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Roots of the Mali Crisis

January 19, 2013—The West African nation of Mali is making headlines after a wave of French military actions on Islamic extremist groups now controlling the northern part of the country. National Geographic Senior Writer Peter Gwin has...

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Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's insight:

La crisi propera no es deixa fer prou atenció als canvis geopolítics a l' Africa.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 1, 2013 10:17 AM

This 6-minute video clip is a good way to help students understand the ethnic and geopolitical context of the Mali conflict.  What impact did the superimposed borders of colonialism have in creating the conflict? 


Tags: Mali, Africa, borders, political, conflict, war, colonialism, National Geographic.

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, March 29, 2013 3:32 PM

   This video clip that is great for learning not only about the situation in Mali, but how history leads to the events of today and how much one country can affect another country.

   When Europe colonized  Africa they created borders that separated groups of people that should have stayed together, and they put different ethnic groups together that should have been separated. With this alone comes great conflict because ethnic groups and neighboring tribes that have had conflicts for years now have to operate under the same government somehow and no one is ever really happy so conflicts arise.

    Also, the Arab Spring broke out which brought on all these new ideas and opportunities for the people to revolt and change their country, and some of the people left Libya after the fall of Gadaffi and went to Mali bringing their weapons and anger with them. All of these events led to the Mali crisis today, and it is interesting to see how much one country affects another country and as a history major I am greatly interested in how the history of the country brings about the events of today.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 12:15 PM
The borders were randomly drawn without taking culture, language, beliefs of the native populations etc into account. However drawing borders along ethnic lines didn't work in Europe after WWI. Alot of ethnic minorities were in countires that did not feel welcome. That was one reason for WWII
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What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic?

What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic? | Experimentant | Scoop.it

"Perhaps the biggest misunderstanding is that the Arctic and Antarctic are similar. One’s in the north and the other is in the south; but other than that, they’re the same, right? No, this couldn’t be more wrong. These polar opposites are literally polar opposites.
For starters, the Arctic is a small, shallow ocean surrounded by land: Eurasia, Greenland, Canada and the United States. It’s only about 5 ½ million square miles, which is five times smaller than the Atlantic and 11 times smaller than the Pacific. Antarctica, on the other hand, is a continent surrounded by the entire Southern Ocean.

This may seem like no big deal, but it makes all the difference in the world. It takes a lot of energy to change water temperature compared to what it takes to change land temperature, which means Arctic seawater isn’t as cold as the continental ice sheet covering Antarctica. So, the Arctic sea ice (frozen sea water) is about 10 feet thick, whereas the Antarctic ice sheet (compacted freshwater ice) is over a mile thick."

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Antarctica.


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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 12, 2014 9:05 PM

It would be nice to keep both

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, November 17, 2014 2:51 PM

If we are

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The Science of Earthquakes

The Science of Earthquakes | Experimentant | Scoop.it
From fault types to the Ring of Fire to hydraulic fracking, the Earthquakes infographic by Weather Underground helps us understand the complexities of what shakes the ground.

 

Tags: disasters, geomorphology, physical, infographic.


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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, October 29, 2014 11:03 AM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 1:46 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Mr. Twining's curator insight, November 25, 2014 3:58 PM

Infographic for teaching about the science behind earthquakes.

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African borders

African borders | Experimentant | Scoop.it

"About the history of the creation of Africa borders and debates about African borders."


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Darleana McHenry's curator insight, June 26, 2014 7:33 AM

I thought that this was interesting and decided to share it.

 

Beatrice Sarni's curator insight, July 7, 2014 3:36 AM

always an interesting discussion...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:50 PM

APHG-U4

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 2014 9:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 2014 9:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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Using State Maps in School

Using State Maps in School | Experimentant | Scoop.it

"Have you ever seen a map and marveled over all of the information that it contains? It is incredible how maps can capture so much of the real world and depict so many places. From big cities to small towns, maps use characteristics such as topography, hydrography, industry, and recreation to tell the story of a place."


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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:03 PM

Using maps in school is a concern for many educators that know the value of map skills. This article romanticizes maps and the importance of maps and studying them.

Maps are important for location as they can show absolute location to relative location and help with mental maps.

miya harris's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:10 AM

I think that it is very smart to show large scale maps in schools.Large scale maps can help students to understand their locations better because they can see them in greater detail.Roads,buildings,and water element become more clear.I think every school should have a large scale map to help students better under stand their town, county, or state.

