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What Personalized Learning Really Means For Modern Teachers - Edudemic

What Personalized Learning Really Means For Modern Teachers - Edudemic | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
At first I thought personalized learning was simply 'good teaching' but then I framed it in the context of modern teachers with huge classrooms.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Gina Rogers's curator insight, September 6, 2013 2:51 PM

Interesting ideas on personalized learning.

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Executive Function and technology
How technology can improve or assist executive function skills in a person with a learning disability or ADHD.
Curated by Barbara Hunter
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Why “Just Try Harder” Is a Myth

Why “Just Try Harder” Is a Myth | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
In his book Thinking Differently, David Flink, who has ADHD and dyslexia, explains why “just try harder” is a myth for kids with learning and attention issues.
Barbara Hunter's insight:

....and Yes, this was the least restrictive environment for David. I couldn't read this without thinking about my own 4th grade experience with Mrs. W, and the countless times, as an educator, consultant, and presenter, I heard the same words from teachers' mouths.  

 

In defense, Ross Greene's notion, If we know better, we do better comes to mind.  This book  and blog ( among others), should be  "must reads" for education student in universities, and teachers seeking to understand students who will learn if the methodologies are firmly in place, and administered with fidelity.  Bottom line....WE MUST DO BETTER!

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The Miracle that is Reading http://bodineschool.org/ - YouTube

Reading... While accepted as one of the most critical skills required to succeed, it has been terribly misunderstood for much too long..


Via Lou Salza
Barbara Hunter's insight:

EXACTLY!  Rocket Science....

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Lou Salza's curator insight, September 16, 9:15 AM

In 3 and a half minutes the folks at the http://bodineschool.org/ have summarized the complexity of learning how to read.--Lou

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Executive Functioning in Emerging Adults TY! @Strugglingteens

Executive Functioning in Emerging Adults TY! @Strugglingteens | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
Parth Gandhi, PhD, a clinical neuropsychologist who specializes in the clinical assessment of adolescents and young adults, explained how Executive Function skills can determine if a young adult will be successfully independent.

Via Lou Salza
Barbara Hunter's insight:

Good information! We can't wait to see if EF skills are in place, parents and professionals must guide growth.  By "guide growth" I mean, understand the processes of EF, assess strengths and challenges in children very young, as they are emerging, and engage in metacognitive, direct, and strategic support.

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Lou Salza's curator insight, June 12, 9:27 PM

From our good friend and colleague Lon Woodbury!


Excerpt:

An emerging adult is one that has either turned 18 or is an adolescent growing toward adulthood. As a neuropsychologist focusing on assessments, Parth looks at young adults 18 and over who are not functioning well and question why? "I think we have less expectations for young adults now and we've become softer, less willing to let them fail," he said. "Yet, these kids need to learn from failure and they need earlier training from their parents. Kids aren't being challenged and they need those challenges to learn and grow from. When we protect them, we take away their skill building. I think it is a cultural issue and a family issue, but working with your children needs to be strategic.

- See more at: http://www.strugglingteens.com/artman/publish/WRI-K4HD_140602_-2.shtml#sthash.W52Mxasl.dpuf

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TY! @cdcowen for BishopBlog: My thoughts on the dyslexia debate http://deevybee.blogspot.com/

TY! @cdcowen for BishopBlog: My thoughts on the dyslexia debate http://deevybee.blogspot.com/ | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it

"During February, there was widespread media coverage of a forthcoming book by Julian Elliott and Elena Grigorenko called The Dyslexia Debate. I've seen an advance copy of the book, whose central message is to argue that the construct of dyslexia lacks coherence. Quite simply, dyslexia does not constitute a natural category, in terms of cognitive profile, neurobiology or genetics.

