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Gamifying your health with Google Glass: a glimpse into the future

Gamifying your health with Google Glass: a glimpse into the future | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
Google Glass has the potential to fundamentally change the way we track and gamify health.

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Gail Worthington-Eyre's curator insight, May 5, 2013 8:29 PM

Google Gass has the power to change the way we live our lives and make it fun. 

Charity WIlls's curator insight, May 25, 2013 12:58 AM

Gamifying your health with Google Glass: a glimpse into the future

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Some Digital and Social Media Guidance – FDA Regulation of Pharma Communications in a Digital Era – A White Paper | Eye on FDA

Some Digital and Social Media Guidance – FDA Regulation of Pharma Communications in a Digital Era – A White Paper | Eye on FDA | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

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Smart Prescription Drug Bottle Polices Painkiller Usage to Curb Abuse

Smart Prescription Drug Bottle Polices Painkiller Usage to Curb Abuse | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Sometimes, too much of a substance that's supposed to help can cause serious harm.

 

Drug overdose death rates in the United States have more than tripled since 1990, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Just in 2008, for example, the CDC says there were 14,800 deaths in the U.S. caused by prescription painkillers.

 

Considering this problem, a group of Brigham Young University (BYU) students reimagined the prescription drug bottle and have developed a high-tech regulator.

 

Their invention, called Med Vault, basically lets a pharmacist give instructions to the bottle, which then dispenses painkillers accordingly to the patient. Via a USB connection, a pharmacist can use special software to load the pills and program how many can be dispensed per day.

 

"They can dispense one pill every four hours or two pills every 24 hours or whatever the doctor prescribes," said BYU senior Madison Clark, the team's electrical engineer.

 

 

It's a pretty complex design that the team claims is tamper-resistant and break-resistant. The Med Vault requires users to put in an access code to get a pill, making it harder for the drugs to get into the wrong hands (e.g., a small child).

 

"The physical requirements of the shell and of the material properties are such that you can't take a hammer to it and break it open," Clark told Mashable.


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Mhealth still needs work before it's practical in clinical environment

Mhealth still needs work before it's practical in clinical environment | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Panelists from a hospital forum have agreed that there is still progress needed before the devices can be integrated.

According to a panel at the Hospital Cloud Forum from the Information Management Network last week, doctors still need to be able to find a way to integrate mhealth and the data available through those systems into clinical care.

The devices that would be used would be connected to the cloud and would bring physicians and patient data together.

Mhealth could provide a very important way to bring the data regarding a patient’s current health and medical history to the fingertips of a doctor, according to the Maimonides Medical Center senior vice president and chief medical informatics officer, Dr. Steven J. Davidson, from Brooklyn, New York. He said that “I’d like to offer a vision as a longtime clinician that has talked to lots of patients over the years that the cloud is where patients and physicians are going to meet.”

Many panel members saw the value of giving doctors access to virtualized services through mhealth technology.

According to senior information and communications technology strategist and architect at Intel, Matthew Taylor, giving physicians direct access to mhealth services by way of mobile devices would give the entire healthcare industry a way to shrink the number of readmissions, and avoid unnecessary admissions from the very start.

 


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Building a Better App

Building a Better App | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Consumer health IT can dramatically impact patient care by facilitating such vital functions as medication management, remote patient monitoring, and tighter communication between patients and their care providers. The guide is particularly timely because in the next few years, health care providers will focus as never before on electronic linkages with their patients. Many hospitals and health systems have patient portals on the Internet, with access to rudimentary health record information, and perhaps the ability to e-mail physicians. Some offer mobile versions of those portals. But providers have so far been under no outside pressure to get patients to use those resources.

 

Patient-oriented health IT is officially on the national agenda through the federal “meaningful use” program, which gives billions in cash incentives to providers for using IT to improve care (and in 2015 is scheduled to start penalizing holdouts by reducing their Medicare payments). The most recent set of criteria for meaningful use, to be phased in starting in 2014, requires an active effort to link patients into the information loop. Not only do providers have to make patients’ information available to them online, they also have to show that at least 5% of the patients have accessed that information in a given year. That percentage is likely to increase with the next round of meaningful use requirements.


