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Why leadership conversations matter?

Why leadership conversations matter? | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
Conversations are crucial to leadership because leadership entails the co-creation of a meaningful engagement. Leaders depend on the people they lead and without an on-going dialogue, there is no e...
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Great article discussing conversations that leaders need to have in the workplace today.

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Executive Coaching Growth
Provide information on the growth and depth of executive coaching around the world
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15 Ways to Connect with the Boss

15 Ways to Connect with the Boss | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
Butting heads with the boss won’t help your career. You’ll be branded as a troublemaker regardless of who’s at fault. Connect with higher-ups if you expect to move up. Hard truth: Good performers, ...
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Excellent advice fro Dan.  Some very subtle tips that are worth considering.

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5 Scientifically Proven Ways to Beat Procrastination

5 Scientifically Proven Ways to Beat Procrastination | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
A raft of psychological studies have looked into why we put things off and how to stop. Here are the top takeaways.

Via David Hain, Wise Leader™, Hppy Apps
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Interesting ideas to beat procrastination.

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David Hain's curator insight, April 4, 2:41 AM

I'm going to start using these tomorrow!

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How to Spot Those 'More Than 2 Minute Emails' Before You Open Them?

How to Spot Those 'More Than 2 Minute Emails' Before You Open Them? | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
I though of a quick way to identify if an email is a more than 2 minute email before you open it, take a look and share your thoughts!
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If you are a fan of GTD, you will recognize the idea of recognizing types of email before you open them.  Here is some good advice from the team at IQTell, the productivity application.

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Note to My Workaholic Boss

Note to My Workaholic Boss | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it

How This note from an employee to a workaholic boss represents critiques, challenges and sentiments that many workers face

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How many employees would like to say this to their boss but even more importantly how many employees really believe any of them enough!

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All Leaders Shape Their Company’s Cultural Mindset

All Leaders Shape Their Company’s Cultural Mindset | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
When it comes to creating a thriving organizational culture a key bellwether is the tone that company leaders set. Leaders, take heed: your actions are contagious, whether that tone is positive or ...
Ron McIntyre's insight:

I'll take this one step further and that is that everyone within an organizaion influences the culture however the leaders do set the tone and direction.

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Hiring Wisdom: Top 10 Reasons Why Managers Hate Having to Hire Anyone

Hiring Wisdom: Top 10 Reasons Why Managers Hate Having to Hire Anyone | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
Most managers hate the hiring process because: 10. It takes too much time and they have so many other things on their plates. Many feel screening and interviews just get in the way of …
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Some intereesting data on hiring.  There is a tremendous amount of truth in this list.  What are your thoughts, would you add to the list?

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The Psychology of 'Networked Thinking' on Google Plus - Martin Shervington

The Psychology of 'Networked Thinking' on Google Plus - Martin Shervington | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
Introduction Google+ has changed how I think. I now think in a way that is far more about ‘networked thinking’ than I ever did before. But what does that mean? Well, since joining Google+ I feel that I’ve moved from being focused on ‘outcomes’ along, to an attitude of ‘how can I help?’ This I …
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This is a relatively new assessment tool that may help you understand yourself and others better, it is called leadORS.

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Social Media……Really……I don’t have time for that….. - exploreB2B

 Social Media……Really……I don’t have time for that…..
In today’s busy world of fast moving news, technology and industry, one thing is becoming more and more apparent, and that is Social ...
Ron McIntyre's insight:

This article describes a great new tool for executives who have been reluctant to use social media for various reasons.  The tool is called Scredible.  Well worth investigating.  I am loving it.

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Well-being, employee engagement and ownership - Zealise Blog

Well-being, employee engagement and ownership   - Zealise Blog | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
All these massive benefits begin by simply recognising that employees are people and not resources.
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Another blog from my friend Bay in which he discusses well-being, engagement and ownership.  Good read.

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To succeed in business, identify who you can trust

To succeed in business, identify who you can trust | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
Success in business unquestionably requires some willingness to cooperate with and have faith in others. The question is, how much faith and in whom?
Decades of scientific research have shown that people’s accuracy in deciding if another can be trusted tends to be only slightly better than chance. But this is not because trustworthiness is completely unpredictable. It is because the guidelines most of us use to make such predictions are flawed. We place too much emphasis on reputation and perceived confidence, ignoring the fact that human behaviour is always sensitive to context and can often be better assessed by our own intuition.
So when your company’s money and resources are on the line, how can you do a better job of gauging trustworthiness and thereby improve your likelihood of success? This article draws on emerging research to show how trustworthiness works and offers four points to keep in mind the next time you are deciding whether or not to do business with a new partner.

