evolution numérique
Follow
367 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Amazing Science
onto evolution numérique
Scoop.it!

Stem-Cell Therapy for Blindness Is Moving Towards Clinical Trials

Stem-Cell Therapy for Blindness Is Moving Towards Clinical Trials | evolution numérique | Scoop.it
Advanced Cell Technology is testing a stem-cell treatment for blindness that could preserve vision and potentially reverse vision loss.

 

A new treatment for macular degeneration is close to the next stage of human testing—a noteworthy event not just for the millions of patients it could help, but for its potential to become the first therapy based on embryonic stem cells.

 

This year, the Boston-area company Advanced Cell Technology plans to move its stem-cell treatment for two forms of vision loss into advanced human trials. The company has already reported that the treatment is safe (see “Eye Study Is a Small but Crucial Advance for Stem-Cell Therapy”), although a full report of the results from the early, safety-focused testing has yet to be published. The planned trials will test whether it is effective. The treatment will be tested both on patients with Stargardt’s disease (an inherited form of progressive vision loss that can affect children) and on those with age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss among people 65 and older.

 

Although complete data from the trials of ACT’s treatments have yet to be published, the company has reported impressive results with one patient, who recovered vision after being deemed legally blind. Now the company plans to publish the data from two clinical trials taking place in the U.S. and the E.U. in a peer-reviewed academic journal. Each of these early-stage trials includes 12 patients affected by either macular degeneration or Stargardt’s disease.

 

The more advanced trials will have dozens of participants, says ACT’s head of clinical development, Eddy Anglade. If proved safe and effective, the cellular therapy could preserve the vision of millions affected by age-related macular degeneration. By 2020, as the population ages, nearly 200 million people worldwide will have the disease, estimate researchers. Currently, there are no treatments available for the most common form, dry age-related macular degeneration.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Lucile Debethune's insight:

Je m'éloigne un peu des sujets de cybernétique mais pas si loin, car la bioingénierie est aussi un moyen technologique de modifier l'humain. Les cellules souches sont reprogrammes depuis quelques années, et on peut asssister à des sauts technologiques de plus en plus important, notamment avec l'utilisation de technologies comme les imprimantes 3D pour recréer des organes, gerer les relation avec des prothèses bioméchaniques, etc... 

Aun iveau de la vision plusieurs grands axes émergent, soit avec un "remède" comme ici (surtout face à la dégénration cellulaire due à certaines maladie ou à la vieillesse), soit avec des prothèses de plus en plus miniaturisées et reliées au cerveau. 

more...
No comment yet.
evolution numérique
comment les nouvelles technologies nous font changer
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lucile Debethune
Scoop.it!

Should we redesign humans?

Should we redesign humans? | evolution numérique | Scoop.it

Je parlais The age of bioengineering is upon us, with scientists' understanding of how to engineer cells, tissues and organs improving at a rapid pace. Here, how this could affect the future of our physical bodies.

Lucile Debethune's insight:

Je parlais de bioingénierie, je me suis dit que des exemples pourraient aider... voici quelques impressionantes démonstration de quelques avancées dans ce domaine 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lucile Debethune
Scoop.it!

Imprime-toi toi-même - New Yorker

Imprime-toi toi-même - New Yorker | evolution numérique | Scoop.it
Jerome Groopman pour le New Yorker fait le point sur le rôle de plus en plus étonnant que joue l’impression 3D dans le domaine de la médecine.
Il évoque d’abord le rôle qu’elle a joué dans l’opération...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

NIH Launches 3D Print Exchange Library

NIH Launches 3D Print Exchange Library | evolution numérique | Scoop.it


The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched the NIH 3D Print Exchange, a public website that enables users to share, download and edit 3D print files related to health and science. These files can be used, for example, to print custom laboratory equipment and models of bacteria and human anatomy. The launch coincides with the first White House Maker Faire, an event designed to celebrate innovation in science, technology, engineering and math.

Few scientific 3D-printable models are available online, and the expertise required to generate and validate such models remains a barrier. The NIH 3D Print Exchange aims to eliminate this gap with an open, comprehensive, and interactive website for searching, browsing, downloading, and sharing biomedical 3D print files, modeling tutorials, and educational material.

 

3D printing is a potential game changer for medical research,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. “At NIH, we have seen an incredible return on investment; pennies’ worth of plastic have helped investigators address important scientific questions while saving time and money. We hope that the 3D Print Exchange will expand interest and participation in this new and exciting field among scientists, educators and students.”