The authors' arguments are backed by a large body of research: people have tried over many years to find something distinctive about dyslexia, without success...."

http://deevybee.blogspot.com/


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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 25, 9:33 AM

Thoughtful consideration of the issues that have plagued identification and service eligibility for decades. When can we simply drop timed tests and move to authentic assessment for everyone?  Perhaps the reason why SAT continue to predict GPA in college is that GPA in college is remains chained to anachronistic methodologies.  Electronic devices, e readers, untimed exams-- should be the standard not the exception! --Lou

Excerpt:


"The first thing to get clear is that Elliott and Grigorenko are not denying the reality of children's reading problems. Their point is a much more specific one about the way we conceptualise reading difficulties and how this affects access to services in everyday life. Their concern is that "dyslexia" implies we are dealing with a specific medical syndrome. Their view is that no such syndrome exists and it is not helpful to behave as if it does. How should we respond to this? I think we need to distinguish three questions:

1. Should we identify those in need of extra help?2. How should we identify those in need of extra help?3. What terminology should we use to refer to those we identify?BishopBlog

http://deevybee.blogspot.com/

 

 

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11 Ways To Keep You & Your Students Focused - Edudemic.com By Katie Lepi

11 Ways To Keep You & Your Students Focused - Edudemic.com  By Katie Lepi | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it

"You’ll probably see a lot of things about beating procrastination, being more productive and focusing better floating around our site. Probably because I’m one of those folks who falls into the trap of LOOK AT ALL THE SHINY THINGS ON THE INTERNET! (This is me. I’m not ashamed, mainly because I know it isn’t just me!) Especially with all of the awesome digital tools available to use these days, distractions are numerous. Getting your students to be able to focus won’t only help you from ripping your hair out in the middle of your classroom, but it will help them in the long run, too.

The handy infographic below takes a look at a number of different ways to help you focus. Share them with your students – while many of them can’t be applied in the classroom, they can be applied at home for a homework workspace..."

 By Katie Lepi 


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Lou Salza's curator insight, March 28, 4:28 PM

Thank you Katie Lepi ! All I can say is "Me, too! I need the graphic!"--Lou

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@ChildMindDotOrg ADHD and Executive Function - Dr. Russell Barkley - YouTube

Dr. Russell Barkley, a professor of psychiatry at the University of South Carolina, is a leading expert on ADHD.


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Lou Salza's curator insight, March 3, 12:05 PM

Russell Barkley explains  Executive Function and the importance of  self regulation in those with ADHD. This 3 minute talk Barkley offers a "Swiss Army Knife" of critical skills and functions and explains  5 challenges of executive functioning:

1.Inhibiting your behavior;

2. Using visual imagery;

3. Talking to yourself;

4.Controlling Emotions;

5.Planning and problem solving ---Lou

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Meeting the needs of all individuals - Special Education

Meeting the Needs of Individuals - Special Education Keynote Presentation - Technology It's Different this time around! October 16, 2013 - Calabogie (Accessibi

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AnnC's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:00 PM

INCREDIBLE AND PACKED FULL OF INFORMATION!!!

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Sticks and Stones: Brain Releases Natural Painkillers During Social Rejection

Sticks and Stones: Brain Releases Natural Painkillers During Social Rejection | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
Researchers find the opioid system responds to social rejection, not just physical pain.

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Lou Salza's curator insight, October 11, 2013 1:36 PM

This is so important. We can now begin to refine our understanding of  social anxiety.--Lou

 

Excerpt: "Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me,” goes the playground rhyme that’s supposed to help children endure taunts from classmates. But a new study suggests that there’s more going on inside our brains when someone snubs us – and that the brain may have its own way of easing social pain.

The findings, recently published in Molecular Psychiatry by a University of Michigan Medical School team, show that the brain’s natural painkiller system responds to social rejection – not just physical injury.

What’s more, people who score high on a personality trait called resilience – the ability to adjust to environmental change – had the highest amount of natural painkiller activation..."

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do you know these smart learning strategies?

do you know these smart learning strategies? | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
Barbara Hunter's insight:

A must read! 

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TY! @cecollins for: Instructional Leadership: Walking the Talk | ASCD Inservice blog by Tim Westerberg

TY! @cecollins for: Instructional Leadership: Walking the Talk | ASCD Inservice blog by Tim Westerberg | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it

"My research into the characteristics of great high schools and my experiences as a high school principal for twenty-six years suggests that there are 10 behaviors, taken as a whole and performed within the context of each school’s unique culture and circumstances, that separate the doers from the talkers..."


