Executive Coaching Growth
13.3K views | +0 today
Follow
Executive Coaching Growth
Provide information on the growth and depth of executive coaching around the world
Curated by Ron McIntyre
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ron McIntyre from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Here's What Scientists Aren't Telling Us About Learning

Here's What Scientists Aren't Telling Us About Learning | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it
It's rare for educators to be kept in the scientific loop, and rarer still to encounter research that might actually compel us to change our teaching hab

Via Beth Dichter
Ron McIntyre's insight:

Interesting POV, worth reading.

more...
Katie Catania's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:09 AM

Research continues to learn more about how we learn, but it is not always easy to find. This post, by informEd, provides 10 suggestions based on current research, and each is discussed in more detail in the post. Below are three of the findings.

* To learn quickly, don't concentrate so hard. Over thinking can make it harder to learn.

* It matters what your learning environment looks like. Did you know that physical characteristics, "such as air quality, colour, and light" can together impact the learning process of primary students by as much as 16% in a single year."

* Understanding a student's learning process occupies the same space in the brain as practicing empathy. I suspect we have all experienced frustration when working with students, but to provide feedback that will help them empathy also plays a role.

This post provides seven additional insights that may make a difference in your classroom. Click through to learn more about research on how we learn.

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, December 11, 2015 5:26 AM

EDUCATION. Or not MATTERs as the out coming results are REAL!

Monica Lamelas's curator insight, March 16, 5:08 AM

Research continues to learn more about how we learn, but it is not always easy to find. This post, by informEd, provides 10 suggestions based on current research, and each is discussed in more detail in the post. Below are three of the findings.

* To learn quickly, don't concentrate so hard. Over thinking can make it harder to learn.

* It matters what your learning environment looks like. Did you know that physical characteristics, "such as air quality, colour, and light" can together impact the learning process of primary students by as much as 16% in a single year."

* Understanding a student's learning process occupies the same space in the brain as practicing empathy. I suspect we have all experienced frustration when working with students, but to provide feedback that will help them empathy also plays a role.

This post provides seven additional insights that may make a difference in your classroom. Click through to learn more about research on how we learn.

Rescooped by Ron McIntyre from Leadership
Scoop.it!

Why Powerful People Just Don't Get Empathy

Why Powerful People Just Don't Get Empathy | Executive Coaching Growth | Scoop.it

If your boss is a jerk, there might be a scientific reason for it. A new study suggests feeling powerful dampens the part of the brain that helps us connect with others.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, ThinDifference, Chery Gegelman
Ron McIntyre's insight:

Not surprising but still needs more exploration by authentic leaders, the key is that one can overpower the tendency to quelsh empathy in their roles. But it is not easy nor is it often truly understood.

more...
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, September 29, 2013 9:42 PM

It might be interesting to consider this concept with some teens that bully, or lead others into self-defeating activities. -Lon

Verica Markovic's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:17 AM

Etude intéressante, mais à nuancer.

Chris Brown's curator insight, October 2, 2013 6:05 PM

"Whether you're with a team at work [or] your family dinner, all of that hinges on how we adapt our behaviors to the behaviors of other people, and power takes a bite out of that ability, which is too bad."

 

A powerful statement.  How can we keep focused on connecting to others so we don't become less empathetic?