Evolution of Digital Culture
63 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Vint Cerf | Internet Hall of Fame

Vint Cerf | Internet Hall of Fame | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Mel Leggatt's insight:

Vint Cerf co-designer of the TCP/IP protocol which underpins the online systems we use today including email and the Web

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mel Leggatt from visual data
Scoop.it!

40 Maps That Explain The Internet

40 Maps That Explain The Internet | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it

The internet increasingly pervades our lives, delivering information to us no matter where we are. It takes a complex system of cables, servers, towers, and other infrastructure, developed over decades, to allow us to stay in touch with our friends and family so effortlessly. Here are 40 maps that will help you better understand the internet — where it came from, how it works, and how it's used by people around the world.


Via Lauren Moss
Mel Leggatt's insight:

A really excellent visual resource for understanding how the Internet has and continues to evolve.

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 22, 2014 1:00 PM
Here's why the Internet works, "... because open standards allow every network to connect to every other network.  (So far...)   This is what makes it possible for anyone to create content, offer services, and sell products without requiring permission from a central authority.

It levels the playing field for everyone and it’s the reason why we have a rich diversity of applications and services that many of us enjoy today.

Source:  Internetsociety.org    ~  D 

Well Connected Mom's curator insight, August 22, 2014 8:04 PM

Curious how the Internet started?  These maps of servers show the progression.

Coolwired's curator insight, August 31, 2014 10:04 AM

This informative site sheds light on the pervasive workings of the Internet.

Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Keeping New Media New: Conserving High-Tech Art

Keeping New Media New: Conserving High-Tech Art | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Conservators are rushing to keep pace with technology as they find ways to extend the working lives of art made with code, VHS tapes, and other rapidly changing platforms
Mel Leggatt's insight:

Art News' account of the struggles facing content creators in the face of the speed of technological change

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Computing History Timeline - Computing History

Computing History Timeline - Computing History | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it
The UK Computer Museum
Mel Leggatt's insight:

Cambridge's Centre for Computing History's online timeline

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

About W3C

About W3C | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Mel Leggatt's insight:

The W3C's account of what it is and how Web standards are developed, agreed and maintained in order to stop our online world descending into chaos

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

United States v. Microsoft Corp. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

United States v. Microsoft Corp. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

United States v. Microsoft Corporation 253 F.3d 34 (2001) is a US antitrust law case, ultimately settled by the Department of Justice, where Microsoft Corporation was accused of becoming a monopoly and engaging in abusive practices contrary to the Sherman Antitrust Act 1890 sections 1 and 2.

Mel Leggatt's insight:

Wikipedia's account of the Antitrust case United States vs. Microsoft Corp over Microsoft's bundling of its own browser in its operating system.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Transatlantic communications cable - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Transatlantic communications cable - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There have been a succession of newer transatlantic cable systems. All recent systems have used fiber optic transmission, and a self-healing ring topology. Late in the 20th century, communications satellites lost most of their North Atlantic telephone traffic to these low cost, high capacity, low latency cables.

Mel Leggatt's insight:

Explanation of the Transatlantic communications cable.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

The world's most popular free OS | Ubuntu

Fast, secure and stylishly simple, the Ubuntu operating system is used by 20 million people worldwide every day.
Mel Leggatt's insight:

Ubuntu offering server, desktop and mobile phone operating systems and the ability to build your own cloud.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

DistroWatch.com: Put the fun back into computing. Use Linux, BSD.

DistroWatch.com: Put the fun back into computing. Use Linux, BSD. | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it
News and feature lists of Linux and BSD distributions.
Mel Leggatt's insight:

Distrowatch's one-stop-shop for information on all the major (and minor!) Linux, BSD distributions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

North American video game crash of 1983 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

North American video game crash of 1983

The video game crash of 1983, also known as Atari shock in Japan, was a massive recession of the video game industry that occurred from 1983 to 1985. Revenues that had peaked at around $3.2 billion in 1983, fell to around $100 million by 1985 (a drop of almost 97 percent).

Mel Leggatt's insight:

Wikipedia's very informative account of the games console market crash of 1983 after the market became effectively saturated beyond demand.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Graphical user interface - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Graphical user interface

In computing, graphical user interface ( GUI, sometimes pronounced 'gooey') is a type of user interface that allows users to interact with electronic devices through graphical icons and visual indicators such as secondary notation, as opposed to text-based interfaces, typed command labels or text navigation.

Mel Leggatt's insight:

Accessible and brief account of the evolution of the Graphical User Interface.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Apple II - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Apple II

The Apple II (styled as apple ][) is an 8-bit home computer, one of the first highly successful mass-produced microcomputer products, designed primarily by Steve Wozniak, manufactured by Apple Computer (now Apple Inc.) and introduced in 1977. It is the first model in a series of computers which were produced until Apple IIe production ceased in November 1993.