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Lou Salza's curator insight, September 18, 2013 4:01 PM

Excerpt:

"Instructional leaders exhibit the following behaviors:

1. Articulate a clear vision of what effective instruction and assessment look like in this school. In the schools in which I work, I recommend the model outlined in the ASCD bookBecoming a Great High School: 6 Strategies and 1 Attitude That Make a Difference. When I was principal of Littleton High School (Colo.) teachers could expect to be asked three questions reflecting that model during any interaction regarding teaching and learning:

What are you intending to accomplish (clear instructional goals)?How are your students doing, and how do you know (frequent formative assessment and tracking progress)?What adjustments are you making for those who are struggling and for those who have already demonstrated mastery (timely intervention and celebrating success)?

Of course, there are other research-based models schools can adapt and adopt (Danielson, Marzano, Fisher and Frey, Reeves, and Schmoker, for example). The point is that virtually all high-performing schools have institutionalized a common language of instruction that the school principal references and reinforces on a daily basis.

2. Fight isolation and fragmented effort. I once heard a conference presenter proclaim, “Inbreeding does not give rise to genius.” Principals as instructional leaders insist on a collective, coherent approach to improvement through promoting and facilitating structures and processes such as PLCs; department/team meetings; course-alike/grade-level meetings; common rubrics; common assessments; collaborative data analysis, goal setting, and evaluation; and walk-throughs/instructional rounds.

3. Remain intimately familiar with the technical core of schooling. Principals that lead schools from good to great know teaching and learning. They read professional literature, attend conferences and workshops, monitor and contribute to targeted professional social networks, and take advantage of available online webinars to stay abreast of the latest research and practitioner advice regarding curriculum, instruction, and assessment. As important, instructional leaders share what they learn with their teachers.  

4. Model high-quality instruction. Think of faculty meetings as classes.

5. Conduct observations and walkthroughs on a daily basis.A principal who is an instructional leader is in classrooms every day interacting with students and teachers about teaching and learning. Time for classroom visits is a priority on these principals’ schedule, and their secretaries, teachers, and supervisors know and respect that.

6. Model effective feedback. Instructional leaders expect teachers to give students focused, specific, and constructive feedback. Teachers need the same kind of feedback, and principals in high-performing schools model high-quality feedback to teachers following classroom observations and walk-throughs.

7. Play a key role in planning, implementing, and evaluating professional development. Professional development must of course be a collaborative effort, but principals must be active members of that collaboration if they are to be viewed by faculty and staff members as valuing lifelong learning by all in the school community—a core value undergirding instructional leadership.

8. Actively participate in building-level professional development. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve led professional development training in which the principal made only a brief opening appearance before disappearing into the office for most or all of the rest of the day. Terrible modeling! What does that communicate to teachers? “This training isn’t really very important?” “I’m above any need for professional growth?” “I’m busy but you’re not?” Ouch!

9. Build productive relationships. Principals who are instructional leaders are constantly working to build relationships among members of the school community by being good listeners, by being open to divergent ideas and viewpoints, by always acting with integrity, and by following through on personal and professional commitments. After all, people, rather than processes, create great schools.

10. Delegate management duties. It should be obvious by now that to effectively engage in the behaviors outlined above, principals must be masters at delegating school management to other members of the leadership team as well as to support staff. Delegate, monitor, and lead.

Both research and common sense tell us that principals who exhibit these 10 behaviors walk the talk of instructional leadership and, in the process, move their schools from good to great.

Editor’s Note: This book is available in print and e-book formats in the ASCD Online Store. A free study guide is also available online, along with Chapter 1: Moving Schools from Good to Great and Chapter 3: Strategy 1—Developing Clear Instructional Goals."

 
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 18, 2013 5:43 PM

I am reading about phenomenology and post-modernism as they apply to leadership. It is more about conversation and less about the teacher-centred view here. It brings an integration of the learning together with teaching as the same thing.

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ADHD and Executive Function | Link Between Attention and the Brain - NCLD

ADHD and Executive Function | Link Between Attention and the Brain - NCLD | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
ADHD and executive functioning: What’s the link? Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (problems with focus and impulsivity) is related to brain functions like organization.
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2013 Learning Disabilities Innovation Symposium — Landmark College

2013 Learning Disabilities Innovation Symposium — Landmark College | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
The 2013 Learning Disabilities Innovation Symposium spotlights cutting-edge research, technologies, and tools, while linking innovators and practitioners in the fields of education and technology.
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More free time: Tech gadgets and time management tools to help students get more done | Citations

More free time: Tech gadgets and time management tools to help students get more done | Citations | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
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Do Education Reformers Know What "College Ready" Means? John Warner

Do Education Reformers Know What "College Ready" Means? John Warner | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it

While the Common Core State Standards look good in theory, as long as they are yoked to standardized assessments, we will not have students that are truly college and career ready.
High stakes standardized tests conducted on computers, with essays graded by algorithm, actively work against the development of the traits that are necessary for college success.


Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, October 7, 10:08 AM

It is a simple idea really: the traits we know will help our students excel in the marketplace can not be measured on a standardized multiple guess ( pre-answered) tests. Curiosity, self-regulation, empathy, passion, skepticism, character an courage, don't fit into an A,B,C,D,F paradigm. --Lou

Excerpt:


"...To do well in college students have to be able to exercise agency and choice, and not multiple choice from A, B, C, D and E.
The most successful students in my class would look at a question on a standardized test, and instead of trying to figure out the right answer, they would ask why they’re being asked this question. They should be able to examine the assumptions behind the choice of question, to analyze the possible biases underneath it. They should be able to consider half a dozen alternate ways the question could be asked. They should be able to take a stab at writing a better question.
CCSS literature says they want to help students think critically, except that to adopt these standards and the testing that must accompany them is to enforce compliance, rather than encourage students to develop critical thinking.
This mania for assessment is crowding out much more important experiences when it comes to student development...."

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 7, 11:07 AM

John Dewey and Alfred North Whitehead argued that far off goals were the adult view of School. Children need something concrete to sustain them. They need to be building something that they can sense today.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD study finds slower development of neural connections

Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD study finds slower development of neural connections | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without.

Via Lou Salza
Barbara Hunter's insight:

This further validates Dr. Russell Barkley's 3 year/30% claim regarding developmental lag in social/emotional problem solving and difficulty with goal attainment...Executive Functions...

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Lou Salza's curator insight, September 16, 11:56 AM

And I thought it was just me!---Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

".....Kids and teens with ADHD, a new study finds, lag behind others of the same age in how quickly their brains form connections within, and between, key brain networks.

The result: less-mature connections between a brain network that controls internally-directed thought (such as daydreaming) and networks that allow a person to focus on externally-directed tasks. That lag in connection development may help explain why people with ADHD get easily distracted or struggle to stay focused.

What's more, the new findings, and the methods used to make them, may one day allow doctors to use brain scans to diagnose ADHD—and track how well someone responds to treatment. This kind of neuroimaging "biomarker" doesn't yet exist for ADHD, or any psychiatric condition for that matter.

The new findings come from a team in the University of Michigan Medical School's Department of Psychiatry. They used highly advanced computing techniques to analyze a large pool of detailed brain scans that were publicly shared for scientists to study. Their results are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences...."

 

Lead author Chandra Sripada, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues looked at the brain scans of 275 kids and teens with ADHD, and 481others without it, using "connectomic" methods that can map interconnectivity between networks in the brain.

julieta's curator insight, October 2, 12:29 PM

agregar su visión ...

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 14, 12:42 PM

This is an interesting article that casts ADHD/ADD into a different light.

 

@ivon_ehd1

 

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College Students: 4 Tools You Can Use to Boost Your Learning Online

College Students: 4 Tools You Can Use to Boost Your Learning Online | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
There are some tools & platforms out there that can drastically change your life. Make you feel not alone. Help you actually learn the content that will help prepare you for the real world.
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How the Brain Pays Attention: key found to shifting our focus from one object to another

How the Brain Pays Attention:  key found to shifting our focus from one object to another | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it

A new study by MIT neuroscientists reveals how the brain achieves this type of focused attention on faces or other objects: A part of the prefrontal cortex known as the inferior frontal junction (IFJ) controls visual processing areas that are tuned to recognize a specific category of objects, the researchers report in the April 10 online edition of Science.

Scientists know much less about this type of attention, known as object-based attention, than spatial attention, which involves focusing on what’s happening in a particular location. However, the new findings suggest that these two types of attention have similar mechanisms involving related brain regions, says Robert Desimone, the Doris and Don Berkey Professor of Neuroscience, director of MIT’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research, and senior author of the paper.

“The interactions are surprisingly similar to those seen in spatial attention,” Desimone says. “It seems like it’s a parallel process involving different areas.”


