Executive effecti...
Follow
Find
71 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Sean Spence from WorkLife
onto Executive effectiveness
Scoop.it!

The Social Value of Knowledge Has Soared

The Social Value of Knowledge Has Soared | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it

A new book by David Price takes a closer look at how we'll work, live and learn In the future. 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Josie Gibson
Sean Spence's insight:

Really true & relevant. Implications..... how should professional experts reframe 'the firm'? How should universities reframe 'teaching knowledge'? How should mature professionals reframe 'my career'?

more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, November 2, 2013 7:58 PM

In this blog David refers to an interview he did with Patrick McKenna, CEO of Ingenious Media, one of the most successful media investors in the world.


Here’s what he had to say about their approach to knowledge:


”We give a lot of our knowledge away, so that people will engage us to deliver some implementation of that knowledge. We tell people everything we know. We don’t have any great insights that we wouldn’t want to share with everyone, because we’re either raising investments, giving consultancy advice, or we are making investments. The only way we can sell those insights is by sharing what we know. The reason why we don’t worry about giving that knowledge away is because most people can’t implement what they know. The capital value of something these days is the ability to implement it rather than to create it originally.”


Follow David on Twitter here: @DavidPriceOBE

Sean Spence's comment, November 4, 2013 7:06 PM
Really true & relevant. Implications..... how should professional experts reframe 'the firm'? How should universities reframe 'teaching knowledge'? How should mature professionals reframe 'my career'?
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sean Spence from China cross-border M&A
Scoop.it!

Grow Globally: The New Altitude of Cross-Border M&A - Bloomsbury Tax Online

Grow Globally: The New Altitude of Cross-Border M&A - Bloomsbury Tax Online | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it
An article by Mona Pearl Executive Summary • Three out of five cross-border M&A deals do not live up to expectations, mainly due to culture clash, poor due diligence, and contrasting management styles.• With the growing trend of cross-border transactions,...

Via Neil
more...
Neil's curator insight, January 3, 2014 9:12 AM

This article interested us mainly in its part of culture due diligence in pre-merger phase and the post-merger phase of cultural integration. Besides, it mentions how to avoid cultural pitfalls and finally to seal the deal 

Rescooped by Sean Spence from WorkLife
Scoop.it!

The Social Value of Knowledge Has Soared

The Social Value of Knowledge Has Soared | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it

A new book by David Price takes a closer look at how we'll work, live and learn In the future. 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Josie Gibson
Sean Spence's insight:

Really true & relevant. Implications..... how should professional experts reframe 'the firm'? How should universities reframe 'teaching knowledge'? How should mature professionals reframe 'my career'?

more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, November 2, 2013 7:58 PM

In this blog David refers to an interview he did with Patrick McKenna, CEO of Ingenious Media, one of the most successful media investors in the world.


Here’s what he had to say about their approach to knowledge:


”We give a lot of our knowledge away, so that people will engage us to deliver some implementation of that knowledge. We tell people everything we know. We don’t have any great insights that we wouldn’t want to share with everyone, because we’re either raising investments, giving consultancy advice, or we are making investments. The only way we can sell those insights is by sharing what we know. The reason why we don’t worry about giving that knowledge away is because most people can’t implement what they know. The capital value of something these days is the ability to implement it rather than to create it originally.”


Follow David on Twitter here: @DavidPriceOBE

Sean Spence's comment, November 4, 2013 7:06 PM
Really true & relevant. Implications..... how should professional experts reframe 'the firm'? How should universities reframe 'teaching knowledge'? How should mature professionals reframe 'my career'?
Rescooped by Sean Spence from Feminomics - gender balanced leadership
Scoop.it!

More female bosses mean more profits: Companies whose boards are made

More female bosses mean more profits: Companies whose boards are made | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it
A report found firms with three or more female directors has a significantly higher profit margin than predominantly male businesses.

Via Erika Watson
Sean Spence's insight:

True world-wide. And in non-board teams. Think about it for whatever grouping you are in at the moment. Don't equivocate, either. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Spence
Scoop.it!

5 reasons employees hate individual development plans | SmartBlogs

5 reasons employees hate individual development plans | SmartBlogs | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it
I once had a coaching client confide to me that professional development just “wasn’t his thing.” His point: some people don’t see the value in the extra e (RT @SBLeaders: 5 reasons employees hate individual development plans
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Spence
Scoop.it!