Mel Leggatt's insight:

Wikipedia's page on the Apple II. One of the first truly successful, mass-produced microcomputers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Inventing a New Medium - CHM Revolution

Inventing a New Medium - CHM Revolution | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Inventing a New MediumComputer games are as old as computers. The earliest machines were not intended specifically for play—but invariably were used for games.Gaming grew in the 1960s as computers became more interactive and widely available. By the 1980s, increasingly powerful personal computers and dedicated game consoles had established a lucrative new entertainment medium. Today, computer games out-sell films.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

A 30-year history of the future

A 30-year history of the future | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it
MIT Media Lab founder Nicholas Negroponte takes you on a journey through the last 30 years of tech. The consummate predictor highlights interfaces and innovations he foresaw in the 1970s and 1980s that were scoffed at then but are ubiquitous today. And he leaves you with one last (absurd? brilliant?) prediction for the coming 30 years.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

A visual history of computers [JPG] | Visual.ly

A visual history of computers [JPG] | Visual.ly | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it
This is the JPG counterpart to the interactive website. We explore 7 decades of digital computing since the first COLOSSUS was engineered in the UK in
Mel Leggatt's insight:

Excellent condensed history of computers in a very accessible format. Nice work!

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Dot-com bubble - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dot-com bubble

The dot-com bubble (also referred to as the dot-com boom, the Internet bubble and the information technology bubble) was a historic speculative bubble covering roughly 1997-2000 (with a climax on March 10, 2000, with the NASDAQ peaking at 5408.60 in intraday trading before closing at 5048.62) during which stock markets in industrialized nations saw their equity value rise rapidly from growth in the Internet sector and related fields.

Mel Leggatt's insight:

Wikipedia's account of the bursting of the dot.com bubble.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Browser wars - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Browser wars - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Browser Wars is a metaphorical term that refers to competitions for dominance in usage share in the web browser marketplace. The term is often used to denote two specific rivalries: the competition that saw Microsoft's Internet Explorer replace Netscape's Navigator as the dominant browser during the late 1990s and the erosion of Internet Explorer's market share since 2003 by a collection of emerging browsers including Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari, and Opera.

Mel Leggatt's insight:

Wikipedia's account of the browser wars.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Enquire Within Upon Everything - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Enquire Within Upon Everything

Enquire Within Upon Everything was a how-to book for domestic life, first published in 1856 by Houlston and Sons of Paternoster Square in London. The editor was Robert Kemp Philp. It was then continuously reprinted in many new and updated editions as additional information and articles were added.

Mel Leggatt's insight:

The book that inspired Tim Berners Lee to develop the World Wide Web.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Communications protocol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Communications protocol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Communicating systems use well-defined formats for exchanging messages. Each message has an exact meaning intended to provoke a particular response of the receiver. Thus, a protocol must define the syntax, semantics, and synchronization of communication; the specified behavior is typically independent of how it is to be implemented.

Mel Leggatt's insight:

Wikipedia's analysis of communications protocols.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

The birth of the web | CERN

The birth of the web | CERN | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Where the web was born
Tim Berners-Lee, a British scientist at CERN, invented the World Wide Web (WWW) in 1989.
Mel Leggatt's insight:

CERN's own account of the birth of the World Wide Web

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Mozilla — The Mozilla Manifesto

Mozilla — The Mozilla Manifesto | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Mel Leggatt's insight:

The Mozilla Manifesto outlining their philosophy of community-based software development.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

A Photographic History of the Cell Phone - Photo Essays

A Photographic History of the Cell Phone - Photo Essays | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it
A photographic history of mobile telecommunications
Mel Leggatt's insight:

Time Magazine's enigmatic history of the mobile phone in 15 pictures.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Computer History Museum - thm-42b88fd6ecc63 - Stantec Zebra Electronic Digital Computer

Computer History Museum - thm-42b88fd6ecc63 - Stantec Zebra Electronic Digital Computer | Evolution of Digital Culture | Scoop.it
Mel Leggatt's insight:

The Computer History Museum's Selling the Computer Revolution collection browseable by company, decade or application.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Leggatt
Scoop.it!

Home computer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Home computer

Home computers were a class of microcomputers entering the market in 1977, and becoming common during the 1980s. They were marketed to consumers as affordable and accessible computers that, for the first time, were intended for the use of a single nontechnical user.

Mel Leggatt's insight:

A comprehensive one-stop-shop for the history of home, or microcomputers.

more...
No comment yet.