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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 10, 11:17 PM

There is a simulation of the task that was used in this research--try it then re-read the article. Fascinating information regarding the coordination of different processing areas in the prefrontal cortex where executive functions are understood to reside.--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"....In both cases, the prefrontal cortex — the control center for most cognitive functions — appears to take charge of the brain’s attention and control relevant parts of the visual cortex, which receives sensory input. For spatial attention, that involves regions of the visual cortex that map to a particular area within the visual field.

In the new study, the researchers found that IFJ coordinates with a brain region that processes faces, known as the fusiform face area (FFA), and a region that interprets information about places, known as the parahippocampal place area (PPA). The FFA and PPA were first identified in the human cortex by Nancy Kanwisher, the Walter A. Rosenblith Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at MIT.

The IFJ has previously been implicated in a cognitive ability known as working memory, which is what allows us to gather and coordinate information while performing a task — such as remembering and dialing a phone number, or doing a math problem..."

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The new bionics that let us run, climb and dance

The new bionics that let us run, climb and dance | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
Hugh Herr is building the next generation of bionic limbs, robotic prosthetics inspired by nature's own designs. Herr lost both legs in a climbing accident 30 years ago; now, as the head of the MIT Media Lab’s Biomechatronics group, he shows his incredible technology in a talk that's both technical and deeply personal — with the help of ballroom dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis, who lost her left leg in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, and performs again for the first time on the TED stage.
Barbara Hunter's insight:

I couldn't watch this without thinking about about a recent conversation I had with an uninformed individual who still believes using text-to-speech and speech-to-text is cheating...EVERYONE HAS THE RIGHT TO LIVE WITHOUT THE RAMIFICATIONS OF A DISABILITY!  Join Me!

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20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning

20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning

Via Stephanie Sandifer, David Hain, Himanshu Kakkar
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Anthea Willey 's curator insight, October 28, 2013 4:07 AM

Love this simplified diagram when you need to do some indepth research this could help

Linda Alexander's curator insight, October 28, 2013 9:50 AM

For additional information on Inquiry-Based Learning, go directly to this link: http://www.teachthought.com/learning/4-phases-inquiry-based-learning-guide-teachers/

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 2, 2013 2:03 PM

Always useful to find visual learning frameworks that guide inquiry, including self-directed inquiry.    These questions could also be helpful with co-learning, group and individual coaching, and appreciative inquiry. ~  D

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What Personalized Learning Really Means For Modern Teachers - Edudemic

What Personalized Learning Really Means For Modern Teachers - Edudemic | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
At first I thought personalized learning was simply 'good teaching' but then I framed it in the context of modern teachers with huge classrooms.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Gina Rogers's curator insight, September 6, 2013 2:51 PM

Interesting ideas on personalized learning.

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Have Technology - Will Travel: 2 Legendary Chrome Extensions for Struggling Readers and Writers

Have Technology - Will Travel: 2 Legendary Chrome Extensions for Struggling Readers and Writers | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it

Via Heather Peretz
Barbara Hunter's insight:

I am always interested in applications/extensions that can be "mainstreamed" into existing technology at little or no cost.  This provides a seamless strategic environment for an accademic settng or the workplace.

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SAMR Model Explained for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

SAMR Model Explained for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
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Developing Teenagers’ Executive Function

Developing Teenagers’ Executive Function | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
Developing Teenagers’ Executive Function “Students in my classes over the years have blurted out highly inappropriate comments only to have maturity catch up… (Checking out "Developing Teenagers’ Executive Function" on School Leadership 2.0:...
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Revisiting the inner lives of teenagers with ADHD three years later

Revisiting the inner lives of teenagers with ADHD three years later | Executive Function and technology | Scoop.it
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder affects 8.4 percent of school-age children in the US. If you have ADHD, you already know what that means. It makes
Barbara Hunter's insight:

One of the important threads in this brief discussion is getting to a point where you have found your voice.  This is an aspect of education that is missing most of the time.  Again, we focus so much energy on the WHAT of learning, to the detriment of HOW and WHY we are learning...For an ADHD or LD student to "know thyself" as a learner when they leave high school is a tremendous gift. 

 

The notion of a GAP year is also one that should be considered for ADHD/LD students.  Having the time to mature, further refine interests, and make better life decisions is priceless.  

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