Six Simple Steps to Ensure Your Best (The Recovering Leader)

Six Simple Steps to Ensure Your Best (The Recovering Leader) | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it
What does it take for you to be doing your best most days? How do happy, effective leaders, entrepreneurs, professionals, workers, and athletes manage to bring their A-game the majority of the time? It’s simple: either deliberately or not, they...
Sean Spence's insight:

This is one way of looking at being organised around your most productive rhythms. Are you an owl or a fowl (a night worker or a dawn worker)? Pace yourself accordingly. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sean Spence from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Leadership Tips for Cross-Silo Success

Leadership Tips for Cross-Silo Success | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it

Management silos are where innovation dissolves in layers of hierarchy. Great business ideas go wasted every day because employees don’t know what to do with them, and those employees are afraid of wasting company resources trying to figure it out. Here, Nancy Dearman offers some ideas for leaders who want to break down those barriers and encourage employees to cross silos and act on those ideas.

We all know silos within organizations provide essential infrastructure, allowing organizations to function. We also know that the walls of these silos can be barriers to innovation, as well as a root cause of business dysfunction. As a leader, you can enable the quick action required to take advantage of opportunities.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sean Spence from Jesse Jacoby & Emergent | Organization, People, and Change
Scoop.it!

'I Was Wrong ...' Leader Vulnerability Enhances Team Cohesiveness and Trust

OK, so the first discipline that comes from Patrick Lencioni (Obsessions of an Extraordinary Executive) is, "build and maintain a cohesive team leadership." This is a great read — a leadership fable.

Via Jesse Jacoby & Emergent
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Spence
Scoop.it!

7 Steps To A Truly Effective Leadership Style

7 Steps To A Truly Effective Leadership Style | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it
Photo By Search Engine People Blog By Rebecca Hourston If you've ever been led by a Mushroom (everyone's in the dark), a Seagull (swoops in, squawks and dumps), or a Kipper (two-faced and gutless), you'll be all too aware of the leadership style...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Spence
Scoop.it!

Mastering the building blocks of strategy | McKinsey & Company

Mastering the building blocks of strategy | McKinsey & Company | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it
Increase your likelihood of developing effective strategies through an approach that’s thorough, action-oriented, and comfortable with debate and ambiguity. A McKinsey Quarterly article.
Sean Spence's insight:

Some more of the McKinsey insight on how to frame a strategy, though you, as CEO or executive, need to look also at the frame that sits around this - ie who participates, amongst other questions. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Spence
Scoop.it!

How The Informational Interview Helps You Get The Job

How The Informational Interview Helps You Get The Job | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it
People get jobs through connections. If you don't have any make them. And then ask yourself these five questions to prep. (How the informational interview helps@you get the job... It works.
Sean Spence's insight:

Useful for all age groups where you're looking to break into a new industry - have an 'informational' mindset - with the inquisitive approach to match. 

more...
Josie Gibson's curator insight, November 4, 2013 6:34 PM

via @seangspence 

Scooped by Sean Spence
Scoop.it!

How Kevin Rudd's 2013 election campaign imploded - The Age

How Kevin Rudd's 2013 election campaign imploded - The Age | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it
Brisbane Times How Kevin Rudd's 2013 election campaign imploded The Age The group the leader had gathered around him as he dashed around the country were, most prominently, the Labor strategist and one-time lobbyist Bruce Hawker (who helped...
Sean Spence's insight:

This is a fascinating study in how a highly effective person in some ways, has a 'dark side' that gets out of control when under stress, wrecking the potential good. What's more, it was so evident that his opponents were able to strategise around it. 

 

Answer - love the 'Dark Side' in yourself (and in your team) so that it doesn't overwhelm you. In fact you can make it a source of creativity, disruptive change and growth. If you have the courage and honesty for the work!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sean Spence
Scoop.it!

The Best Marketer in Silicon Valley Is Doing Everything You're Not Supposed to Do

The Best Marketer in Silicon Valley Is Doing Everything You're Not Supposed to Do | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it
Tesla CEO Elon Musk tends to reject the status quo -- but that's what gives him his marketing mojo.
Sean Spence's insight:

So, why does it work, really? The idea that this fanaticism is also translated into the product delivering on that brand promise. Humble stuff like reliability, functionality, customer service, supply chain efficiency... and listening. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sean Spence from The Marketing Technology Alert
Scoop.it!

