

 

As Samsung made over $180 billion in net revenue (more than Apple) for 2012 they have decided to seriously get into mobile health devices, with this it’s safe to say the age of mobile tracking to the consumer has definitely arrived.

Ines Di Loreto's curator insight, March 19, 2013 4:41 AM

The first mobile with built in health applications

Sven Awege's curator insight, March 20, 2013 5:37 AM

Come on Apple or Microsoft, show us what you've got!

My guess is MS's HealthVault will be packaged into MS solutions within the next year - they have been soft-launching the service again, even in tough markets such as France.

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Apple's iWatch Will Measure More than Time

Apple's iWatch Will Measure More than Time | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

At first glance it appears to be not much more than eclectic mix of items from various brands that feed the Apple ecosystem. But there's an underlying coherence to the display. Most items are so-called "wearable technologies." Here's a quick sample:

 

#3.Fitbit One and Zip physical activity sensors
#6.Scosche Rhythm heart rate monitor armband
#7.Jawbone Up physical activity and sleep sensor
#12.Nike+ Fuelband physical activity sensor
#18.Lark Life physical activity and sleep sensor
#19.iBGStar blood glucose sensor
#20.iHealth wireless blood pressure wrist monitor

 

Unlike other wearable technologies like, say, headphones, these devices allow you to monitor and analyze sleep, health, and fitness levels. In short, your well being.


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I love these insights.
Any idea for a prescription and reimbursement in the future?!!

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What is mHealth? Is it Mobile health or Modern health?

What is mHealth? Is it Mobile health or Modern health? | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Syllogism causes confusion among healthcare terms such as modern health, mobile health, digital health, ehealth, mhealth, telemedicine, and telehealth.

 

Clearly, Lions & Tigers are both cats, and cats are animals, but the healthcare syllogisms aren’t as straight forward. People often associate Mobile Health with the ambulance that shows up to provide care and transportation, rather than the use of mobile devices and wireless networks. They may also associate Mobile Health with the tablet device the doctor uses as she moves about, rather than a smartphone device. That’s why I drew the diagram with mHealth not entirely within Wireless Health or within Telehealth. And it’s why I added a new term to  encompass them all - Modern Health.

 

I apologize to my consumer audience if this article sometimes gets a bit technical. That’s because it was partially written to address a technical audience. You can skip the technology, go straight to the Cool mHealth Trends.

 

mHealth & Telehealth

 

Telehealth is the delivery of health-related services and information via telecommunications technologies. These services could be as simple as two health professionals discussing a case over the telephone, a video call between patient and practitioner(s), or doing robotic surgery between facilities at different ends of the globe. Telehealth is an expansion of telemedicine, because it’s not limited to clinical treatment but can also apply to prevention. Likewise,telehealth is an expansion of mHealth, because it’s not limited to cellular technologies.

 

mHealth & Wireless Health

 

Wireless health differs from mHealth in that wireless health solutions will not always be mobile and mobile health solutions will not always be wirelessly enabled. Wireless Health integrates wireless technology into traditional medicine, such as for diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of illness. Wireless technologies eliminate the cost and effort to install wires and support the ability to move about without being tethered. Wireless networks can cover very short distances such as between wearable sensors and a smartphone, entire buildings such as Wi-Fi home networks; or wider areas such as cellular networks that extend from tower to tower. These mobile broadband networks are especially useful in reaching new patients in remote areas than previously possible.

 

mHealth & eHealth

 

eHealth describes any healthcare practice supported by electronic information processing and communication, so it has broader reach than mHealth, which relates to practices using mobile  (phone or computing) technologies

 

mHealth: Mobile Health or Modern Health?

 

Many app developers view mHealth as exploiting mobile telecommunication in health care delivery. That can include mobile phones (voice & SMS text), smartphones, or a variety of other devices that include laptop computers, patient monitoring devices, MP3 players, PERS systems, and more.  The term can extend to both mobile and stationary devices, as long as they used mobile/cellular telecom technologies, but what if they don’t communicate at all?

 

What if a smartphone app uses sensors to collect health & fitness data and then stores and tracks it on the device itself without ever sending it anywhere? If the device itself is viewed as a telecom device, it might fit in the mHealthcategory, but the iPod Touch has no mobile phone connection, and even though it uses the same iPhone technology, it arguably would not fit the mHealth definition, even though it’s running the exact same code. That’s where the traditional mHealth definition breaks down, and it’s one reason that I prefer to extend mHealth to Modern Health, rather than just Mobile Health.

Modern Health encompasses innovations that collectively define the future of healthcare. They include: digital, electronic & mobile health, telehealth & telemedicine, electronic sensors & cloud-based monitoring services, video calls & telepresence, electronic medical & personal health records, big data & analytics, healthcare robotics & artificial intelligence, personalized medicine & genomics, and the wireless connections (ANT+, Bluetooth LE, ZigBee, Z-Wave, Wi-Fi, 4G, LTE), big broadband networks (fiber-optics), and regulatory & payment reforms that bind them.

 

Yes, nearly 40,000 health-related apps are available today for smartphones, and that number is up ten-fold from about 4,000 in 2010. So clearly smartphone availability and fast Internet access are driving much of the growth of modern healthcare applications, but don’t discount large mHealth opportunities on other devices and in other geographic markets.


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