Exoskeleton Systems
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Exoskeleton Systems
Fast evolving technology to help people work, walk, live and play
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Advanced exoskeleton promises more independence for people with paraplegia

Advanced exoskeleton promises more independence for people with paraplegia | Exoskeleton Systems | Scoop.it

The dream of regaining the ability to stand up and walk has come closer to reality for people paralyzed below the waist who thought they would never take another step. A team of engineers at Vanderbilt University’s Center for Intelligent Mechatronics has developed a powered exoskeleton that enables people with severe spinal cord injuries to stand, walk, sit and climb stairs. Its light weight, compact size and modular design promise to provide users with an unprecedented degree of independence.

 

The university has several patents pending on the design and Parker Hannifin Corporation – a global leader in motion and control technologies – has signed an exclusive licensing agreement to develop a commercial version of the device, which it plans on introducing in 2014.

 

http://tinyurl.com/ba53jy2


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Federal Robotics Initiative Gives $1 Million to Make Brain-Controlled Exoskeletons

Federal Robotics Initiative Gives $1 Million to Make Brain-Controlled Exoskeletons | Exoskeleton Systems | Scoop.it

Robots that can read and respond to brain waves will eventually help stroke patients regain movement, using new neural interfaces that can re-train damaged motor pathways. Neuroscientists have made great strides in brain-machine interfaces that can respond to a person’s thoughts -- a new generation will drive a non-invasive robotic orthotic, retraining the patient’s own body.


Patients who have suffered a stroke or other injury can lose the active use of their limbs, rendering them unable to simply think about moving an arm or hand and then do it. Sometimes it’s possible to re-establish the lost connection, with time and repetitive physical therapy. Researchers at Rice University are using a robotic exoskeleton and a neural interface to improve matters.

 

The project has already successfully reconstructed three-dimensional hand and walking movements from brain signals, according to a Rice news release. Now a $1.17 million grant from the National Institutes of Health and the president’s National Robotics Initiative will test it on 40 patients over the next two years.

 

http://tinyurl.com/a4uaggt


Via Wildcat2030, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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