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5 Data-Driven Ideas To Combat Diabetes

5 Data-Driven Ideas To Combat Diabetes | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
No matter how much technology we throw at it, the diabetes epidemic just won’t budge. Today, 8.3% of the U.S. population has the disease--a problem that cost the country $245 billion in 2012 alone.

 

For the past few years, drugmaker Sanofi US has run the $100,000 Data Design Diabeteschallenge, a call for entrants to design data-driven diabetes solutions. This isn’t a challenge for flash in the pan ideas that disappear soon after winning. Past competitions have yielded successful initiatives like Ginger.io, a behavioral health analytics startup that recently raised $6.5 million.

 

The finalists for this year’s competition (theme: using open data to make the right diabetes decisions at the right time) are below.

GOCAP

The GoCap is perhaps the simplest concept of the bunch: it’s a high-tech replacement cap for pre-filled insulin pens that can read dose amounts and time, and then wirelessly communicate that information to cell phones and glucometers. The resulting data can be used by both patients and large organizations for analysis.

CONNECT & COACH TM

A product of software development firm PHRQL, Connect & Coach TM calls itself the first clinical and consumer application to let dietitians and diabetes educators perform Diabetes Self-Management Education and Medical Nutrition Therapy in local communities. The product is designed for supermarket and pharmacy use.

ALLAZOENGINE

Created by healthcare analytics company Allazo Health, the AllazoEngine attempts to solve the niggling problem of medication non-adherence by using existing data from its members to predict who will neglect to take their pills--and the best way to get them back on track.

NUDURO

Like many products breaking into the market today, Nuduro provides healthy meal recommendations that match customer lifestyle, taste, and nutritional requirements. Unlike the other products out there, however, Nuduro presumably focuses specifically on diabetes patients.

MEDISAPIEN DIABETIC CLINICAL DATA REPOSITORY

This product, created by ZyDoc, is an enterprise healthcare analytics platform that lets users deposit all sorts of unstructured data--dictation, legacy data, transcribed text, and more--and transforms it all into fully-coded structured data. The platform is obviously relevant outside of the diabetes world as well.


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Data Analytics's curator insight, May 9, 2013 12:04 AM

Analytics Companies in the Clinical Space. Interesting concepts from innovative companies.

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Wikipedia and other sites owned by the Wikimedia Foundation now get 500m unique visitors each month

Wikipedia and other sites owned by the Wikimedia Foundation now get 500m unique visitors each month | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
More than 500 million unique visitors now access Wikipedia and other websites owned by the Wikimedia Foundation, including Wikibooks, Wikidata and Wikimedia Commons, on a monthly basis.

Data ...

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Video Games Help Treat Kids With Chronic Pain

Video Games Help Treat Kids With Chronic Pain | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
The Children’s National Medical Center opened a new pain care complex with video games to monitor children and change treatment in real time.

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Is mobile health approaching its iPhone moment?

Is mobile health approaching its iPhone moment? | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Mobile technology is experiencing a surge of advances in relation to the medical industry.

 

Technological advances once merely imagined in Sci-Fi flicks (think of Star Trek’s communicator, Bluetooth technologies, and even a quasi version of touch enabled computer screens) are being realized and even superseded thanks to modern innovation.

 

Mobile technology, in particular, is experiencing a surge of advances in relation to the medical industry. Research breakthroughs, advances in supporting technology infrastructure, and even substantial allocations of resources from private investors are realizing far reaching technological dreams, and then some.

 

Several weeks ago, Mike Lazaridis’ Research In Motion’s Blackberry Vice Chairman, (the maker of those once ubiquitous handheld wireless devices), launched a $97 million dollar Quantum Valley Investments fund to support innovation and entrepreneurs focused on creating non-invasive medical diagnostic equipment. The idea is simply to make “Star Trek’s” medical tricorder device for diagnosis a reality.

 

The push to go mobile has been years in the making and has, in many respects, been assisted by underlying communications technology and the utilization of what many in Silicon Valley have termed the social, mobile, web trifecta. Smartphones, applications, and social media have helped to drive mobile advancements in relation to consumer technology adoption, and impactful breakthroughs in medical technologies have been evolving as well.


