Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust
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Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust
When reading anything how much you know about it going into the reading will help determine how much you take away from it. With this page I hope to provide information about Anne Frank before, during, and after the Holocaust as well as the Holocaust in general to give more background information going into reading and preforming Anne Frank's Diary, the play. More prior knowledge will lead to more understanding when students being the process of critically analyzing the script.
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Two Heroes of the Holocaust - New York Times

Two Heroes of the Holocaust - New York Times | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
Two Heroes of the Holocaust New York Times Regarding “Recalling a defiant lifesaver” (IHT, July 11): I was interested to read Raphael Minder's article about the tribute to Aristides de Sousa Mendes, the Portuguese consul to Bordeaux who issued...
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Here we see two people that risked everything to save Jewish lives during the Holocasut.  What could have happened to them if they were caught?  

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Otto Frank, father of Anne

First 15 minutes of this dutch documentary, made in 2010. To watch the complete movie please contact Anne Frank Stichting or Pieter van Huystee Producties.
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You can hear about Anne from from her father Otto Frank who is the reason we have her diary to read.  

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Anne Frank: the only existing film images

July 22 1941. The girl next door is getting married. Anne Frank is leaning out of the window of her house in Amsterdam to get a good look at the bride and groom. It is the only time Anne Frank has ever been captured on film.

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ANother look at the normal life Anne lived before the Holocaust.  

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Conor Byrne: Anne Frank

Conor Byrne: Anne Frank | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
Anne Frank.jpg. The persecution of the Jews, known by the haunting Hebrew word the Holocaust, meaning sacrifice, by the Nazis in central and eastern Europe occurred over a period of three years, 1942-45, although it can ...
Mara Ofengender's insight:

One author reaction to reading Anne's diary.  Think about what reaction you might have later.

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IWitness: Video testimonies from Holocaust survivors and witnesses

IWitness: Video testimonies from Holocaust survivors and witnesses | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it

IWitness brings practitioners and their learners together at the intersection of Holocaust education and the development of critical literacies needed in the 21st century.


Via John Dalziel
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More stories directly from survivors.

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John Dalziel's curator insight, July 16, 2013 2:29 PM

The IWitness website is dedicated to helping bring first-person stories into the history learning environment.
It’s a free educational website / web tool developed by the USC Shoah Foundation – The Institute for Visual History and Education.

IWitness brings the human stories of the Institute’s Visual History Archive to practitioners and their learners via engaging multimedia-learning activities.

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20 Photos That Change The Holocaust Narrative | Pop Chassid

20 Photos That Change The Holocaust Narrative | Pop Chassid | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
It's time that we looked at the Holocaust differently. Here are twenty pictures to help us do just that.
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Here we can see survivors both past and present taking back their freedom and living the lives they wanted to.  

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Publishing Perspectives : Anne Frank goes Interactive

Publishing Perspectives : Anne Frank goes Interactive | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
On October 18, the Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank will be published as an authorized, interactive app by Viking, Penguin, and TradeMobile.

 

This is great news, on many levels. Only the beginning. There's a future for diarists long gone and taking note as we speak/ type/ think.

 

Will you get the APP?


Via Judith van Praag
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Here's an amazing new way to read Anne's Diary and even interact with it! 

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Anne Frank: Her Diary Reconsidered Biography

Anne Frank: Her Diary Reconsidered Biography | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
What do the previously unpublished pages of Anne Frank's diary reveal about her? Find out at BIO Now at Biography.com.

Via SIN JONES
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There were some pages left out of the original publication.  What more information can they bring us? 

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10 Things to Know About Anne Frank's The Diary of a Young Girl

10 Things to Know About Anne Frank's The Diary of a Young Girl | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
Sixty-six years ago today, the seemingly everyday, innocent thoughts of a teen girl were published.

Via AP US History
Mara Ofengender's insight:

When reading don't forget that this is the journal of a little girl.  We see her thoughts and her insights to life. We are getting a glimpse into the mind of a young girl in one of the worst times she could have lived.  

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The Holocaust Just Got More Shocking

The Holocaust Just Got More Shocking | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
The Germans had vastly more work camps and ghettos than anyone knew.

Via #BBBundyBlog #NOMORELIES Tom Woods #Activist Award #Scoopiteer >20,000 Sources >250K Connections http://goo.gl/ruHO3Q
Mara Ofengender's insight:

New information about the Holocaust still surfaces today. We can always learn more from the past and how to prevent it from happening again. 

