eVolv with Nanomedicine
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eVolv with Nanomedicine
Subtopic of eVolv with Innovative Science & Technology: the frontiers of nanomedicine. Covering topics such as drug delivery, regenerative medicine, brain-computer interfaces and diagnostics. Always with a pinch of criticism & optimism. Comments and discussions are always welcome!
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Novel self-powered nanoparticles developed to deliver healing drugs directly to bone cracks

Novel self-powered nanoparticles developed to deliver healing drugs directly to bone cracks | eVolv with Nanomedicine | Scoop.it

A novel method for finding and delivering healing drugs to newly formed microcracks in bones has been invented by a team of chemists and bioengineers at Penn State University and Boston University. The method involves the targeted delivery of the drugs, directly to the cracks, on the backs of tiny self-powered nanoparticles. The energy that revs the motors of the nanoparticles and sends them rushing toward the crack comes from a surprising source—the crack itself.

Jeroen Verheyen's insight:

Very clever: using the electric field of ions leaking from bone cracks as a homing beacon for drugs!


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Jeroen Verheyen's curator insight, October 7, 2013 11:02 AM

Very clever: using the electric field of ions leaking from bone cracks as a homing beacon for drugs!

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New target to fight HIV infection identified | University of Cambridge

New target to fight HIV infection identified | University of Cambridge | eVolv with Nanomedicine | Scoop.it

A mutant of an immune cell protein called ADAP (adhesion and degranulation-promoting adaptor protein) is able to block infection by HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus 1), new University of Cambridge research reveals. The researchers, who were funded by the Wellcome Trust, believe that their discovery will lead to new ways of combatting HIV.

Jeroen Verheyen's insight:

ADAP protein as a new target for drugs against HIV. Blocking ADAP could reduce replication and spread of the virus. Do we need nanopharmaceuticals? Or will a simple small molecule inhibitor do?

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Jeroen Verheyen's curator insight, October 7, 2013 10:34 AM

ADAP protein as a new target for drugs against HIV. Blocking ADAP could reduce replication and spread of the virus. Do we need nanopharmaceuticals? Or will a simple small molecule inhibitor do?

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First mind-controlled bionic leg a 'groundbreaking' advance

First mind-controlled bionic leg a 'groundbreaking' advance | eVolv with Nanomedicine | Scoop.it

After losing his lower right leg in a motorcycle accident four-and-a-half years ago, 32-year-old Zac Vawter has been fitted with an artificial limb that uses neurosignals from his upper leg muscles to control the prosthetic knee and ankle. The motorized limb is the first thought-controlled bionic leg, scientists at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago reported Wednesday in The New England Journal of Medicine.



Jeroen Verheyen's insight:

Brain-computer interface operated prostetics are getting more and more abundant.

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Jeroen Verheyen's curator insight, October 7, 2013 10:17 AM

Brain-computer interface operated prostetics are getting more and more abundant.

Jeroen Verheyen's curator insight, October 7, 2013 10:17 AM

Brain-computer interface operated prostetics are getting more and more abundant.

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‘Pan-cancer’ study unearths tumours’ genetic trademarks

‘Pan-cancer’ study unearths tumours’ genetic trademarks | eVolv with Nanomedicine | Scoop.it
Analyses reveal cancer-associated genomic changes that can occur in many types of tumour.
Jeroen Verheyen's insight:

New cancer commonalities found. They could lead to a new generation of cancer drugs.

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Jeroen Verheyen's curator insight, October 7, 2013 10:18 AM

New cancer commonalities found. They could lead to a new generation of cancer drugs.

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Nano-dissection identifies genes involved in kidney disease (Genome Research) | Princeton Journal Watch

Nano-dissection identifies genes involved in kidney disease (Genome Research) | Princeton Journal Watch | eVolv with Nanomedicine | Scoop.it

A new method developed by researchers at Princeton University and the University of Michigan called “in silico nano-dissection” uses computers rather than scalpels to separate and identify genes from specific cell types, enabling the systematic study of genes involved in diseases.

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Should you have your whole genome sequenced?

Should you have your whole genome sequenced? | eVolv with Nanomedicine | Scoop.it

Think about it – would you want to know what’s in your genes and what possibly lies ahead?

Jeroen Verheyen's insight:

Should you have your whole genome sequenced? Experts opinion on aspects and ethics.

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Jeroen Verheyen's curator insight, October 7, 2013 10:19 AM

Should you have your whole genome sequenced? Experts opinion on aspects and ethics.

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Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes May Help Improve Longevity of Dental Implants

Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes May Help Improve Longevity of Dental Implants | eVolv with Nanomedicine | Scoop.it
A brighter, better, longer-lasting dental implant may soon be on its way to your dentist's office.
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A foundation for future research

A foundation for future research | eVolv with Nanomedicine | Scoop.it

Since its discovery, researchers have hailed Cas9 — a protein “machine” that can be programmed by a strand of RNA to target specific DNA sequences and to precisely cut, paste, and turn on or turn off genes — as a potential key to unlocking a host of new treatments and therapies for genetic conditions, but only if they fully understand how it works.

Jeroen Verheyen's insight:

Cas9 can cut, paste, and turn on/off genes. This is a very potential candidate for advances in gene therapy. Together with the righ delivery system, this could become a potential therapeutic for a wide range of disorders.

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Jeroen Verheyen's curator insight, October 7, 2013 10:18 AM

Cas9 can cut, paste, and turn on/off genes. This is a very potential candidate for advances in gene therapy. Together with the righ delivery system, this could become a potential therapeutic for a wide range of disorders.