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Rescooped by David Dellamonica from GAMIFICATION & SERIOUS GAMES IN HEALTH by PHARMAGEEK
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Top 10 Gamification Apps

Top 10 Gamification Apps | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

The 10 best apps to turn each part of your work and mundane chores into fun games filled with points and rewards. (A2v2 #prodchat and if all else fails, install one of those gamified apps on your smartphone & earn badges for chores!


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Using Your Personal DNA Test - 23andMe

Using Your Personal DNA Test - 23andMe | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
We provide genetic testing for over 100 traits and diseases as well as DNA ancestry. Order your kit from 23andMe, submit your sample to our CLIA-certified lab and read your results on your secure web-based account.

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Ginny Dillon's curator insight, April 10, 2013 11:35 AM
Amazing Service!Our Technology and Standards

23andMe is a DNA analysis service providing information and tools for individuals to learn about and explore their DNA. We use the Illumina OmniExpress Plus Genotyping BeadChip (shown here). In addition to the variants already included on the chip by Illumina, we've included our own, customized set of variants relating to conditions and traits that are interesting. Technical information on the performance of the chip can be found on Illumina's website.

 

All of the laboratory testing for 23andMe is done in a CLIA-certified laboratory.

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Neurology in Social Media

Neurology in Social Media | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
Neurology and Web 2.0. Collection of neurology related blogs, podcasts, slideshows, mobile applications and community sites to help you keep yourself up-to-date.

Via Pharmacomptoir / Corinne Thuderoz, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Why digital health is no 'bubble'

Why digital health is no 'bubble' | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
Some say digital health investing is flailing, but it might just be getting started.

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UK NHS launches 12 patient decision support apps

UK NHS launches 12 patient decision support apps | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
The UK NHS has launched a series of patient decision support apps for a range of common diseases to help improve patient education and understanding

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eMedToday's curator insight, May 5, 2013 5:22 PM

This is an interesting touch point for doctor/patient relationship which does impact Pharma's. Brilliant idea.

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Remote Patient Monitoring will Lead Value-Based Healthcare | The ...

Remote Patient Monitoring will Lead Value-Based Healthcare | The ... | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Traditional health insurance reimbursement to providers (though payment is a more appropriate word) for healthcare services and products is at the root of our healthcare crisis.  Our traditional fee for service system in the USA rewards hospitals and providers for doing more (and more costly) procedures to patients. Some interesting findings from a study from Harvard Medical School  were that the higher the cost of surgery, the greater the likelihood of complications and the more out-of-pocket a patient with Medicare or private insurance paid, the more complications were reported. In addition, if a patient paid for the surgery fully out-of-pocket or through government-funded Medicaid, the likelihood of complications was lower. The Affordable Care Act, which introduces newer payment models including bundled payments, is creating an economic environment which is conducive to the widespread use of remote patient monitoring (RPM) for recently discharged hospital patients and those with chronic diseases. RPM will be most focused on vital signs monitoring for cardiac and pulmonary patients and diabetes monitoring.  Larger opportunities abound for weight management, medication adherence, and preventive medicine.

Recent institution of Medicare payment penalties for hospital readmissions is probably the most immediate impetus for the interest by healthcare systems in RPM. Studies at Johns Hopkins University and Geisinger Medical Center are just a few which demonstrate this utility of RPM.

RPM, will, in addition, foster other offshoot benefits of its technology. Firstly, I believe it will accelerate interoperability of disparate digital monitoring technologies, EHRs and patient portals. The ability of different technologies to talk to each other and to EHRs is at the heart of potential benefits of electronic health data.  Secondly, it will change the culture of healthcare to shift the focus from the provider to the patient. Data emanating from patients will de facto involve patients more than they are now in their own care. Seeing the data will educate them and facilitate self-management (to detractors of the concept of self-management, patients have been self-managing diabetes for decades). RPM will increase interest in (and hopefully use of) patient portals which will be mobile hubs of patient health records and communication. But I digress (something I usually don’t do, but RPM has so many ramifications).  This will also herald an introduction into the use of mobile apps by patients, recommended by providers. The issue surrounding reimbursement for health apps in general will also be resolved as it follows the path of RPM.