INTEGRITY CAN VARY

Most people use reputation as a proxy for integrity. However, contrary to common belief, integrity is not a stable trait: Someone who has been fair and honest in the past will not necessarily be fair and honest in the future.
To understand why, we need to abandon the notion that people wrestle with “good” and “evil” impulses. Except in cases of serious psychopathology, the mind does not work that way. Rather, it focuses on two types of gains: Short term and long term. And it is the trade-off between them that typically dictates integrity at any given moment. Individuals who break a trust may reap an immediate reward, but they reduce the likelihood of accumulating greater benefits from exchange and cooperation with the same partner in the future. Which outcome is better? It depends on the situation and the parties involved.
Take cheating. Claremont McKenna psychologist Piercarlo Valdesolo and I have conducted many experiments on the topic and one surprising (if disheartening) result we have found, time and again, is that 90 per cent of people — most of whom identify themselves as morally upstanding — will act dishonestly to benefit themselves if they believe they will not get caught. Why? Anonymity means no long-term cost will be exacted.

POWER DOES CORRUPT

Research by Dr Paul Piff, a social psychologist at University of California, Berkeley, suggests that indicators of socio-economic status can predict trustworthiness. It turns out increasing status and power go hand in hand with decreasing honesty and reliability.
A person’s honesty depends on his or her relative feelings of power — or vulnerability — not on how much he or she has in the bank.
When someone has a higher status than you, or even just thinks he does, his mind tells him that you need him more than he needs you. Consequently, he is more likely to satisfy short-term desires and worry less about the long-term consequences of being untrustworthy.
So when deciding whom to trust, you have to consider power differences, including new and temporary ones. If a potential collaborator has just been promoted or has landed a big deal, he might regard some relationships as less important. And although top firms often have great reputations, that does not mean they treat their small clients as well as their larger ones.

CONFIDENCE OFTEN MASKS INCOMPETENCE

Confidence is so alluring that we are often willing to trust anyone who expresses it, especially when money or other resources are at stake. But too often we mistake people’s self-confidence for true ability. What is the best way to assess competence?
Do your homework. Although reputation is not always a good indicator of integrity, it is a solid predictor of competence. That is because capabilities are relatively stable regardless of trade-offs in rewards and thus are not subject to a moral calculus. So when you perceive confidence in a company’s leaders, talk to current and previous employees, suppliers and customers to verify that it is warranted.

TRUSTING YOUR GUT

In a recent experiment with colleagues at Cornell and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, we filmed people having a brief “get to know you” conversation either face-to-face or via online chat just before they played an economic game that pitted self-interest against cooperation.
Although the average level of cooperation was equal in both groups, people’s predictions for how fairly their partners would act when making monetary exchanges were significantly more accurate when they had previously interacted face-to-face. This meant that a trust-relevant signal had to exist.
To find out what it was, we compared sets of non-verbal cues we had collected from the recordings to see which of them predicted untrustworthy behaviour. We found that four of them — leaning away from a partner, crossing one’s arms, hand touching and face touching — were reliable indicators when occurring together. The more frequently an individual expressed all four cues, the more self-interest she showed by refusing to share profits with a partner. And the more times a partner saw her display those cues, the more the partner expected her to cheat.
Most interesting of all, the face-to-face participants had no awareness that they were using the cues to make inferences about trustworthiness; they had developed more accurate intuition without being able to say why.
These findings demonstrate that our minds come with built-in trust detectors. I suggest allowing your mind to arrive undisturbed at a judgment. Of course, you should not blindly trust your intuition. But you should use it as a valuable piece of information. Knowing the right cues to look for will also increase your accuracy, since you will be less influenced by common misperceptions about trust.
Is it better to trust than not? If you know nothing about potential partners’ situations and cannot interact with them face-to-face, the answer is probably yes. Most accepted models suggest that a bias towards trusting is better when you have no information to go on, as the gains from long-standing relationships tend to outweigh one-time losses.
But when you do have a sense of your counterpart’s situation and can connect face-to-face, you should dispel your notions about how trust works and remember these four rules above. © 2014 Harvard Business School Publishing Corp

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
David DeSteno is a professor of psychology at Northeastern University and the author of The Truth About Trust: How It Determines Success in Life, Love, Learning, and More.
Ron McIntyre's insight:

Food for thought for those of us in Business.  Do we understand the basis of trust?  David provides some psychological insight that is very useful.

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8 Tasks Successful CEOs Do Before Work!

8 Tasks Successful CEOs Do Before Work! | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
When I was working in a large company, a question often poped-up here and there, was how it was possible to perform all the duties, company is placed upon us. The time never seemed enough, while the
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Interesting list from Takis regarding early morning rituals of CEO's.  Now we have seen a number of these in the past but this one gets a bit more detailed.  Worth scanning.

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The Internet of Things Ecosystem: The Value is Greater than the Sum of its “THINGS”

The Internet of Things Ecosystem: The Value is Greater than the Sum of its “THINGS” | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is more than just Glasses, smartphones and smartwatches. It’s more than just smart cars and cities and other “things” that are connected or understood by today’s usage …
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Every wonder what the potential of the IOT will be?  Here is one article with thoughts on that subject. Think Disruptively!

