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Rescooped by David Dellamonica from Heart and Vascular Health
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Western Diet lowers odds of "ideal aging"

Western Diet lowers odds of "ideal aging" | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

Background

The impact of diet on specific age-related diseases has been studied extensively, but few investigations have adopted a more holistic approach to determine the association of diet with overall health at older ages. We examined whether diet, assessed in midlife, using dietary patterns and adherence to the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), is associated with aging phenotypes, identified after a mean 16-year follow-up.

Methods

Data were drawn from the Whitehall II cohort study of 5350 adults (age 51.3±5.3 years, 29.4% women). Diet was assessed at baseline (1991-1993). Mortality, chronic diseases, and functioning were ascertained from hospital data, register linkage, and screenings every 5 years and were used to create 5 outcomes at follow-up: ideal aging (free of chronic conditions and high performance in physical, mental, and cognitive functioning tests; 4%), nonfatal cardiovascular event (7.3%), cardiovascular death (2.8%), noncardiovascular death (12.7%), and normal aging (73.2%).

Results

Low adherence to the AHEI was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular death. In addition, participants with a “Western-type” diet (characterized by high intakes of fried and sweet food, processed food and red meat, refined grains, and high-fat dairy products) had lower odds of ideal aging (odds ratio for top vs bottom tertile: 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.94; P=.02), independently of other health behaviors.

Conclusions

By considering healthy aging as a composite of cardiovascular, metabolic, musculoskeletal, respiratory, mental, and cognitive function, the present study offers a new perspective on the impact of diet on aging phenotypes.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, May 16, 2013 4:02 PM

"Western-type” diet (characterized by high intakes of fried and sweet food, processed food and red meat, refined grains, and high-fat dairy products) has been attributed to many disease of older age. This study characterizes ideal aging as avoidance of these disease. The additional life style strategies of exercise and smoking are strongly associated with favorable aging but diet is an independent predictor.  It makes common sense that the cumulative effect of daily diet over the middle third of life will have an impact on outcomes in the last third of life.

Cynthia Tait's comment, May 18, 2013 1:24 AM
hmmm - this sounds all to plausible - not sure I am going to share this with my parents - as this will mean they have been on the right path all their lives - searching and reading and modifying their diets to suit the long lives they wish to live. Go Mum and Dad. <yeah, I still didn't share it with them - i can hear the 'i told you so' echoes through from the future> :)
Alexis Dickerson's curator insight, September 22, 2013 9:44 AM

Standard American Diet = SAD diet.  Ancestoral health diets seek historic dietary principles with the goal of restoring/optimizing health and reducing diseases of affluence (diabesity, CHD, etc)

Rescooped by David Dellamonica from Heart and Vascular Health
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We Sleep How We Eat

We Sleep How We Eat | Expertpatient | Scoop.it
It's no secret: We are what we eat. And turns out, we might sleep how we eat, too.

Found an association between the number of calories consumed and how long the study participants slept. Those who consumed the most were more likely to be "short" sleepers. Interestingly enough, "normal" sleepers were the next type to consume a lot of calories, followed by "very short" sleepers and then "long" sleepers, researchers found.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, February 10, 2013 3:36 PM

The impact of poor sleep on craving for carbohydrate is well known.  This may be why there is a link between sleep apnea and obesity.  Poor sleep increases appetite which increases obesity which may cause upper airway obtruction and more sleep apnea that takes us back to an increase in appetite ( a nevere ending cycle).  Anecdotally most people will admit that being up all night at work, or caring for a child results in an almost insatiable appetite the next day.

Tina Bilazarian's comment, February 12, 2013 7:57 PM
So will go to bed early and don't work all nite... Will take the advice.
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Mediterranean Diet Might Help Stave Off Dementia

Mediterranean Diet Might Help Stave Off Dementia | Expertpatient | Scoop.it

 Eating fish, chicken, olive oil and other foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids while staying away from meats and dairy -- the so-called Mediterranean diet -- may help older adults keep their memory and thinking skills sharp, a large new U.S. study suggests.

Using data from participants enrolled in a nationwide study on stroke, the researchers gleaned diet information from more than 17,000 white and black men and women whose average age was 64.

The participants also took tests that measured their memory and thinking (cognitive) skills. During the four years of the study, 7 percent of the individuals developed problems with these skills, the researchers reported.

"Greater adherence to Mediterranean diet was associated with lower risk of incident cognitive impairment in this large population-based study," said lead researcher Dr. Georgios Tsivgoulis, from the University of Alabama at Birmingham as well as the University of Athens, in Greece.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, May 1, 2013 12:22 PM

This makes reasonable biological sense since brain and cognitive health is so dependent on vascular health.  Strategies that improve vascular health and function of many years will reduce the likelihood of declining mental function.

Ellen Diane's comment, May 8, 2013 8:33 AM
I am a follower- have been for years.
Ellen Diane's comment, May 8, 2013 8:34 AM
you have some excellent articles;) thank you
Rescooped by David Dellamonica from Heart and Vascular Health
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Moblile App for Cardiovascular Risk Assessment: Framingham Heart Age

"Because of your high cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, and smoking, you have the cardiovascular system of a 68 year old man. Let me know if you want address this."

Get STAT Framingham Heart Age on the App Store. 


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, February 5, 2013 5:50 PM

The Framinham Risk Score (FRS) is well known.  the score helps divide risk into high medium and low risk of having a heart attack (myocardial infarction) over the next 10 years.  The developres of teh FRS subsequently develped the Heart age which adds predictionof other cardiovascular risks including congestive herat failure and peripheral arterial disease.  Its useful and hopefully motivating as a fist step for patients who are interested in understanding their risk.