 

IH uses 3D printing, or the creation of a physical object from a digital model, to study viruses, repair and enhance lab apparatus, and help plan medical procedures. The 3D Print Exchange makes these types of files freely available, along with video tutorials for new users and a discussion forum to promote collaboration. The site also features tools that convert scientific and clinical data into ready-to-print 3D files.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Lucile Debethune's insight:

Les scientifiques ont été les premiers à ouvrir leur recherches, articles, etc mais en passant à une bibliothèque de modélisation 3D dans le domaine de la santé, ce sont encore de nouveaux horizons d'études qui s'ouvrent, permettant de plus facilement conduire des recherches.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Exploration de données
Scoop.it!

Meet the algorithm that can learn "everything about anything"

Meet the algorithm that can learn "everything about anything" | evolution numérique | Scoop.it

Learn EVerything about ANything was created by a group of researchers out of the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence and the University of Washington. One of them, Carlos Guestrin, is also co-founder and CEO of a data science startup called GraphLab. What’s really interesting about LEVAN is that it’s neither human-supervised nor unsupervised (like many deep learning systems), but what its creators call “webly supervised.” (...) LEVAN uses the web to learn everything it needs to know. It scours Google Books Ngrams to learn common phrases associated with a particular concept, then searches for those phrases in web image repositories such as Google Images, Bing and Flickr. More impressive still is that because LEVAN uses text and image references to teach itself concepts, it’s also able to learn when words or phrases mean the same thing.
So far, LEVAN has modeled 150 different concepts and more than 50,000 sub-concepts, and has annotated more than 10 million images with information about what’s in them and what’s happening in them.

 

 


Via cyberlabe
Lucile Debethune's insight:

la modelisation automatique de concept est une des pistes pour l'amélioration des intélligneces artificielles. L'initiative LEVAN est très intéressante à ce sujet.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from My Favorite TED Talks
Scoop.it!

Amber Case: We are all cyborgs now

Technology is evolving us, says Amber Case, as we become a screen-staring, button-clicking new version of homo sapiens. We now rely on "external brains" (cell phones and computers) to communicate, remember, even live out secondary lives.


Via axelletess
Lucile Debethune's insight:

Les smartphone sont ils une extension de notre cerveau ou une partie de notre être étendu ? Sommes nous déjà des Cyborg ? 

more...
Jane Franken's curator insight, March 21, 2013 7:42 AM

This talk takes an anthropological view of humans and technology which lends context to and directly supports ideas specific to the future of software development.  Case describes the way emerging technology is freely traversing the barrier between physical and mental, the implications of which will surely impact heavily on software development.

Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from UtopianDynamics
Scoop.it!

Google invents smart contact lens with built-in camera: Superhuman Terminator-like vision here we come

Google invents smart contact lens with built-in camera: Superhuman Terminator-like vision here we come | evolution numérique | Scoop.it
Google has invented a new smart contact lens with an integrated camera. By virtue of being part of the contact lens, the camera would naturally follow your gaze, allowing for a huge range of awesome applications, from the basis of a bionic eye system for blind and visually impaired people, through to early warning systems (the camera spots a hazard before your brain does), facial recognition, and superhuman powers (telescopic and infrared/night vision). In related news, Google Glass is publicly available today in the US for one day only (still priced at $1500).

Via Paulo Furtado
Lucile Debethune's insight:

Vous pensiez que Minority report était de la science fiction ? allez faire un tour sur les démos de P. Mistry ou J. Underkoffler pour la visualisation ou sur un article que j'ai fait passer ici sur les technologies "mood-sensitive" (Edit : ici en fait :/http://www.scoop.it/t/robot-cerveau). Vous pensez que Terminator n'arriverais jamais? c'est peut être pour demain, en tout cas pour la vision (les recherches sont conduites depuis longtemps http://iopscience.iop.org/0960-1317/21/12/125014) mais Google pourrait le commercialiser demain...)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lucile Debethune
Scoop.it!