Rachael Johns's curator insight, August 21, 2014 9:31 PM

This is a great idea because students will be able to learn more with the hands on action. Most students just write or copy down notes that they don't really pay attention to but with this the student is more likely to learn from it because they have to measure out where to put the location, name the place that they're plotting, and put the note beside it about why it's important. This will also help students learn the location of places better because they're the ones actually making the map.     ~ R.J ~

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Earthquakes in the Classroom

"An 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, generating a local tsunami.  The USGS reported the earthquake was centered 95 km (59 miles) northwest of Iquique at a depth of 20.1km (12.5 miles).  This video gives the context for this type of earthquake."  


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dilaycock's curator insight, April 3, 2014 2:02 AM

From Seth Dixon: 

 "IRIS(Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night."  

Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:37 PM

Hoe ontstond deze tsunami precies?

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 5, 2014 10:52 AM

http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources

 

Lesson Plans from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Experimentant | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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Germany in figures

Germany in figures | Experimentant | Scoop.it

"Germany is Europe's dominant country.  Its large and strong economy has allowed it to bankroll the bailouts that have kept some of its neighbours - and the euro - afloat.  The graphics below help explain why it is so dominant, and powerful - and also some of the problems it faces."


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 2, 2014 5:34 PM

This comparison between employment rate and household income is important to Germany in many ways. As Germany is Europe's primarily dominant country, Germany needs to keep unemployment rates down while keeping household income up.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 2:24 PM

Germany has proven continuously throughout the years that it is a thriving strong country.  With a booming economy they are able to have a large export economy.  Also with the booming economy and growing jobs people are immigrating from their home countries into Germany in search of jobs, bringing with them their own ideas as well.  Unfortunately even after the reunification of east and west Germany you can still see the divide when it comes to unemployment and income.  In the old east Germany area people have a higher unemployment rate and lower household income than they do in the old west Germany.  If these two areas can become unified on this front than Germany could have an even strong stand as a power in Europe.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 2:03 PM

Germany may be Europe's economic powerhouse, but this article shows that it is not without it's own problems. The effects of a divided Germany can still be seen in the country's economy, with east Germany experiencing noticeably higher unemployment rates and lower income rates than west Germany. Unemployment rates are lower than in the rest of Europe, but wages have not increased evenly and many still rely on benefits to supplement their income. 

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Global Oil Reserves

Global Oil Reserves | Experimentant | Scoop.it

Who has the oil? http://pic.twitter.com/7Njc7OD8rw


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 26, 2014 6:03 PM

This graph depcits Sauda Arabia with the most oil reserves in at 262 Billion barrels and in second place coming in at 132 billion barrels is Iran. These barrels are a very important assett to not only the US but to the world. This is why gas is so expensive because most of the time the US has to import it from differnt countries in order to obtain the amount we need for resources and mostly everything is based on oil as far as some fossil fuels are concerned. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2014 5:22 PM

India is demonstrated at 2,000-2,999 in range of bbps. This amount of oil reserves is very important to the revenue of the country and the way that the poeple survive, natural resources such as oil are a very important and costly resource to obtain. Having oil in your country helps with trade and revenue income and trade routes are compiled which helps the economy.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 19, 8:20 PM

Even though Russia and North America has more natural gas than any other country, Saudi Arabia has the most oil resources than any other country in the world. People who work in the oil industry migrate to Qatar and Kuwait at ages 40-44 because it is closer to Saudi Arabia. Even Kuwait is just as big as Iraq in this map but in reality, it's 20 times smaller. Saudi Arabia's popularity for oil resources spreads throughout the smaller countries that border it such as Qatar, Bahrain, and the United Arab Emirates because most oil resources are not only in Saudi Arabia but also along the Persian Gulf. Iran is also known for oil resources but because Saudi Arabia has a higher population, it borders more countries and its size is more dominant, Saudi Arabia is more popular for its amount of oil resources.

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The Human Imprint

The Human Imprint | Experimentant | Scoop.it
A Human Geography Resource; Especially for Teachers

 

The Human Imprint is home to everything Human Geography related for the student, educator, and the every day Joe/Jane. This site includes geographic related stories, lesson plans, and other links that bring us closer to understanding the “why of where.”