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art0001's curator insight, June 5, 2013 9:35 PM

information

 

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Watch:Those Who Do Not Learn From History Are Doomed To Repeat It-Holocaust Survivor

Those Who Do Not Learn From History Are Doomed To Repeat It

Hitler's rise was slow..but based on broken promises...kind of like Obama's.

"Totalitarianism didn't come quickly, it took 5 years from 1938 until 1943, to realize full dictatorship in Austria . Had it happened overnight, my countrymen would have fought to the last breath. Instead, we had creeping gradualism. Now, our only weapons were broom handles. The whole idea sounds almost unbelievable that the state, little by little, eroded our freedom."

America truly is the Greatest Country in the World.
By: Kitty Werthmann 
(1938 Austria - Kitty Werthmann is 85 years old. This is a SCARY piece of HISTORY. Read & perhaps learn something new from HISTORY and "CHANGE".)

What I am about to tell you is something you've probably never heard nor will ever read in history books.

I believe that I am an eyewitness to history. I cannot tell you that Hitler took Austria by tanks and guns; that would distort history. We elected him by a landslide - 98% of the vote. I've never read that in any American publications. Everyone thinks that Hitler just rolled in with his tanks and took Austria by force.

In 1938, Austria was in deep Depression. Nearly one-third of our workforce was unemployed. We had 25% inflation and 25% bank loan interest rates.

Farmers and business people were declaring bankruptcy daily. Young people were going from house to house begging for food. Not that they didn't want to work; there simply weren't any jobs. My mother was a Christian woman and believed in helping people in need. Every day we cooked a big kettle of soup and baked bread to feed those poor, hungry people - about 30 daily.

The Communist Party and the National Socialist Party were fighting each other. Blocks and blocks of cities like Vienna , Linz , and Graz were destroyed. The people became desperate and petitioned the government to let them decide what kind of government they wanted.

We looked to our neighbor on the north, Germany, where Hitler had been in power since 1933. We had been told that they didn't have unemployment or crime, and they had a high standard of living. Nothing was ever said about persecution of any group -- Jewish or otherwise. We were led to believe that everyone was happy. We wanted the same way of life in Austria . We were promised that a vote for Hitler would mean the end of unemployment and help for the family. Hitler also said that businesses would be assisted, and farmers would get their farms back. Ninety-eight percent of the population voted to annex Austria to Germany and have Hitler for our ruler.

We were overjoyed, and, for three days, we danced in the streets and had candlelight parades. The new government opened up big field kitchens and everyone was fed.

After the election, German officials were appointed, and like a miracle, we suddenly had law and order. Three or four weeks later, everyone was employed. The government made sure that a lot of work was created through the Public Work Service.

Hitler decided we should have equal rights for women. Before this, it was a custom that married Austrian women did not work outside the home. An able-bodied husband would be looked down on if he couldn't support his family. Many women in the teaching profession were elated that they could retain the jobs they previously had been required to give up for marriage.

Hitler Targets Education - Eliminates Religious Instruction for Children: 

Our education was nationalized. I attended a very good public school. The population was predominantly Catholic, so we had religion in our schools. The day we elected Hitler (March 13, 1938), I walked into my schoolroom to find the crucifix replaced by Hitler's picture hanging next to a Nazi flag. Our teacher, a very devout woman, stood up and told the class we wouldn't pray or have religion anymore. Instead, we sang "Deutschland, Deutschland, Uber Alles," and had physical education.

Sunday became National Youth Day with compulsory attendance. Parents were not pleased about the sudden change in curriculum. They were told that if they did not send us, they would receive a stiff letter of warning the first time. The second time they would be fined the equivalent of $300, and the third time they would be subject to jail. The first two hours consisted of political indoctrination. The rest of the day we had sports. As time went along, we loved it. Oh, we had so much fun and got our sports equipment free. We would go home and gleefully tell our parents about the wonderful time we had.

My mother was very unhappy. When the next term started, she took me out of public school and put me in a convent. I told her she couldn't do that and she told me that someday, when I grew up, I would be grateful. There was a very good curriculum, but hardly any fun - no sports, and no political indoctrination. I hated it at first, but felt I could tolerate it. Every once in a while, on holidays, I went home. I would go back to my old friends and ask what was going on and what they were doing. Their loose lifestyle was very alarming to me. They lived without religion. By that time, unwed mothers were glorified for having a baby for Hitler. It seemed strange to me that our society changed so suddenly. As time went along, I realized what a great deed my mother did so that I wasn't exposed to that kind of humanistic philosophy.

