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12 Leadership Tips from James Bond

12 Leadership Tips from James Bond | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

James Bond is once again on the move across the world. This blog post on Forbes looks at 12 leadership lessons that Mr. Bond offers.  

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About Excellent Business Blogs

About Excellent Business Blogs | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Leaders cannot win in today’s business world with yesterday’s tools and strategies. In a slower moving, less confusing and more predictable world, things just didn’t change too much, too often or too dramatically.


The problem now is that world does not exist any more! As a result, the mindsets, attitudes, beliefs, processes and leadership competencies that have served us in the past, are not likely to be appropriate today, or in the near future. Leaders need to discover what’s next and play an active role in enacting the change.



The purpose of this site - Excellent Business Blogs - is to highlight some of my favorite articles, videos, graphics and audio that offers a fresh perspective on the transition we face in the modern workplace. 


My personal aim is to provide you with stories you can learn and grow from. The kind of stories that provokes personal reflection and constructive action. 

 

You're welcome to connect via: 

 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kennethmikkelsen


Google+: https://plus.google.com/+KennethMikkelsen


Twitter: www.twitter.com/LeadershipABC

 

Enjoy!

 

Kenneth


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Michael Wolff: Never Stop Asking “Why?”

Michael Wolff: Never Stop Asking “Why?” | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

We won’t remember the commercial, the logo, or the jingle, but we will always remember how a brand (and in turn, a designer) makes us feel. In this 99U interview, legendary designer Michael Wolff shares lessons from a career spanning over five decades. 


What separates a good designer from the rest of the pack, says Wolff, is an unlimited amount of empathy. To do this, approach the world through a child’s mind and have an insatiable curiosity. Ask “why” whenever possible.  


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Tools for Unlocking Innovation

Tools for Unlocking Innovation | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Tim Kastelle's excellent synthesis of this week's interesting innovation stories. Read about GE's open innovation strategy, the importance of design thinking in innovation processes, the art of storytelling, and why companies aren't hiring the best and the brightest people. 


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Why Women (and Men Who Think Like Them) Will Rule the Future of Work

Why Women (and Men Who Think Like Them) Will Rule the Future of Work | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

The way we lead our organizations is changing. We need less command-and-control and more collaboration, community and connection. The shift away from traditional masculine values of leading, like aggression, commanding are giving way to feminine values. And this shift is creating innovative and more relevant businesses.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Feminine values that has emerged as crucial to leadership success in the 21st century: empathetic, family oriented, humble, articulate, nimble, flexible, and intuitive. 


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How to Avoid a Social Media Fiasco

How to Avoid a Social Media Fiasco | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

A panel at the 2014 South by Southwest festival highlighted five ways to avoid a social media crisis.


1. Do not try to capitalize on catastrophic events

2. Plan ahead for social media fiascos

3. Train employees to use social media in the context of your business

4. Recognize that the world is eagerly waiting for you to make a mistake

5. Remember that fiascoes can also present opportunities


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Beyond “Sissy” Resilience: On Becoming Antifragile

Beyond “Sissy” Resilience: On Becoming Antifragile | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

What’s the opposite of a person or organization that's fragile? If you ask most people this question, they’ll likely say “robust” or “resilient. But philosopher Nassim Nicholas Taleb would say that’s not the right answer.


He argues that if fragile items break when exposed to stress, something that’s the opposite of fragile wouldn’t simply not break (thus staying the same) when put under pressure; rather, it should actually get stronger


We don’t really have a word to describe such a person or organization, so Taleb created one: antifragile.


In his book, Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder, Taleb convincingly argues that this powerful quality is essential for businesses, governments, and even individuals that wish to thrive in an increasingly complex and volatile world.


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Why Incentives Don't Actually Motivate People to Do Better Work

Why Incentives Don't Actually Motivate People to Do Better Work | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

You would think that rewarding people for being good at their jobs would make them better at them. 


But social science shows that it doesn't, for a number of reasons. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Incentives ... do not alter the attitudes that underlie our behaviors. They do not create an enduring commitment to any value or action. Rather, incentives merely - and temporarily - change what we do.

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donhornsby's curator insight, April 3, 7:13 AM

(KEY QUOTE) "Motivation is much less about external prodding or stimulation," management sage Clay Christensen explains, "and much more about what's inside of you and inside of your work." 

 

In other words, the most motivated people aren't the best paid, but those who feel a connection with their work. 

Graeme Reid's curator insight, April 3, 8:45 PM

Research has been available for many years that monetary incentives are not (except in limited circumstances) the most important motivating factor for people.  So why do most organisations continue to use bonuses etc as there main way to motivate their people?  

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5 Reasons You Need To Instill Values In Your Organization

5 Reasons You Need To Instill Values In Your Organization | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

We all know that a good company culture makes for happier employees. But when the culture goes beyond that - to core values everyone works by - the results are revolutionary. 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Reference to a related study by Boston Research Group : The view from the top, and bottom.