Organizations adopting RPM now are those who already have value-based or bundled payment systems or who realize that determining the ROI of technology in healthcare can be complex and that the predictable prevention of penalties is a good starting place. Improving longer term outcomes of RPM certainly needs more study.

While RPM is not new, its place as a leader of technology in the new payment system healthcare space is. RPM is well-suited for bundled payment systems because it is not just a technology. It involves the creation of processes and changes in workflow around the technology, some of which are home-based and some office and hospital-based. The success of RPM depends upon physician champions who will design these processes, and devise alert self-management, provider notification and treatment algorithms. RPM, via technology, can be the door to better provider-patient communication, more meaningful office follow-up visits, and increased caregiver participation.  Nothing I’ve said here is earth shattering news. I meant to bring the discussion of RPM to a practical level about why it is here, needs to be utilized now and where it fits in to existing strategies. Let’s all welcome it.

 

 


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Changes are afoot for clinical and business intelligence

Changes are afoot for clinical and business intelligence | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Researchers found that patients saw physicians who use CDS as somehow less capable than those who don't. They saw the IT tools as impersonal, and thought the systems were a barrier between them and their caregivers.

 

That's the wrong way to think about it, says John Hoyt, executive vice president, HIMSS Analytics.

 

"They just need to understand it's not taking the place of their physician," he says. "It's an aid and reminder of the latest peer-reviewed advice and best practice alerts, etc."

 

It can "touchy," says Hoyt, because it may suggest, "subconsciously, that your physician is flawed, that he has a human brain – that may be a shock to some people."

 

But far from being a cheat, or a crutch to be leaned upon, decision support is an essential tool in the clinician's arsenal. Especially nowadays.

 

"Things get complex," he says. "A good physician will go out and search the literature. In days of old, they used to spend time in the medical library. But now we can bring it to their faces, at the moment."

 

But there's a fine line between that and "in your face," as it were.

Designing CDS to supply relevant information – at the right time and place – without risking physician alert fatigue, "is an art," said Hoyt. "We don't want to remind the physician, 'Hey, we've got a patient with high cholesterol, order a lipid test.' For God's sake, they know that."

 

It's even worse in the pharmacy: "Every minute, today, in these hospitals, the pharmacists are getting alerts that are far more detailed and hypnotic than the physicians get."

 

But clinical and business intelligence technology is changing, evolving – and getting smarter.

 


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New device could make diagnosing disease as simple as breathing

New device could make diagnosing disease as simple as breathing | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

A range of diseases and conditions, from asthma to liver disease, could be diagnosed and monitored quickly and painlessly just by breathing, using gas sensing technology developed by a Cambridge spin-out.

 

The highly sensitive, low-power, low-cost infrared emitter developed by Cambridge CMOS Sensors (CCMOSS) is capable of identifying more than 35 biomarkers present in exhaled breath in concentrations as low as one part per million, and is being developed for use as a non-invasive medical testing device and other applications.

 

In addition to nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide, we exhale thousands of chemical compounds with every breath: elevated acetone levels in the breath can indicate poorly-controlled diabetes, asthmatics will exhale higher than normal levels of nitric oxide, and glucose is a sign of kidney failure.



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PatientsLikeMe launches clinical trial search tool for patients - PMLiVE

PatientsLikeMe launches clinical trial search tool for patients - PMLiVE | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

"PatientsLikeMe launches clinical trial search tool for patients http://t.co/3CnTcEIf77 via @pmlivecom" Could be very useful for #pharma.


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Socializing Pharma – Sanofi Gets it Right

Socializing Pharma – Sanofi Gets it Right | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Today’s patients are empowered and connected – living as much in the digital world as the “real” world. It isn’t easy to engage healthcare customers in soci...


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eMedToday's comment, April 18, 2013 8:24 PM
Interesting example of getting it right. The key is patient engagement around a target disease or problem
Scott Chepow's comment, April 19, 2013 6:12 AM
Wonder how they monitor the reaction...
Sven Awege's comment, April 20, 2013 2:41 AM
They are building great insights too along the way through listening to the community. That will certainly be fed through into the more traditional marketing material ;-)
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Kinsa launches a smartphone-connected thermometer to create a real-time health map

Kinsa launches a smartphone-connected thermometer to create a real-time health map | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
New York-based Kinsa is trying to create a real-time picture of the country’s health with a smartphone and a simplified digital thermometer.