Equal Rights Hits Home: 

In 1939, the war started and a food bank was established. All food was rationed and could only be purchased using food stamps. At the same time, a full-employment law was passed which meant, if you didn't work, you didn't get a ration card, and if you didn't have a card, you starved to death. Women who stayed home to raise their families didn't have any marketable skills and often had to take jobs more suited for men.

Soon after this, the draft was implemented. It was compulsory for young people, male and female, to give one year to the labor corps. During the day, the girls worked on the farms, and at night they returned to their barracks for military training just like the boys. They were trained to be anti-aircraft gunners and participated in the signal corps. After the labor corps, they were not discharged but were used in the front lines. When I go back to Austria to visit my family and friends, most of these women are emotional cripples because they just were not equipped to handle the horrors of combat. Three months before I turned 18, I was severely injured in an air raid attack. I nearly had a leg amputated, so I was spared having to go into the labor corps and into military service.

Hitler Restructured the Family Through Daycare:

When the mothers had to go out into the work force, the government immediately established child care centers. You could take your children ages 4 weeks to school age and leave them there around-the-clock, 7 days a week, under the total care of the government. The state raised a whole generation of children. There were no motherly women to take care of the children, just people highly trained in child psychology. By this time, no one talked about equal rights. We knew we had been had.

Health Care and Small Business Suffer Under Government Controls: 

Before Hitler, we had very good medical care. Many American doctors trained at the University of Vienna . After Hitler, health care was socialized, free for everyone. Doctors were salaried by the government. The problem was, since it was free, the people were going to the doctors for everything. When the good doctor arrived at his office at 8 a.m., 40 people were already waiting and, at the same time, the hospitals were full. If you needed elective surgery, you had to wait a year or two for your turn. There was no money for research as it was poured into socialized medicine. Research at the medical schools literally stopped, so the best doctors left Austria and emigrated to other countries.

As for health care, our tax rates went up to 80% of our income. Newlyweds immediately received a loan from the government to establish a household. We had big programs for families. All day care and education were free. High schools were taken over by the government and college tuition was subsidized. Everyone was entitled to free handouts, such as food stamps, clothing, and housing.

We had another agency designed to monitor business. My brother-in-law owned a restaurant that had square tables. Government officials told him he had to replace them with round tables because people might bump themselves on the corners. Then they said he had to have additional bathroom facilities. It was just a small dairy business with a snack bar. He couldn't meet all the demands. Soon, he went out of business. If the government owned the large businesses and not many small ones existed, it could be in control.

We had consumer protection. We were told how to shop and what to buy. Free enterprise was essentially abolished. We had a planning agency specially designed for farmers. The agents would go to the farms, count the livestock, then tell the farmers what to produce, and how to produce it.

"Mercy Killing" Redefined: 

In 1944, I was a student teacher in a small village in the Alps . The villagers were surrounded by mountain passes which, in the winter, were closed off with snow, causing people to be isolated. So people intermarried and offspring were sometimes retarded. When I arrived, I was told there were 15 mentally retarded adults, but they were all useful and did good manual work. I knew one, named Vincent, very well. He was a janitor of the school. One day, I looked out the window and saw Vincent and others getting into a van. I asked my superior where they were going. She said to an institution where the State Health Department would teach them a trade, and to read and write. The families were required to sign papers with a little clause that they could not visit for 6 months. They were told visits would interfere with the program and might cause homesickness.

As time passed, letters started to dribble back saying these people died a natural, merciful death. The villagers were not fooled. We suspected what was happening. Those people left in excellent physical health and all died within 6 months. We called this euthanasia.

The Final Steps - Gun Laws:

Next came gun registration. People were getting injured by guns. Hitler said that the real way to catch criminals (we still had a few) was by matching serial numbers on guns. Most citizens were law-abiding and dutifully marched to the police station to register their firearms. Not long afterwards, the police said that it was best for everyone to turn in their guns. The authorities already knew who had them, so it was futile not to comply voluntarily.

No more freedom of speech. Anyone who said something against the government was taken away. We knew many people who were arrested, not only Jews, but also priests and ministers who spoke up.

Totalitarianism didn't come quickly, it took 5 years from 1938 until 1943, to realize full dictatorship in Austria . Had it happened overnight, my countrymen would have fought to the last breath. Instead, we had creeping gradualism. Now, our only weapons were broom handles. The whole idea sounds almost unbelievable that the state, little by little, eroded our freedom.