Découvrez à quoi ressemble le cerveau humain dans cette ... - Atlantico.fr

Découvrez à quoi ressemble le cerveau humain dans cette ... - Atlantico.fr | evolution numérique | Scoop.it
Daily Geek Show
Découvrez à quoi ressemble le cerveau humain dans cette ...
Atlantico.fr
Les chercheurs de l'université de San Diego (Californie) ont récemment mis en ligne une vidéo représentant avec fidélité l'activité du cerveau humain.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

The internet of everything--annihilating time and space

The internet of everything--annihilating time and space | evolution numérique | Scoop.it

In the future of the internet of things, Wi-Fi is going to be everywhere, and the internet will connect you to every person and thing on the planet via transportation, teleportation and telepresence. A trillion wormholes will let you reach out from anywhere on earth and hug your loved ones, or try on a new pair of shoes, or unlock your bike.

 

In the future beyond the internet of things, all your senses will be wired directly into the internet’s wormholes, and you’ll be completely indifferent to the location of your physical body. When you look around you, you won’t be looking into a nearby region of space. You’ll be surfing an internet that annihilates all time and space – the internet of everything.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
Mlik Sahib's curator insight, December 2, 2013 1:46 AM

"Did you know you have two wireless modems in your head? Your eyes constantly receive radio signals in the visible spectrum, and your sense of vision connects your brain to nearby physical things, like a de facto Local Area Network. But your sensory LAN connection only extends as far as your line of sight. It’s nothing compared to a Wi-Fi internet connection.

In the future of the internet of things, Wi-Fi is going to be everywhere, and the internet will connect you to every person and thing on the planet via transportation, teleportation and telepresence. A trillion wormholes will let you reach out from anywhere on earth and hug your loved ones, or try on a new pair of shoes, or unlock your bike.

In the future beyond the internet of things, all your senses will be wired directly into the internet’s wormholes, and you’ll be completely indifferent to the location of your physical body. When you look around you, you won’t be looking into a nearby region of space. You’ll be surfing an internet that annihilates all time and space – the internet of everything."

Saranne Davies's curator insight, December 3, 2013 4:09 AM

An interesting thought.

Nacho Vega's curator insight, December 3, 2013 4:29 PM

Interesting #concept...

Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Biomimetic Design
Scoop.it!

Frogs for wireless networks

Frogs for wireless networks | evolution numérique | Scoop.it

Males of the Japanese tree frog have learnt not to use their calls at the same time so that the females can distinguish between them. Scientists at the Polytechnic University of Catalonia have used this form of calling behaviour to create an algorithm that assigns colours to network nodes – an operation that can be applied to developing efficient wireless networks.


Via David Sánchez
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Science News
Scoop.it!

Hidden Smiles and the Desire of a Conscious Machine

Hidden Smiles and the Desire of a Conscious Machine | evolution numérique | Scoop.it

If a computer can predict that someone was feeling frustrated correctly while another human gets it wrong then surely the computer is in some way better at understanding the frustration of the subject?


Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Augmented Collective Intelligence
Scoop.it!

Artificial Intelligence Versus Collective Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence Versus Collective Intelligence | evolution numérique | Scoop.it

A short slideshow about the difference between artificial and augmented intelligence and the "glacial pace of AI" compared to the web. Also to consider: AI + CI (Google's PageRank, for example) -- Howard

 

 


Via Howard Rheingold
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

The Strange Neuroscience of Immortality

The Strange Neuroscience of Immortality | evolution numérique | Scoop.it

In the basement of the Northwest Science Building here at Harvard University, a locked door is marked with a pink and yellow sign: "Caution: Radioactive Material." Inside researchers buzz around wearing dour expressions and plastic gloves. Among them is Kenneth Hayworth. He's tall and gaunt, dressed in dark-blue jeans, a blue polo shirt, and gray running shoes. He looks like someone who sleeps little and eats less.

Hayworth has spent much of the past few years in a windowless room carving brains into very thin slices. He is by all accounts a curious man, known for casually saying things like, "The human race is on a beeline to mind uploading: We will preserve a brain, slice it up, simulate it on a computer, and hook it up to a robot body." He wants that brain to be his brain. He wants his 100 billion neurons and more than 100 trillion synapses to be encased in a block of transparent, amber-colored resin—before he dies of natural causes.

Why? Ken Hayworth believes that he can live forever.