B2B Thought Leadership? Not so much... | Forrester Blogs

B2B Thought Leadership? Not so much... | Forrester Blogs | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it

Condensed...

 

Unfortunately, most B2B marketers fall short when they publish promotional content or threadbare case studies masquerading as thought leadership.

 

Thought leadership is different.  And it's rare.

 

It sits at the pinnacle of good market-facing content production but takes the long view toward the business results it produces. When successful, it engages buyers in an exchange of ideas that delivers value to both sides -- buyers and sellers -- while positioning your firm as a trusted source of great information. And the market, not your marketing department, tells you when your stuff reaches true thought leading status.


Via marketingIO
more...
Ryan Hines's curator insight, September 4, 2013 3:59 AM

A nice diagram, although I'm not sure if I agree with the concept. Starting from the bottom of the pyramid, each step comprises concrete marketing collateral--regularly-produced content and formats that will be familiar to any marketing professional. At the top is this vague, imposing category of thought leadership, which, to me, is expressed through many of the same formats desccribed (case studies, tools, blogs, even advertising).

Constance S. Ward's curator insight, September 6, 2013 3:45 AM

This article emphasizes the rare nature of true thought leadership...

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 8, 2014 5:42 PM

I agree that thought leadership is rare but it needs to be part of the puzzle in today's business.

Rescooped by Sean Spence from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

The 2012 Chief Executive Study: Time for New CEOs - Just Released

The 2012 Chief Executive Study: Time for New CEOs - Just Released | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it

This is the thirteenth year that Booz & Company has examined CEO successions among the world’s top 2,500 public companies. In 2012, 15.0 percent of CEOs at those companies left office, up from 14.2 percent in 2011. This is the second-highest rate of CEO successions in the history of the study.

 

Moreover, 2012 delivered the largest number of planned CEO successions Booz & Co have ever seen. This suggests that companies are working more thoughtfully than ever to ensure they put in place new leaders who will best serve the company for years to come.

Who are those leaders? For the most part, they are familiar faces: companies promoted people from within 71 percent of the time; a quarter of incoming CEOs had worked at the same company for their entire career; 81 percent of new CEOs had the same nationality as the company’s headquarters; and 95 percent were men.

Booz and Co's Chief Executive Study now reaches back to 2000 and includes unique evaluations by geography and industry as well as analyses of major trends in corporate governance, such as dual CEO/chairman appointments and how often companies use the apprenticeship model.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
more...
Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 16, 2013 4:15 PM

This Booz & Company study examined the rate of, reason for, and geographic and industry distribution of chief executive changes among the world's 2,500 largest public companies.


Key findings include:


  • Companies are becoming more proactive about the CEO succession process. Companies are now planning carefully to ensure they have the leaders they need. Planned successions made up 72 percent of all 2012 successions (up from 69 percent in 2011), and forced turnovers were at 19 percent, their second-lowest share ever. This shift indicates that companies are now able to take a more thoughtful approach to transitions.
  • The proportion of female CEOs saw a slight increase in 2012. Only 5 percent, or 15, of the incoming class of CEOs in 2012 were women -- which is a notable rise from the 3 percent average over the prior three years, but still only a tiny share.
  • The "Global CEO"is more of a myth than a reality. Most companies seem to be seeking familiarity in their new CEOs. In 2012, 71 percent of new CEOs were insiders -- people promoted from within. Companies also tended to hire leaders native to their company's headquarters country; 81 percent of companies hired CEOs from the company headquarters country and an additional 9 percent hired CEOs from a different country but the same region as headquarters. Additionally, this year's study found that 25 percent of new CEOs had worked at only one company for their whole career.
Scooped by Sean Spence
Scoop.it!

Be Brave, Be Honest: What Leadership Looks Like From Here On Out - Forbes

Be Brave, Be Honest: What Leadership Looks Like From Here On Out - Forbes | Executive effectiveness | Scoop.it
Be Brave, Be Honest: What Leadership Looks Like From Here On Out
Forbes
This week three colleagues and I are conducting a five-day leadership and management intensive called Rising Leaders.
more...
No comment yet.