After World War II, Russian troops occupied Austria . Women were raped, pre-teen to elderly. The press never wrote about this, either. When the Soviets left in 1955, they took everything that they could, dismantling whole factories in the process. They sawed down whole orchards of fruit, and what they couldn't destroy, they burned. We called it The Burned Earth. Most of the population barricaded themselves in their houses. Women hid in their cellars for 6 weeks as the troops mobilized. Those who couldn't, paid the price. There is a monument in Vienna today, dedicated to those women who were massacred by the Russians. This is an eye witness account.

"It's true...those of us who sailed past the Statue of Liberty came to a country of unbelievable freedom and opportunity.

America Truly is the Greatest Country in the World. Don't Let Freedom Slip Away!

"After America , There is No Place to Go."

Kitty Werthmann Interview.m4v
The author of this article lives in South Dakota and is very active in attempting to maintain our freedom. I encourage everybody to read this article and pass it along. I see so many parallels in this country; are we going to sit by and watch it happen? Spread the word; also contact your congressional reps; vote them out if they don't do what they should. If you don't want to be bothered, then you're part of the problem! Google Kitty Werthmann and you will see articles and videos.

 

 


Via littlebytesnews
Mara Ofengender's insight:

This is an indepth look at the Holocasut from a survivor with first hand knowledge.  She spent 10 years unter German and Soviet rule before she waas able to leave for the US and become a citizen.  Most of our families came to America as immagrats seeking refuge and a better life... Kitty Wirthmann is no exception and she got the life she was hoping for. 

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littlebytesnews's curator insight, May 3, 2013 12:36 AM

Originally posted at: https://plus.google.com/u/0/103087425533147519173/posts/PczmwKaceCu

 

Sign The Petition To Stop The Pentagon From Working With Anti-Christian Extremist and Who wants to persecute and court martial Christians in the Military!  http://sco.lt/5RgBIv

:  
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Twitter / History_Pics: Anne Frank in 1934 ...

Twitter / History_Pics: Anne Frank in 1934 ... | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
“RT@CGLawyers: “@History_Pics: Anne Frank in 1934 http://t.co/7yUOLTpkVG”; dear little girl”
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Anne at age 5... 

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Anne Frank's Father Unable to Ban Fear in Annex - Women's eNews

Anne Frank's Father Unable to Ban Fear in Annex - Women's eNews | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
Women's eNews Anne Frank's Father Unable to Ban Fear in Annex Women's eNews Despite not living in continuous tension, fear was a constant in the secret annex Anne Frank and her family hid in during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World...
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Put yourself in Anne's shoes... Would you have been able to ignore the fear you felt for your life? 

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Live the life. - wordsto-remember: The Diary of Anne Frank

Live the life. - wordsto-remember: The Diary of Anne Frank | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
wordsto-remember:
“ The Diary of Anne Frank
” (Foto: wordsto-remember: The Diary of Anne Frank http://t.co/1bTQYBavVQ)
Mara Ofengender's insight:

A beautiful quote by Anne.  Her love for writing i clearly expressed in her journal. Imagine what amazing things she could have written if her stor could have had a different ending. 

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The Diary Of Anne Frank (2009) (full movie)

I favorited a @YouTube video http://t.co/gSHkfV8AJH The Diary Of Anne Frank (2009) (full movie)
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Here we have the movie version of Anne Frank's Diary. We have the chance to see Anne on screen.  

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Video: Bobby’s Story: Living with Faith after the Holocaust

Video: Bobby’s Story: Living with Faith after the Holocaust | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
An Auschwitz survivor shares her faith with the Next Generation.
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Another view on how to live as a survivor of the holocaust. 

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God and the Holocaust : Catholic Stand

God and the Holocaust : Catholic Stand | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
Anthony S. Layne - Holocaust. It's difficult to overstate the impact the Holocaust has had on both Jewish and Christian theology … but it can be done. The philosophical influences responsible for the domination of secularism ...
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A look at the Holocaust from a different religions stnd point. 

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Anne Frank, Disc 1, part 1

Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl (playlist): http://t.co/V9pGj4RvQ7 via @youtube
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Here's a youtube playlist with the narrated and unabridged version of The Diary of A Young Girl.  You can read along with the recording. 

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Anne Frank translator: Past remains important | Culture | DW.DE | 03.03.2013

Anne Frank translator: Past remains important | Culture | DW.DE | 03.03.2013 | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
Author Mirjam Pressler, known for her work on Anne Frank's diaries, tells DW why books about difficult childhoods need to be read and why she became a translator.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Here we see author Mirjam Pressler looking back on reading Anne Frank's Diary and her opinions on how important it is to continue reading her story. Anne's book inspired her in amazing ways even leading her to write her own book and become a translator.  Keep an open mind and see where Anne's story cn lead you.  