But first he has to die.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

Seth Lloyd on Programming the Universe

Seth Llyod is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His talk, "Programming the Universe", is about the computational power of atoms, electrons, and elementary particles.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Gecko-inspired adhesives helps humans to climb glass walls and may provide a better grip for robotic arms

Gecko-inspired adhesives helps humans to climb glass walls and may provide a better grip for robotic arms | evolution numérique | Scoop.it

Forget Spider-man, and meet Geckoman. Researchers at Stanford University have created a gecko-inspired human climbing system that allowed a grad student to scale a glass wall using two hand-sized sticky pads. The researchers, led by engineer Mark Cutkosky, also hope to use the adhesives in manufacturing equipment, making grippers for manipulating huge solar panels, displays, and other objects without the need for suction power or chemical glues. The team is also working with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to adapt the adhesive for use by robots.

 

Gecko toes are incredibly sticky because they are covered with groups of long, thin spatula-shaped structures called setae that increase surface area and amplify weak electrical attractions between the toes and a surface. Gecko feet stick well but are readily released when the animal shifts its weight; and of course, they can stick again and again, unlike most man-made adhesive tapes.

 

Researchers have made various artificial adhesives that work the same way, using clusters of carbon nanotubes or microscale wedges of molded rubber to mimic the high surface area of the setae on gecko feet. But these mechanisms have only worked well for small weights. Carrying larger weights requires materials with larger surface areas.

 

Using previous materials, a 70 kilogram human would require gecko-foot-like pads 10 times larger than a normal human hand in order to scale a wall. “Scaling gecko adhesion is a challenge,” says Cutkosky.

 

In 2015, the United States Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) announced that its Z-Man program had, for the first time, made a gecko-adhesive-based climbing system that enabled a person to scale a wall. Although DARPA didn’t provide details on how this was accomplished, the Stanford group, which participated in the Z-Man work, has made a similar demonstration using its own adhesive system. The work is described in research published today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface.

 

To make the climbing system, the researchers started with an existing adhesive based on molded microwedges made from a polymer material called PDMS. They attached tiles of this material to a flat, hexagonal, hand-sized gripper. Each gripper was backed with a spring that distributed weight across the pad, and absorbed some of the force involved in climbing. To make climbing easier, the researchers also linked the grippers to platform for a person’s feet, thereby transferring the work of climbing to the legs.

 

Jeffrey Karp, a bioengineer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, notes that the test situation involved a very smooth, clean, flat surface. Karp, who cofounded a company called Gecko Biomedical to commercialize a bioinspired surgical adhesive, says the Stanford researchers will need to show that their system works in less ideal environments. In the real world, a climbing system is liable to be exposed to humidity, rain, pollen, dust, and other contaminants, he notes.

 

The Stanford group hopes to test the adhesive in especially extreme conditions. This month they tested it in a zero-gravity airplane with NASA and found that it still worked.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Lucile Debethune's insight:

l'homme augmenté pourra bientot grimper sur des surfaces verticales.. avec le même système que les gecko (de petites impulsions electrique, de très grande surfaces adhésives, et une capacité à faire passer la charge d'un endroit à l'autre facilement, et de manière quasi illimité . Waow

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Removing the brake: How to increase brain activity and memory

Removing the brake: How to increase brain activity and memory | evolution numérique | Scoop.it

Is it possible to rapidly increase (or decrease) the amount of information the brain can store? A new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) suggests is may be. Their research has identified a molecule that improves brain function and memory recall is improved. Published in the latest issue of Cell Reports, the study has implications for neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, such as autism spectral disorders and Alzheimer’s disease.


“Our findings show that the brain has a key protein called FXR1P (Fragile X Related Protein 1) that limits the production of molecules necessary for memory formation,” says RI-MUHC neuroscientist Keith Murai, the study’s senior author and Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University. “When this brake-protein is suppressed, the brain is able to store more information.”


Murai and his colleagues used a mouse model to study how changes in brain cell connections produce new memories. When FXR1P was selectively removed from certain parts of the brain, new molecules were produced. They strengthened connections between brain cells, which correlated with improved memory and recall in the mice.


“The role of FXR1P was a surprising result,” says Dr. Murai. “Previous to our work, no-one had identified a role for this regulator in the brain. Our findings have provided fundamental knowledge about how the brain processes information. We’ve identified a new pathway that directly regulates how information is handled and this could have relevance for understanding and treating brain diseases.” 


“Future research in this area could be very interesting,” he adds. “If we can identify compounds that control the braking potential of FXR1P, we may be able to alter the amount of brain activity or plasticity. For example, in autism, one may want to decrease certain brain activity and in Alzheimer’s disease, we may want to enhance the activity. By manipulating FXR1P, we may eventually be able to adjust memory formation and retrieval, thus improving the quality of life of people suffering from brain diseases.” 