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Let's Stop the Glorification of Busy

Let's Stop the Glorification of Busy | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Our two main metrics for success are money and power, and they drive us to work longer hours, sleep with our phones and tablets, miss important moments with our families, and impacts our health. In Arianna Huffington's new book Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-being, Wisdom, and Wonder she proposes a third metric for success: thriving. When you thrive, you take care of your health, get enough sleep, and do not live to work.


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The Future of Learning is Stuck in the Past

The Future of Learning is Stuck in the Past | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

With the rise of social and mobile, technology is now part of our everyday lifestyle. The result however, is that consumer familiarity with technology and how quickly they adopt and incorporate it into all they do has outpaced that of companies and institutions.


The impact is profound.


People are learning, communicating and collaborating differently in their personal life. Yet elsewhere, they’re expected to follow dated protocol that is at best counter-intuitive. This is causing a revolt which is only going to become increasingly dire as time and technology progress.

Students, employees, are fueling an escalation of expectations and demands to do things differently.


At the same time, decision-makers are struggling to figure out why investments don’t pan out according to plan. They still see how people use technology as novelty and even frustrating because it’s always compared to the way the world was and not the world as it’s changing. 


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Eli Levine's curator insight, March 25, 8:47 PM

Sorry, conservatives.

 

You can't stay still in this world.

 

Not for long, if at all.

 

And that is the only thing that will remain unchanged about this universe.  Whether you're mentally and emotionally able to cope is a different story.

 

Think about it.

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Millennials in Adulthood - Report From Pew Research Center

Millennials in Adulthood - Report From Pew Research Center | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Millennials don’t seem to take comfort in the same things as their elders do. A new study from the Pew Research Center called Millennials in Adulthood finds that far fewer of them identify with a religion or a political party. They’re less likely to be married than previous generations were at the same age. Only half call themselves patriotic, and a scant 1 in 5 thinks that most people can be trusted. Just a handful expect that Social Security will pay in full when they need it.


What’s going on here? One factor, apparently, is that millennials, currently 18 to 33 years old, find satisfaction in entirely new sources. Their digital lives are hugely important to them, for example. So they may be less alienated than they appear—they just live in different kinds of communities.

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Digital Isn’t Software, It’s a Mindset

Digital Isn’t Software, It’s a Mindset | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

The most dominant companies, no matter the industry, are digital-first. Think Netflix over Blockbuster or iTunes over Tower Records. So how can we take advantage of this trend in our work and with our own projects?


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Why Companies are Not Startups

Why Companies are Not Startups | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it
In the last few years we've recognized that a startup is not a smaller version of a large company. We’re now learning that companies are not larger versions of startups.
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Big Data: The Secret to Revenue Creation [Infographic]

Big Data: The Secret to Revenue Creation [Infographic] | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Big Data has become a major buzzword, but many marketing specialists and salespeople still don't know what to do with the vast amount of information we have access to.


And the companies that are using it often do so in a disjointed manner: Marketing gets the data but doesn't know what to do with it; the focus of Sales is on small, specific data, and so it would be overwhelmed with such a vast amount of information.


It's rare that the two departments work together to benefit from shared information.



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Disruptive Entrepreneurs: An interview with Eric Ries

Disruptive Entrepreneurs: An interview with Eric Ries | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Companies are all too aware of the disruptive power of technology. The author of The Lean Startup argues that the competitive reaction of many organizations remains fatally flawed. 



Via Jeremy Pollard
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Jeremy Pollard's curator insight, April 15, 5:27 AM

I love this guy. Why change? Because it's all that's left!

 

I've spent a lot of time helping people refresh business process around revenue - and that's scary for how wedded to the past people are.

 

But as an ex-product manager, watching the rate of change in staying at the leading edge of any market is now so far beyond what 20 year old back-end models can cope with (and I include old-school management styles in that) it is a bit frightening. 

 

But mostly exciting as hell!  It's like marketing meets marxism indeed... 

 

I tell my kids there are only 5 x jobs left.

 

1. create

2. produce

3. sell

4. count (& protect)

 

The great entrepreneurs start at the front and go as far as they can pulling in help from 4 coming forward.

 

(Oh, No. 5?  dishwasher - don't set your self up for this one kids)

 

 

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Now, Highly Paid Consultants Are Getting Disrupted Too

Now, Highly Paid Consultants Are Getting Disrupted Too | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Clients don’t always need a big sales pitch, a hefty strategic document or to be schmoozed by senior executives. Sometimes, they just need work done.

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Companies Say No to Having an HR Department

Companies Say No to Having an HR Department | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Companies pursuing flat management structures and more accountability for employees are deciding to do without a traditional human-resources department, finding other ways to manage hiring, firing and benefits.

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Greed Is Good: A 300-Year History of a Dangerous Idea

Greed Is Good: A 300-Year History of a Dangerous Idea | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Not long ago, the pursuit of commercial self-interest was largely reviled. How did we come to accept it?


Among MBA students, few words provoke greater consternation than “greed.” Wonder aloud in a classroom whether some practice might fairly be described as greedy, and students don’t know whether to stick up for the Invisible Hand or seek absolution. Most, by turns, do a little of both.