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Voices from the reality of the Holocaust: a remembrance, a legacy and a warning - Yorkshire Post

Voices from the reality of the Holocaust: a remembrance, a legacy and a warning - Yorkshire Post | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
Yorkshire Post Voices from the reality of the Holocaust: a remembrance, a legacy and a warning Yorkshire Post It is this legacy that forms the focal point of the Leeds-based Holocaust Survivors Friendship Association (HSFA), whose project The...
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Here's a look at stories told by survivors of the holocaust.  Some were even around the same age as Anne. Can you image having to leave everything you know, friends, and family just for a chance to survive? 

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Imagine a World Without Hate™. Watch the Video - great tune!

Imagine a World Without Hate™. Watch the Video - great tune! | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it

Imagine a World Without Hate™

In honor of our Centennial Year in 2013, the Anti-Defamation League launched the “Imagine a World Without Hate” video and action campaign, and we invite you to participate.

 

Take just 80 seconds of your time to watch this powerful video, which imagines a world without racism, homophobia or anti-Semitism — a world in which the hate violence that took the lives of Martin Luther King Jr., Anne Frank, Daniel Pearl, Matthew Shepard and others did not happen. Imagine what these individuals could have continued to contribute to society if bigotry, hate and extremism had not cut their lives tragically short.

 

After 100 years of fighting bigotry and fostering respect, we are celebrating our successes, while at the same time recognizing that we still have a long way to go to achieve the reality of a world without hate. Join us by watching, sharing and taking steps every day to create a world without hate. Thank you for stepping up to create a world without hate as an individual, community, school or corporation.

 

ADL is most grateful to the families of those featured in the video, whose commitment and participation made this campaign possible, and to the Estate of John Lennon for granting us the rights to use his beautiful and iconic song.

 

Imagine a World Without Hate™. We do. Join us.

 


Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
Mara Ofengender's insight:

Without hate the Holocaust wouldn't have happened.  If we live in a world with no hate how different would it be? 

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How did the Nazis gain power? - Key Stage 3 - The Holocaust Explained

How did the Nazis gain power? - Key Stage 3 - The Holocaust Explained | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
The First World War, which began in the Summer of 1914 and ended in November 1918, claimed many millions of lives and changed the lives of hundreds of millions of others across the world forever.

Via Mrs. Mullins
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A look into how the Nazi's gained so much power as fast as they did in Germany in the early 1900's. This article provieds key informatino into understanding how and why the Holocaust took place. 

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Who Needs Anne Frank?

Who Needs Anne Frank? | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
My son's connection to World War II in 2010 was very different from mine in 1975 or my parents' in the 1950s. Jesse's Anne Frank is not my Anne Frank, and my Anne Frank is not my parents'.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Mara Ofengender's insight:

A look into how the way people read Anne Frank's Diary has changed over time and why students need to continue to learn about the Holocaust and reading this amazing book. 

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, March 12, 2013 12:27 PM

I almost chose to pass this one by...for several reasons.

 

Having been raised in a family that only celebrated the keynote holidays of the Jewish faith; having never been bar mitzvahed, having had no ancestory left in Europe by the time the holocaust took place, and living in a California suburb 5 towns away from the nearest synagogue, I never really connected much to my religious heritage. Though I did dutifully attend Sunday School until I was "confirmed" in the 10th grade. So, I wasn't without a bit of knowledge about the faith and the holocaust. 

 

When I was in elementary school, a "best friend" of mine who lived on my street came up to me one morning and told me that he had some bad news. He was really uncomfortable. It took him awhile to drum up the courage. And then he said, "We can't be friends anymore."

 

I had no idea where this came from. We were best buddies. Our friendship had never had had even the slightest friction. "How come?" I asked, completely baffled.

 

"My mom says we can't be friends because you're going to hell."

 

"What?" Though I'd heard of the horrors of hell, I hadn't yet discovered that hell pretty much is not a concept even mentioned in the Torah.

 

 I've only read the diary 1.5 times.  I did read it in school, probably middle school, or Junior High School as it was known in those days. 

 

In high school, I remember a couple of incidents that reminded me that anti-semitism was live and thriving in my own little neighborhood when I found myself chatting with a few not-very-close-friends during a break and one of the guys, who I didn't know too well but had never had reason to dislike, pulled out what looked like some kind of pre-xerox-like copy of a homemade newsletter specifically focused upon stirring up hatred for Jews. It was really pretty ugly stuff.