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Lucile Debethune's insight:

Parmi les nombreuses proteines du cerveau, cette recherche se concentre sur la proteines FXR1P, qui agit comme un frein à la production de molécule nécessaire à la formation de molécules. Travailler sur cette protéine pourait être un élément clef dans le traitement du fonctionnement anormal du cerveau.

more...
Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, November 17, 2014 4:28 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Diane Johnson's curator insight, November 18, 2014 9:21 AM

NGSS includes opportunities for students to understand and apply learning about information processing in biological systems

Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

Brain Implants: The Laser Eye Surgery of the Future?

Brain Implants: The Laser Eye Surgery of the Future? | evolution numérique | Scoop.it

Brain implants today are where laser eye surgery was several decades ago, fraught with risk, applicable only to a narrowly defined set of patients – but a sign of things to come. 


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
aanve's curator insight, March 20, 2014 3:34 AM
www.aanve.com
zwilenkosi's curator insight, March 25, 2014 2:41 PM

new brain implants that could revive your memory and makes you to learn things fast.

 

Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Stem-Cell Therapy for Blindness Is Moving Towards Clinical Trials

Stem-Cell Therapy for Blindness Is Moving Towards Clinical Trials | evolution numérique | Scoop.it
Advanced Cell Technology is testing a stem-cell treatment for blindness that could preserve vision and potentially reverse vision loss.

 

A new treatment for macular degeneration is close to the next stage of human testing—a noteworthy event not just for the millions of patients it could help, but for its potential to become the first therapy based on embryonic stem cells.

 

This year, the Boston-area company Advanced Cell Technology plans to move its stem-cell treatment for two forms of vision loss into advanced human trials. The company has already reported that the treatment is safe (see “Eye Study Is a Small but Crucial Advance for Stem-Cell Therapy”), although a full report of the results from the early, safety-focused testing has yet to be published. The planned trials will test whether it is effective. The treatment will be tested both on patients with Stargardt’s disease (an inherited form of progressive vision loss that can affect children) and on those with age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss among people 65 and older.

 

Although complete data from the trials of ACT’s treatments have yet to be published, the company has reported impressive results with one patient, who recovered vision after being deemed legally blind. Now the company plans to publish the data from two clinical trials taking place in the U.S. and the E.U. in a peer-reviewed academic journal. Each of these early-stage trials includes 12 patients affected by either macular degeneration or Stargardt’s disease.

 

The more advanced trials will have dozens of participants, says ACT’s head of clinical development, Eddy Anglade. If proved safe and effective, the cellular therapy could preserve the vision of millions affected by age-related macular degeneration. By 2020, as the population ages, nearly 200 million people worldwide will have the disease, estimate researchers. Currently, there are no treatments available for the most common form, dry age-related macular degeneration.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Lucile Debethune's insight:

Je m'éloigne un peu des sujets de cybernétique mais pas si loin, car la bioingénierie est aussi un moyen technologique de modifier l'humain. Les cellules souches sont reprogrammes depuis quelques années, et on peut asssister à des sauts technologiques de plus en plus important, notamment avec l'utilisation de technologies comme les imprimantes 3D pour recréer des organes, gerer les relation avec des prothèses bioméchaniques, etc... 

Aun iveau de la vision plusieurs grands axes émergent, soit avec un "remède" comme ici (surtout face à la dégénration cellulaire due à certaines maladie ou à la vieillesse), soit avec des prothèses de plus en plus miniaturisées et reliées au cerveau. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lucile Debethune
Scoop.it!

How does my brain work?

How does my brain work? | evolution numérique | Scoop.it
How exactly does the brain -- a 3-pound snarl of nervous tissue -- create inspired inventions, the feeling of hunger, the experience of beauty, the sense of self? Researchers at the edge of science explain …
Lucile Debethune's insight:

Une video TED qui permet d'en savoir plus sur le cerveau

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

AIXI: To create a super-intelligent machine, start with an equation

AIXI: To create a super-intelligent machine, start with an equation | evolution numérique | Scoop.it
Intelligence is a very difficult concept and, until recently, no one has succeeded in giving it a satisfactory formal definition.

 

Most researchers have given up grappling with the notion of intelligence in full generality, and instead focus on related but more limited concepts – but Marcus Hutter argues that mathematically defining intelligence is not only possible, but crucial to understanding and developing super-intelligent machines. From this, his research group has even successfully developed software that can learn to play computer games from scratch.