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SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 7:58 AM

Words leading to new Geography treads.

good for up to date articles.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 6:54 PM

Unit 1

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:15 PM

course resource

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Geo-Literacy

Geo-Literacy | Experimentant | Scoop.it

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Matt Richardson's comment, February 28, 2014 7:00 AM
I also appreciate the sentiment here, but as a geography teacher in high school I also find that students are missing very basic information about the world as it is right now. For example, many of my students can't identify more than about three countries in Africa, and I've had students in the past who could not even find the U.S. on a map. Now I force them to take the dreaded 'blank map' quizzes of the world. Its distressing, but it needs to be done. Interestingly, many of my lower level students like these types of tests because there are online games that teach them the locations in a fun way, and also because it is a very literal task. The ones who struggle with higher level material can at least succeed at this if they study.
PIRatE Lab's comment, February 28, 2014 11:16 AM
Yes, as Seth and several commenters have said, we need both. And too often my students don't seem to know the basic facts/history of a particular situation. You must know where you are coming from if you ever want to get to somewhere new.
SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 8:11 AM

Excellent resource about the importance of Geography in understanding the world of the 21st Century.

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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | Experimentant | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 10:23 PM

Unit VII

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:40 AM

unit 7

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

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Global Perceptions of the United States

Global Perceptions of the United States | Experimentant | Scoop.it
Placeholder for the Pew Global Indicators Database

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, February 22, 2014 12:18 AM

Images...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 4:25 PM

Kenya is measure as a parter and alliance with the United States for instance, in the Fall of 2009 a report came out and it proved taht 89% thought of Kenya as an alliance. Shockingly enough in 2013 the alliance with Africa drew at a small decrease of 79%.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:05 PM

APHG-U1 & U3

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Linguistic Family Tree

Linguistic Family Tree | Experimentant | Scoop.it

"When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor. An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian).  Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram."


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:21 AM

Linguistic Family Tree

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:50 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes (Language)

      The image shows how many languages are related and have many common ancestors. Languages are grouped into language families and are even more broadly categorized.

      Language is a huge part of culture and it is the way that people communicate amongst each other. There are hundreds of languages in our world, but as globalization and pop culture diffuse many languages are being lost and no longer spoken. A good example of a dead language would be Latin. Many of our common day languages trace their roots back to Latin, but no one speaks Latin anymore.

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 19, 7:09 PM

This falls under the category of language because it shows the origin, relationship, diffusion, and geography of different religions. It can also be used to tell how specific words originated by knowing the language it branched from.

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The Language of Maps Kids Should Know

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know | Experimentant | Scoop.it
The vocabulary and concepts of maps kids should learn to enhance their map-skills & geography awareness. Concise definitions with clear illustrations.

 


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Anita Vance's curator insight, June 30, 2014 8:54 AM

This article helps give an early start to map skill implementation - even at the earliest levels.

DTLLS tutor's curator insight, July 1, 2014 5:04 AM

Love this website. Not just this article, but the whole idea. Have a little browse around...

wereldvak's curator insight, July 6, 2014 2:53 PM

De taal van de kaart: welke  woordenschat hebben kinderen nodig om de kaart te kunnen lezen?

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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | Experimentant | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 2014 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:47 PM

APHG-U6

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China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers | Experimentant | Scoop.it
In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

 

He says there's a debate about the long-term consequences of China's push into the African continent: Will it create development and prosperity, or will it lead to exploitation reminiscent of 19th-century European colonialism?


Tags: Africa, development, China, industry, economic, podcast.


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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:55 PM

The Chinese are leaving China and venturing to foreign lands for work and to get away from the Chinese people.  In Africa the Chinese have been going to work on jobs, a lot involving infrastructure in countries.  These assignments are usually short, a year or two, but many of the Chinese are deciding to just stay in Africa instead of going back to China after their working term is up.  They note that in China they can create and sell something then a few days later you have ten other people selling the same exact thing that you just created, and that doesn't seem to be happening in Africa, giving them a fairer advantage to what they are selling.  Africa however isn't too sure about the Chinese coming with their business.  They want a better relationship with China and for China to follow the rules that they have laid out about conducting business in their countries.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:40 AM

Is good that China decided to make business outside of its territories. With this plan, they are helping they own economic, but also improving other people lives with the airport and highway.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:05 PM

Though the age of European Imperialism has long since ended, China is beginning to realize the benefits involved with economic expansion into other countries. "More than a million Chinese citizens have permanently moved to Africa, buying land, starting businesses and settling among local populations." Many are worried that this push into Africa could lead to extreme exploitation and disparity among native Africans while China solely benefits. If you compare this scenario with what is occurring in Myanmar and other parts of Southeast Asia, it would seem that China is there specifically for its own benefit. 

