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Evolutionary Information Theory

Evolutionary information theory is a constructive approach that studies information in the context of evolutionary processes, which are ubiquitous in nature and society. In this paper, we develop foundations of evolutionary information theory, building several measures of evolutionary information and obtaining their properties. These measures are based on mathematical models of evolutionary computations, machines and automata. 

 

Evolutionary Information Theory
Mark Burgin

Information 2013, 4(2), 124-168; http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/info4020124


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ComplexInsight's curator insight, July 1, 2013 4:07 AM

This looks very promising - one for reading list for holidays. 

Rescooped by Joachim De Beule from Papers
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A Note on Elementary Cellular Automata Classification

We overview and compare classifications of elementary cellular automata, including Wolfram's, Wuensche's, Li and Packard, communication complexity, power spectral, topological, surface, compression, lattices, and morphological diversity classifications. This paper summarises several classifications of elementary cellular automata (ECA) and compares them with a newly proposed one, that induced by endowing rules with memory.

 

A Note on Elementary Cellular Automata Classification

Genaro J. Martinez

http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.5577


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Predictability of User Behavior in Social Media: Bottom-Up v. Top-Down Modeling

Recent work has attempted to capture the behavior of users on social media by modeling them as computational units processing information. We propose to extend this perspective by explicitly examining the predictive power of such a view. We consider a network of fifteen thousand users on Twitter over a seven week period. To evaluate the predictability of the users, we apply two contrasting modeling paradigms: computational mechanics and echo state networks. Computational mechanics seeks to construct the simplest model with the maximal predictive capability, while echo state networks relax from very complicated dynamics until predictive capability is reached. We demonstrate that the behavior of users on Twitter can be well-modeled as processes with self-feedback. We find that the two modeling approaches perform very similarly for most users, but that users where the two methods differ in performance highlight the challenges faced in applying predictive models to dynamic social data.

 

Predictability of User Behavior in Social Media: Bottom-Up v. Top-Down Modeling

David Darmon, Jared Sylvester, Michelle Girvan, William Rand

http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6111


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Earth is surrounded by a 'bubble' of live bacteria - at 33 000 feet

Earth is surrounded by a 'bubble' of live bacteria - at 33 000 feet | evolutionary cybernetics | Scoop.it

Earth’s upper atmosphere—below freezing, nearly without oxygen, flooded by UV radiation—is no place to live. But last winter, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that billions of bacteria actually thrive up there. Expecting only a smattering of microorganisms, the researchers flew six miles above Earth’s surface in a NASA jet plane. There, they pumped outside air through a filter to collect particles. Back on the ground, they tallied the organisms, and the count was staggering: 20 percent of what they had assumed to be just dust or other particles was alive. Earth, it seems, is surrounded by a bubble of bacteria.

 

Scientists don’t yet know what the bacteria are doing up there, but they may be essential to how the atmosphere functions, says Kostas Konstantinidis, an environmental microbiologist on the Georgia Tech team. For example, they could be responsible for recycling nutrients in the atmosphere, like they do on Earth. And similar to other particles, they could influence weather patterns by helping clouds form. However, they also may be transmitting diseases from one side of the globe to the other. The researchers found E. coli in their samples (which they think hurricanes lifted from cities), and they plan to investigate whether plagues are raining down on us. If we can find out more about the role of bacteria in the atmosphere, says Ann Womack, a microbial ecologist at the University of Oregon, scientists could even fight climate change by engineering the bacteria to break down greenhouse gases into other, less harmful compounds.


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Ed Rybicki's comment, June 25, 2013 3:39 AM
Hey, it's a microbial world - literally! From way above our heads, to way below our feet.
Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, June 27, 2013 1:21 AM

we are everywhere)

Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, July 28, 2013 7:31 AM

we'll have that one in our book as well