 

But first, how do we define "intelligence"? Hutter's group has sifted through the psychology, philosophy and artificial intelligence literature and searched for definitions individual researchers and groups came up with. The characterizations are very diverse, but there seems to be a recurrent theme which we have aggregated and distilled into the following definition: Intelligence is an agent's ability to achieve goals or succeed in a wide range of environments.

 

The emerging scientific field is called universal artificial intelligence, with AIXI being the resulting super-intelligent agent. AIXI has a planning component and a learning component. The goal of AIXI is to maximise its reward over its lifetime – that's the planning part.

 

In summary, every interaction cycle consists of observation, learning, prediction, planning, decision, action and reward, followed by the next cycle. If you're interested in exploring further, AIXI integrates numerous philosophical, computational and statistical principles:

 

• Ockham's razor (simplicity) principle for model selection

• Epicurus principle of multiple explanations as a justification of model

   averaging

• Bayes rule for updating beliefs

• Turing machines as universal description language

• Kolmogorov complexity to quantify simplicity

• Solomonoff's universal prior, and

• Bellman equations for sequential decision making.

 

AIXI's algorithm rigorously and uniquely defines a super-intelligent agent that learns to act optimally in arbitrary unknown environments. One can prove amazing properties of this agent – in fact, one can prove that in a certain sense AIXI is the most intelligent system possible. Note that this is a rather coarse translation and aggregation of the mathematical theorems into words, but that is the essence.

 

Since AIXI is incomputable, it has to be approximated in practice. In recent years, we have developed various approximations, ranging from provably optimal to practically feasible algorithms.

 

The point is not that AIXI is able to play these games (they are not hard) – the remarkable fact is that a single agent can learn autonomously this wide variety of environments. AIXI is given no prior knowledge about these games; it is not even told the rules of the games! It starts as a blank canvas, and just by interacting with these environments, it figures out what is going on and learns how to behave well. This is the really impressive feature of AIXI and its main difference to most other projects.

 

Even though IBM Deep Blue plays better chess than human Grand Masters, it was specifically designed to do so and cannot play Jeopardy. Conversely, IBM Watson beats humans in Jeopardy but cannot play chess – not even TicTacToe or Pac-Man. AIXI is not tailored to any particular application. If you interface it with any problem, it will learn to act well and indeed optimally.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

How do neurons connect to each others? Blue Brain Project opens new insights.

One of the greatest challenges in neuroscience is to identify the map of connections between neurons. In a landmark paper published in PNAS, the EPFL's Blue Brain Project (BBP) has identified key principles that determine synapse-scale connectivity by virtually reconstructing a cortical microcircuit and comparing it to a mammalian sample.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
Christian Garza's comment, September 19, 2012 12:46 AM
interesting
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Exploration de données
Scoop.it!

[Report] The Future of Big Data | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

[Report] The Future of Big Data | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project | evolution numérique | Scoop.it

Big Data: Experts say new forms of information analysis will help people be more nimble and adaptive, but worry over humans’ capacity to understand and use these new tools well.

Tech experts believe the vast quantities of data that humans and machines will be creating by the year 2020 could enhance productivity, improve organizational transparency, and expand the frontier of the “knowable future.” But they worry about “humanity’s dashboard” being in government and corporate hands and they are anxious about people’s ability to analyze it wisely.


Via cyberlabe
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

Virginia Tech: RoboJelly

Researchers at Virginia Tech and the University of Texas at Dallas built Robojelly from materials known as shape-memory alloys, which return to their original shape when bent. Eight moving segments wrapped in carbon nanotubes and coated with a platinum powder replicate the jellyfish's natural opening-and-closing method of propulsion.


Via ddrrnt, Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lucile Debethune
Scoop.it!

SAP Predictive Intelligence: Transforming the Future with Insight Today - BI Innovations Webcast

SAP Predictive Intelligence: Transforming the Future with Insight Today - BI Innovations Webcast | evolution numérique | Scoop.it

I attended an SCN SAP Predictive Analysis and SAP Visual Intelligence Webcast  yesterday.  First up was SAP Visual Intelligence (#SAPVisi hashtag) which I wrote about yesterday here. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lucile Debethune from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

The 'intelligence explosion'

Dr Anders Sandberg from Oxford University's future think-tank explains how a human cyborg world would work.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
No comment yet.