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8 mapas que cambiarán tu visión de África

8 mapas que cambiarán tu visión de África | Experimentant | Scoop.it
Sabemos que el continente africano es bastante grande. Pero, ¿cuánto? En una infografía creada por Kai Krause, aparecen algunos de los países más grandes del mundo y toda la Europa del Este como piezas del puzzle que forman el gran continente que es África.
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Interactive Wind Map

Interactive Wind Map | Experimentant | Scoop.it
Mesmerizing.

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 13, 2014 4:30 PM

Stunning interactive wind map.

Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, March 13, 2014 5:23 PM

Excellent for visual learners.

MSU_TCEE's curator insight, March 20, 2014 4:43 PM

The Ides of March definitely BLEW into our area!  Perfect timing to find @Seth Dixon's Scoop of this interactive Wind Map!

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How much is time wrong around the world?

How much is time wrong around the world? | Experimentant | Scoop.it
Why Spaniards have dinner so late? A map of the difference between solar time and clock time around the world.

 

I edited a world map from Wikipedia to show the difference between solar and standard time. It turns out, there are many places where the sun rises and sets late in the day, like in Spain, but not a lot where it is very early (highlighted in red and green in the map, respectively). Most of Russia is heavily red, but mostly in zones with very scarce population; the exception is St. Petersburg, with a discrepancy of two hours, but the effect on time is mitigated by the high latitude. The most extreme example of Spain-like time is western China: the difference reaches three hours against solar time. For example, today the sun rises there at 10:15 and sets at 19:45, and solar noon is at 15:01.


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 4:12 PM

Most of Africa except for a few regions are Solar in terms of the system of time. It goes from the east (solar) with little exceptions toward the south and then in the middle the map demonstrates the Standard time. And lastly in the West the poepulation is mostly Solar which creates the pattern to be solar, standard, solar.

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3 Cities With Freeways Going Nowhere

3 Cities With Freeways Going Nowhere | Experimentant | Scoop.it
Once thought to be symbols of prosperity, innercity highways are now just eyesores — and sources of civic dysfunction — to some new urbanists.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 10, 2014 12:00 PM

This TED Talk also explores what cities should be with old freeways, suggesting that they should be dismantled and the spaces revitalized (and yes, my inner-Californian linguistic roots demands that I call them freeways).


Tags: transportation, urban, planning.

Built 4 Betterness Ed van den Berg's curator insight, March 11, 2014 9:44 AM

How's that for Rotterdam

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An Atlas of Poverty

An Atlas of Poverty | Experimentant | Scoop.it
We think we know what poverty looks like. But how do we accurately account for it? How do we know where to look?
Poverty maps are one place to begin. Technological advances of the past decade—the increased capability to both collect and process improved data—make it possible to reveal the face of the poor in finer detail than ever before. By translating data into the visual accessibility of a map, we can locate poverty more precisely, understand its sources more comprehensively—and attack it more effectively. Such maps can even be used to monitor the results of anti-poverty efforts. Poverty maps can be part of a strong, new foundation for building and tailoring policies and programs, to reach those people that will benefit the most.
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 9, 2014 8:27 PM

This is very revealing

Sieg Holle's curator insight, March 10, 2014 9:10 PM

solutions anyone......

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Experimentant | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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Muslim Woman Discovers Friendly New World When a Winter Scarf Covers Her Hijab

Muslim Woman Discovers Friendly New World When a Winter Scarf Covers Her Hijab | Experimentant | Scoop.it
Chicago's bitter cold temps led to an impromptu social experiment when Leena Suleiman bundled up in a knit scarf and cap.

Via Seth Dixon
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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 2014 3:25 PM

Interesting article about a social experiment...

Linda Alexander's curator insight, February 24, 2014 3:55 PM

A really interesting social experiment that took place in Chicago!

Joy Kinley's curator insight, February 26, 2014 1:11 PM

One slight difference in dress - hijab or cap - and a world of difference in how she is treated.  What makes us "be" part of a group?  A hijab clearly marks a woman is Muslim and for some people that is scary, while others welcome you.

Rescooped by Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé from Geography Education
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Rivers from Above

Rivers from Above | Experimentant | Scoop.it
Get a unique view of these rivers beyond the banks.Photo editing by Lia Pepe

Via Seth Dixon
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Woodstock School's curator insight, February 25, 2014 5:01 AM

The Art of Geography

Mark Burgess's curator insight, February 26, 2014 6:26 AM

Awesome rivers. i love a good river.

ok's curator insight, September 23, 2014 5:45 AM

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