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Rage for Change - Ndidi Nwuneli

Ndidi Nwuneli is a force to be reckoned with. She is a role model for a new generation of visionary African leaders.


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Digital Transformation: Re-Imagine from the Outside-in

Digital Transformation: Re-Imagine from the Outside-in | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Digital technology enables people to do many new things and can alter the human experience in beneficial ways. The most successful companies often use digital technology to fully engage customers and create profitable, long-lasting relationships. According to Watermark Consulting, customer experience leaders have significantly outperformed the S&P 500 since 2008.

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Innovate on Purpose: Renegades, Unreasonable Men and Jesters Drive Innovation

Innovate on Purpose: Renegades, Unreasonable Men and Jesters Drive Innovation | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Gandhi was considered a renegade, a borderline criminal, for his actions to gain status for Indians and to establish home rule.  Gandhi had a great quote for what innovators will face when they introduce new ideas into a very safe and predictable corporate culture.  First they ignore you, hoping you'll go away. They they ridicule the ideas, laughing at the concepts, hoping to embarrass you.  Then they actively fight the ideas, to protect the status quo.  Eventually, if you have the stamina to push through and your ideas are valuable, you'll win.  Who but an unreasonable man could endure such resistance?

Corporate innovation faces a significant challenge, because there are few incentives and many disincentives for unreasonable men and women in the corporate culture.


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Tony Vengrove's curator insight, April 4, 1:11 PM

Couldn't agree more with the last couple of lines in this piece:

"Protecting the status quo is nice, as long as you have strong defenses and weak opposition, but those days are numbered.  You must sally out and attack new markets, enter new channels and perhaps even disrupt your own products.  The reasonable managers and executives aren't going to do that.  Give the unreasonable a chance."

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Know What Kind of Careerist You Are

Know What Kind of Careerist You Are | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Are you motivated by advancement, security, freedom, engagement, or all of the above?


It’s different for different people — even at the same workplace, even in the same role. If you’re trying to answer that question about yourself or your employees, here’s a helpful framework from Managing the New Careerists, by former BYU management professor C. Brooklyn Derr.


Though the book came out more than 25 years ago, Derr offers an interesting historical perspective on the rapidly changing world of work — and keen insights about human nature, which evolves much more slowly.


He outlines five “career orientations,” which tend to shift over time, depending on life circumstances.

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Guy Kawasaki: The Art of Innovation

Guy Kawasaki at TEDxBerkeley 2014: Peter Drucker was right: Innovation is what creates wealth. Innovation had better create wealth because it’s so damn hard to do. The purpose of this piece is to explain the principles of innovation Kawasaki learned in the trenches of Apple Inc.

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How CEO Influencers Impact Social Branding On Twitter

How CEO Influencers Impact Social Branding On Twitter | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

In today's connected, knowledge sharing economy, how important is it for corporate executives to adopt a social networking and collaboration mindset?


Well, social media advances business and reputation objectives and more and more CEOs are starting to see such benefits.

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Welcome to the Social Dance Floor

Welcome to the Social Dance Floor | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

“Social is not appropriate for our industry”, some still believe. Guided by their spreadsheet, they feel safe in the familiar environment of meetings and emails, responsibility assignment matrix, alpha male leadership, controlled communications, and stakeholder “management”. Their size and longevity reflects their success.


As a pledge to modernity, they brandish a corporate Twitter account or a brand Facebook page. Big deal. This is not going to save corporate dinosaurs from extinction. The social asteroid has exploded already, and its effects will be deadly if they don’t adapt.

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Christian Bartosik's curator insight, March 7, 3:12 AM

"Rethink Thinking"

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How Transparent Is Your Organisation?

How Transparent Is Your Organisation? | Excellent Business Blogs | Scoop.it

Transparency is one of those things that's crucial to becoming a social business.  


If you’d like to find out if your organisation is a transparent one, consider if any of the following five attributes are present in your business:


  1. Remuneration transparency – the concept of making peoples salaries freely available has been around for a while, yet many still haven’t been quite brave enough to give it a go. Doing so however removes any grumblings about either pay differentials or discriminatory structuring.
  1. Goal transparency – can you see the goals of both your organisation and your team? Can other people do likewise?  I’ve written previously about the importance of involving employees in strategy making, but the chosen strategy and goals should then be made visible to all.
  1. Financial transparency – alongside this, the financial statements that underpin your organisation should also be viewable by all employees. These should include any KPIs, trends or market comparisons so that everyone can see how the business is performing.
  1. Ethical transparency – at a number of organisations I’ve worked with there have been rumours and murmurings over the expense claims of senior executives.  This can emerge particularly when things aren’t going well. The easy answer is to make all expenses freely available on your intranet.
  1. Information transparency – the final measure concerns information. It should be freely available, whether it’s the minutes from a meeting or the social performance reviews you encourage staff to give one another. You need to open up the decision making process so that all employees are aware of how important steps are arrived at.
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