 

He had no reason to suspect that the small group of guys included anyone who wouldn't be interested in finding out the "truth" about "those Jew bast----." I was really in shock and in that moment of shock I chose NOT to do the right thing. I chose to quietly hide behind my Jewish anonymity. I didn't "look" Jewish. In fact, in that community with a large population of Mexican families, my dark hair and olive complexion I was more often assumed to be Mexican than a semite.

 

At the time I didn't regret having said nothing; a lack of action that I regret in hindsight. But, truly, I think the shock of the reality of that ratty antisemetic newsletter was so shocking that I was simply stunned into silence. That moment hit me very hard; incredibly harder than the Sunday School lectures about the terrible thing the Germans did to the Jewish people "way back then."

 

I visited the Annex in 1978 and was quite moved by the experience probably because I had read the book. It too made a much deeper impact on me than either the Sunday School lectures or the middle school reading of the diary. 

 

_________

As I continue to explore the introspection caused by having read this scooped article, I've decided to make certain that these thoughts are more like a confession than a professing of some well-considered opinions. They weren't well-considered at all. They just were just the experiences and my perceptions of those experiences as they were when I had not gone terribly deep about ANY opinions I held.

__________

 

This article did present an idea to which I have since given considerable thought. The holocaust IS an important historical event. Though it is a degree of distance removed from the direct relationship to its horrors with every new generation. That generational distance does make a difference in the difference that books like The Diary of Anne Frank and Elie Wiesel's Night make in generations with fewer and fewer "real" or "direct" connections to those events. 

 

No kid should be considered educated even at a minimal level without being exposed to "Man's inhumanity to Man." But, to assume that kid's are lazy or too distracted by less "challenging" literature or by their digital toys, is a fairly simplistic version of the old "kids these days" condemnation.

 

The bridge to engaged relevance for today's youth, is much longer  span than it was for my generation or my parents generation. This is not to excuse a disinterest in an important element of the human condition. 

 

To be frustrated because they don't easily find relevance in experiences that were pivitol in our own lives, is understandable. They may be being moved by more contemporary encounters with experiences of Man's Inhumanity to Man; perhaps in the lyrics of music that they listen to that ironically may generate a parallel scoffing at on our part since if we only have a passing awareness of the most contemporary musical scene. Who knows?

 

Should we abandon the reading of literary texts with extreme cultural, historical, or generational distance from our students. Of course not. But the real challenge is can we sell the relevance? Of course it's relevant. But the real question is do the "see" the relevance. Because, if they don't see it, it isn't there "for them." As, it may not have been there for us when asked to appreciate the importance of relevant learning experience our teachers and parents "knew" was there, but we did not have the same "shorter bridge" to that relevance as they did.

 

If interested in how I'm using Google Lit Trips to attempt to shorten the distance to "seeing" the relevance of The Diary of Anne Frank, see the Literary Location Lit Trip about the annex itself. see: http://goo.gl/v9tyO 

 

it virtually flies to the very street where the annex is in Google Earth. There are only two popup windows, the first has the only known footage of Anne Frank. The second placemark changes the view to an overhead where the annex itself is visible. Then the second popup has an embedded image of the famous bookcase open with the secret annex showing. But, that image is really a link to a complete virtual walk through of the annex filled with images, audio, video and tons of background about the lives of the people who were there.

 

In a sense, it shortens the bridge to relevance by putting the reader right there in the very place where the tragic story happened.

 

 ~ http://www/GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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The Vel' d'Hiv Roundup - Yad Vashem

The Vel' d'Hiv Roundup - Yad Vashem | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
71 years ago today the Vel' d'Hiv Roundup began - French policeman arresting foreign born Jews in Paris: http://t.co/BmsYCmIizg
Mara Ofengender's insight:

The holocasut effected the entire world, here's an example of French jews being arrested for their beliefs.  

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Unforgettable Anne Frank Quotes from YummyQuotes.com

Unforgettable Anne Frank Quotes from YummyQuotes.com | Expanding Prior Knowledge - Anne Frank and the Holocaust | Scoop.it
51 Anne Frank Quotes and Anne Frank Bio to Move You. Easily find an Anne Frank Quote on: Courage, Hope, War, Human Nature, etc. "If I look up into the heavens, I think that it will all come right...
Mara Ofengender's insight:

These are amazing quotes straight from Anne Frank.  Another chance to get some insight into her world. 

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