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Elise's Senior Portraits » Seattle and Honolulu Wedding and ...

Elise's Senior Portraits » Seattle and Honolulu Wedding and ... | ewa-marine | Scoop.it
What started as a goofy test shot to see what happens when I put a 10.5 fisheye into my ewa-marine bag turned into one of my favorites of the entire summer: Once you've gotten that close you should probably just get in and ...
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ewa-marine, flexible underwater housings for photo and video cameras
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AlaskaPhotoGraphics Blog: Part #2: Smolt - Copper River Basin Sockeye

AlaskaPhotoGraphics Blog: Part #2: Smolt - Copper River Basin Sockeye | ewa-marine | Scoop.it

A nice report about salmon on the Alaska PotoGraphics Photograpy Blog under http://alaskaphotographics.blogspot.de

Sockeye salmon smolt head for the salt water after feeding and growing in Summit lake for one year.

Photos taken with a Canon 1Ds Mark III, 16-35mm 2.8L in an ewa-marine underwater housing.

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Diving off Capo Carbonara, Sardinia

Diving off Capo Carbonara, Sardinia | ewa-marine | Scoop.it

Made with my Panasonic DMC-GF1 in an ewa-marine D-B underwater housing at a depth of about 16m / 50ft.


Believe it or not, this is actually a natural underwater rock formation found in the marine reserve at Capo Carbonara off Sardinia, Italy!

The housing is actually rated to 10m / 30ft but preformed perfectly for the whole dive that went down to about 20m / 60ft. No problem. The main reason for the rating is the fact, that you can't use an external flash on top of the camera in this unit, so all photos below that depth do suffer from the lack of light.

More infos about the ewa-marine D-B under www.ewa-marine.com/index.php?id=713

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Ewa-Marine D-B | PhotographyBLOG

Ewa-Marine D-B | PhotographyBLOG | ewa-marine | Scoop.it

Cameras Underwater has announced the availability of the new Ewa-Marine D-B underwater housing for compact system cameras

 

Ewa-marine, the German manufacturer of underwater housings and protective gear for cameras, has manufactured a new housing specifically for the Compact System / Micro Four-thirds cameras. The housing will protect cameras in the surf, in the water, and diving to a depth of 30m.

 

The D-B housing is manufactured from double laminate PVC and has an integrated, optically neutral flat glass port. The flip-up, internal flash, that can be found on some models will fit into the specially designed section on the top of the housing, allowing its use above and under water. It has a pair of non-corrosive and seawater resistant clamping rails which fit together for perfect sealing. It is supplied in a handy yellow carry-case which has a water-proof interior and zippered side-pocket.

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Cheap Trick for Underwater Shooting | Video News

Cheap Trick for Underwater Shooting | Video News | ewa-marine | Scoop.it
Others, like those pictured from Ewa-marine are more robust, customized for your specific camera and have a glass filter for the lens, so no plastic to wrinkle or scratch and ruin your shot. Ewa-marine has all sorts of sizes to ...
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Sarah Lee Underwater Photography

Sarah Lee Underwater Photography | ewa-marine | Scoop.it

There’s no better photography subject like underwater photography for the Summer. This is only a short selection of great captures by Sarah Lee.

And we are happy to say

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Elise's Senior Portraits » Seattle and Honolulu Wedding and ...

Elise's Senior Portraits » Seattle and Honolulu Wedding and ... | ewa-marine | Scoop.it
What started as a goofy test shot to see what happens when I put a 10.5 fisheye into my ewa-marine bag turned into one of my favorites of the entire summer: Once you've gotten that close you should probably just get in and ...
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Nine Quick Tips on Shooting in Harsh Environments

Nine Quick Tips on Shooting in Harsh Environments | ewa-marine | Scoop.it

by Catherine Hall

 

Over the years I have had to learn many things “the hard way”. Hopefully, the below tips will save you some blood, sweat and tears.

 

Humidity: Let your camera acclimate to the ambient temperature

Comfortably cool in your plush hotel room at some tropical resort, you decide to take a trip outside to shoot the local flora. The instant you step outdoors, your camera fogs inside and out. Damn. Try putting your camera in a ziplock bag and putting it outside in the shade for 15 minutes before you charge out. The bag will keep the moisture away while your camera acclimates.

 

Humidity: Pack LOTS of desiccant

In any wet environment, desiccant is your camera’s and electronics’ best friend. Imagine shooting all day in India, rushing back to download the day’s work, only to find that your laptop will not boot. Excitement quickly changes to a surge of dread and frustration (Yes, this happened to me.) Packing the laptop overnight into a moisture barrier bag with a bunch of desiccant was my only savior.

 

Desert: Never change your lens

When travelling to any arid environment, especially one prone to 80mph dust storms (like Burning Man), plan ahead. Visualize your shots and choose a lens that will best suit your needs. Then, don’t take it off till you get home. Airborne dust particles can wreak havoc on your image sensor. Some of this also could be applied to your card. A 32gb should hold the daily shots, only to be changed/downloaded once the camera has been returned to your nightly shelter.

 

Desert: Clean it and Bag it

Bring lots of big heavy duty ziplock bags. Literally stuff some in every pocket. If a dust/sandstorm does make an appearance, throw the camera in a bag, zip it, and run for your shelter! When safe, grab a can of canned air and clean every nook. Follow this with a wet-wipe rubdown.

 

Cold: Keep your friends close. Keep your batteries closer.

And I mean really close (Inside your jacket, against your body). Even full batteries have a habit of dying in freezing conditions. Don’t let them. If your camera dies, first try switching the battery with a warm one. You might even get a couple more shots out of the dead battery once it warms up again.

 

Cold: Beware of rapid temperature changes.

You have lost all feeling in your toes an hour ago. Your fingers are the color of a flamingo and have ceased their ability to press the shutter. It is time to pack it up and head for a warm room, a hot shower, and a drink. Don’t rush. Pay attention to rapidly changing temperatures. Moving from intensely cold space into a warm room poses a variety of possible challenges from condensation to stress on the glass and electronics. Like in a humid environment, a ziplock bag full of cold air around your camera will help slow the thermal shock to your gear when brought inside.

 

Water: Universal housing

Durable waterproof camera housings are a necessity when shooting on or under water. I recommend EWA-Marine housings as they are durable, pressure tested, and versatile (such as a single housing can fit multiple types of DSLRs). These housings can also be used to protect your equipment in any harsh environment: desert, tundra, or rainforest.

 

Protect your Gear in Transit: Select an appropriate carrer

Regardless of where you travel, there is a camera bag made just right for you and your destination. Lowepro, for example, offers a variety of bags that include features such as weatherproofing, shock resistance, light weight backpacks (for you mountaineering types!), and even low profile messenger bags (for the Urban explorer who wants an inconspicuous camera bag.)

 

Travel Smart: A local guide could save your life.

Blissfully shooting via kayak in northern British Columbia, I chose to (luckily) come ashore when I saw the waving arms of some frightened locals. Apparently, I had a near miss with a ship devouring maelstrom. In another instance, I accidentally meandered into the center of a dangerous drug zone in Salvador, Brazil only to be found and forcibly escorted out by the police. Scary? Yes. Preventable? Absolutely. Had I just hired a guide I would not only have been informed of the local dangers, but there would be some accountability. Local guides are cheap, especially in developing nations (often only $5/day). Your life? Not so much.
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