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A pill that sends a text on entering a patient's stomach

A pill that sends a text on entering a patient's stomach | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Proteus Digital Health has developed a pill that can text an alert when it enters a patient’s stomach.

 

The technology, widely tested and already available for over-the-counter sale in a pilot program in the UK is just one of several new developments in caregiving technology designed to prevent hospital readmissions and relieve family caregivers of the persistent worry: “Is Dad taking his meds?”


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digeratus's curator insight, April 17, 2013 1:47 AM

Thanks to Andrew Spong for spotting this.

Marie Ennis-O'Connor's comment, April 17, 2013 6:40 AM
Very interesting
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How some physicians create apps for their patients

How some physicians create apps for their patients | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

A British-Australian company has entered the US market with a low-cost template for individual physicians, dentists, orthodontists and small practices to customize mobile apps.

 

The company, Lexington Creative, which has built an app for people with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder called ADHD Organizer and notably has designed a mobile app for Dick’s Sporting Goods in the US, last month had a soft launch internationally of Apps for Doctors, according to Alex Harrington, Australia-based head of client relations.


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Using Your Personal DNA Test - 23andMe

Using Your Personal DNA Test - 23andMe | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
We provide genetic testing for over 100 traits and diseases as well as DNA ancestry. Order your kit from 23andMe, submit your sample to our CLIA-certified lab and read your results on your secure web-based account.

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Ginny Dillon's curator insight, April 10, 2013 11:35 AM
Amazing Service!Our Technology and Standards

23andMe is a DNA analysis service providing information and tools for individuals to learn about and explore their DNA. We use the Illumina OmniExpress Plus Genotyping BeadChip (shown here). In addition to the variants already included on the chip by Illumina, we've included our own, customized set of variants relating to conditions and traits that are interesting. Technical information on the performance of the chip can be found on Illumina's website.

 

All of the laboratory testing for 23andMe is done in a CLIA-certified laboratory.

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Feasibility of a Wiki as a Participatory Tool for Patients in Clinical Guideline Development

Feasibility of a Wiki as a Participatory Tool for Patients in Clinical Guideline Development | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Patient participation is essential in developing high-quality guidelines but faces practical challenges. Evidence on timing, methods, evaluations, and outcomes of methodologies for patient participation in guideline development is lacking.

 

Objective: To assess the feasibility of a wiki as a participatory tool for patients in the development of a guideline on infertility determined by (1) use of the wiki (number of page views and visitors), (2) benefits of the wiki (ie, number, content, and eligibility of the recommendations to be integrated into the guideline), and (3) patients’ facilitators of and barriers to adoption, and the potential challenges to be overcome in improving this wiki.

 

Results: The wiki attracted 298 unique visitors, yielding 289 recommendations. We assessed the 21 recommendations ranked as the top 5 or top 3 for their eligibility for being integrated into the clinical practice guideline. The evaluation identified some challenges needed to be met to improve the wiki tool, concerning its ease of use, website content and layout, and characteristics of the wiki tool.


Conclusions: The wiki is a promising and feasible participatory tool for patients in guideline development. A modified version of this tool including new modalities (eg, automatically limiting the number and length of recommendations, using a fixed format for recommendations, including a motivation page, and adding a continuous prioritization system) should be developed and evaluated in a patient-centered design.

 


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Dr. Luis Ramos Neira's curator insight, April 16, 2013 7:49 AM

Wikifiquemos, que algo queda

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The Business Case for People Powered Health - Nesta

The Business Case for People Powered Health - Nesta | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
Nesta promotes innovation in the UK. We help people and organisations bring great ideas to life by providing investments and grants and mobilising research, networks and skills.

Via Dan Baxter, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Dan Baxter's curator insight, April 16, 2013 4:41 AM

eople powered health. What resource is the most under utilised in healthcare? The PATIENT!