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Creating a Successful Work Culture For ALL Generations

Creating a Successful Work Culture For ALL Generations | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
During his many years of working with groups around the world, Stephen R. Covey (best-selling author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People) had the incredible opportunity to personally …
Ron McIntyre's insight:

I have always advocated the companies role in generational diversity.  It seems that we tend to focus on what guru's are talking about most and relegate the remainder to pull up the rear.  Every generation has a place at the table.  I don't believe in a kid's table nor separating out the older generations.  Everyone should be contributing to the whole.

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Monique Nillessen's curator insight, April 9, 4:44 AM

Een mooi artikel over dat ieders bijdrage belangrijk is!

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Old school leadership is out

Old school leadership is out | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
Leaders must serve, not manage, those who work for them, if they are to help their organization achieve greatness
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Love this concept, "Leadership by Serving Around".  Well worth reviewing.

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Culture: The Leadership Mirror

Culture: The Leadership Mirror | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
For leaders, workplace culture is a mirror that reveals who you are. Here is a quick primer on how to change the reflection.
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The 3 Most Annoying Work Scenarios (and How To Get Out Of Them Unscathed)

The 3 Most Annoying Work Scenarios (and How To Get Out Of Them Unscathed) | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
Learn how to avoid and solve the 3 most annoying work scenarios with simple tricks and workarounds that will help you to get out of them unscathed.
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Excellent article on some difficult work scenarios and how to deal with them from IQtell blogs.  I have been using IQtell now for 3 weeks and I love it.  For All GTD fans!

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Scredible

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Food for thought!  Businesses today must become more active in participating in social media.

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The Challenges in Merging Different Company Cultures

The Challenges in Merging Different Company Cultures | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
Mercer periodically puts out terrific infographics summarizing research around a particular topic. The most recent is “People Issues Affect M&A Transactions More Than Ever” (see it …
Ron McIntyre's insight:

Having lived through a number of these, I totally agree with Derek's points.  Too often the culture is ignored in hopes that it will work but it usually doesn't then trouble gets worse.

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Debunked: ‘Right-Brain’ and ‘Left-Brain’ Personalities — PsyBlog

Debunked: ‘Right-Brain’ and ‘Left-Brain’ Personalities — PsyBlog | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
Evidence from over 1,000 fMRI brain scans finds no evidence people are ‘right-brained’ or ‘left-brained’.
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Interesting POV on this persistent topic.

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The 7 Things Successful People Never Say

The 7 Things Successful People Never Say | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
You want to be successful. Everyone does. But your actual words might be undermining your chances of success. The things you say in the office, no matter how innocuous they seem to you, might be
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Here are 7 phrases one should never say, which ones would you like to add #negphrases

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The Surprising Path to Authentic Impact

The Surprising Path to Authentic Impact | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
The leader you pretend to be; saps vitality, limits potential, and drains fulfillment. You won’t let yourself be seen because you fear you aren't enough and others will reject you. In the end, all ...
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Some great thoughts on vulnerability for leaders from Dan Rockwell.



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Employee happiness – an elusive quest?

Employee happiness – an elusive quest? | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
HC looks beyond the traditional HR ‘engagement’ theory to investigate the science behind happiness at work and the limitations of the effect of HR practices on individual employee engagement. The results could surprise you.
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Find it interesting that we are beginning to see the words happiness and engagement used in similar context today.

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Why the fuss over ethics? It's all about trust | Guest Opinion | Boulder County Business Report

Why the fuss over ethics? It's all about trust | Guest Opinion | Boulder County Business Report | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
The Better Business Bureau Serving Northern Colorado and Wyoming's Institute for Marketplace Trust will officially roll out its BBB Center for Character Ethics at the 16th annual BBB Torch Awards for Ethics on April 30 at the Lincoln Center in Fort
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Great discussion of trust in ligh of BBB's UncommonSense platform.  Just an overview so don't expect details.

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Leadership For the Future? It Means Boldly Tackling Challenges Today

Leadership For the Future? It Means Boldly Tackling Challenges Today | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
Ron McIntyre's insight:

Well thought out approach to this topic buy Laura Stack.  Thanks for sharing Laura, great food for thought.

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Relationship Science Teams Up with New York Stock Exchange

Relationship Science Teams Up with New York Stock Exchange | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
This exclusive edition of the RelSci service will provide NYSE listed
issuers the ability to identify and leverage their relationships with
over three million influential decision makers at over one million
organizations modeled out in the platform. The RelSci platform is
designed to help organizations leverage the relationships and
connections of its employees, boards and executives to acquire new
clients, retain existing clients, enhance relations with existing
investors, identify new investors or strategic partners, and for
strategic data-driven planning.
Ron McIntyre's insight:

Interesting announcement by RelSci.  Will this enhance relationships or strain them?

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