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Real Estate Lawyer On San Francisco's Housing Crisis

The dizzying cost of rent and the spike in no-fault evictions is the talk of the town in San Francisco. Real-estate lawyer Daniel Bornstein specializes in helping landlords evict tenants. AJ+ asks him why there's a housing crisis and who's to blame.

Download the AJ+ app at http://www.ajplus.net/

Subscribe for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV3Nm...

Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

Watch Daniel Bornstein's insights on the San Francisco Housing Crisis and how it relates to the typewriter's demise. 

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Former tenants sue after SRO housing made into group apartments

Former tenants sue after SRO housing made into group apartments | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
Like other tenants that a fire displaced from a single-room-occupancy hotel on Folsom Street, Patricia Kirkbride, under the San Francisco rent-control ordinance was entitled to...
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

Tenants are suing owners and management companies for eviction displacement in SF. If you are being sued or fear you may be, please contact us for assistance!  

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HomeAway lawsuit alleges Airbnb law unconstitutional and discriminatory

HomeAway lawsuit alleges Airbnb law unconstitutional and discriminatory | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
San Francisco's drama surrounding a law legalizing short-term rentals only increased Monday when one lodging company filed a federal lawsuit to block it from going...
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

"It is shocking the Supervisors passed a law that, in our opinion, stifles opportunity in such a discriminatory manner," Carl Shepherd, co-founder of HomeAway, 

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Rents are soaring, so are evictions!

Rents are soaring, so are evictions! | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it

In cities across the United States, millions of people will be kicked out of their homes this year. Some can't afford their soaring rent, others are getting evicted over minor violations by landlords eager to get higher paying tenants in place. 

Rents have risen 7% in the past year, while incomes have inched just 1.8% higher -- making it that much harder for people to afford their housing payments. In fact, the average renter now spends 30% of their income on rent, up from a longtime average of about 25%, according to Zillow.

One big emergency or unexpected expense and it can mean a missed payment -- and an eviction notice.

The Neighborhood Law Clinic at the University of Wisconsin Law School estimates that several million families a year face evictions nationwide. In Milwaukee County alone, eviction notices were up by about 10% in 2013. Statewide, they've risen 10 years straight to about 28,000 a year.

Related: 10 hottest housing markets for 2014

In Georgia, there was one eviction notice filed for every five rental households, more than 200,000 total filings last year. Many cases involved renters who were unable to keep up with rent increases.

Most evictions from Baltimore's public housing are for just causes like failing to pay rent, hoarding and noise complaints, said Shawn Boehringer, chief counsel at Maryland Legal Aid. But other evictions are occurring as some subsidized, low-income buildings are being converted into middle-income or luxury housing.

For the displaced, it can be a long road back. Once renters are out, most landlords don't want them. They often wind up in substandard housing with leaky roofs, broken windows, rodent infestations and no heat, said Boehringer. "It's a tremendous hardship for them."

Even for the solidly middle class, evictions can force families out of familiar neighborhoods and make it harder to rent new homes.

Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

As the San Francisco economy picks up speed related to new tech jobs, more people are being displaced and out-priced. 

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SF’s new law requiring landlords to pay for evictions struck down

SF’s new law requiring landlords to pay for evictions struck down | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
In a victory for property owners, a federal judge on Tuesday struck down a San Francisco law that substantially increased the relocation fees landlords must pay the tenants they evict when they go out of the rental business. The law, which took effect in June, requires property owners to pay displaced tenants the difference for two years between the current rent and the amount needed to rent a comparable unit in the city at market rates â€" more than $100,000 in most cases. A property owner d
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

BREAKING NEWS: "A victory for property owners, a federal judge on Tuesday struck down a San Francisco law that substantially increased the relocation fees landlords must pay the tenants they evict when they go out of the rental business." 

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Does S.F. have an eviction crisis? The numbers say NO!

Does S.F. have an eviction crisis? The numbers say NO! | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it

Barely a week goes by without a heart-tugging — and politically loaded — eviction story.

A family in Chinatown is dumped on the sidewalk after decades in a small apartment. A 98-year-old woman is reportedly told to leave her Dolores Street apartment by an investment firm. An artist in the Mission is ousted via the Ellis Act, a state law that often paves the way from rentals to high-priced for-sale units.

The eviction stories cast a hard light on the city’s rising housing costs, and there’s no sugar-coating these sad cases. Fear of displacement can inflict genuine stress on those left to wonder, “Will I be next?” For all the anxiety, however, evictions may not be as prevalent as the public thinks.

The city has a total of 376,942 living units, with 222,165 of them rentals, according to census figures. The city’s rent control law covers approximately 171,000 units, or nearly half of the housing totals, with the rest owner-occupied or exempt from controls.

In 2013, as the city’s economic good times grew, 1,977 evictions were filed with the Rent Board, an increase of 13 percent from the year before. The number of other eviction cases filed in court shrank slightly, from 3,695 in 2012 to 3,423 in 2013, according to Superior Court filings.

Adding the Rent Board and court figures for the past year produces an eviction rate of 3 percent of all rent-controlled units, the primary resource that housing advocates most want to protect. Citywide, the eviction rate amounts to just under 1.5 percent of San Francisco’s housing. In addition, it’s not known how many of cases were dropped or led to an actual ouster.

The city has a housing shortage, leaving few choices and high costs, but it’s hard to call a low-single-digit eviction rate a crisis.

There’s another level to consider. The Ellis Act is regarded as the nuclear option in the housing world, striking justifiable fear in worried tenants. The state law, which San Francisco lawmakers have repeatedly tried to soften, allows a landlord to withdraw units from the rental business. It’s generally a first step before cashing out by selling the units as tenancies in common or condos at prices out of reach for existing tenants.

Ellis Act totals rose by a dramatic 86 percent over the past year, according to Rent Board figures. But that number equates to 216 units, a drop in the city’s rental bucket, and fourth on the list of eviction causes tracked by the Rent Board."

Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

SF city has a housing shortage, leaving few choices and high costs, but it’s hard to call a low-single-digit eviction rate a crisis.

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Mark Leno on SF Proposition G: Stop Evictions or Housing taX?

Mark Leno on SF Proposition G: Stop Evictions or Housing taX? | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
Ellis Act evictions are up 170 percent and real estate speculators are gaming our housing market to make huge short-term profits by displacing our residents and driving up housing costs for everyone. G is a sensible use of tax policy to encourage the stability of our communities in San Francisco. The goal is to discourage speculators from buying properties and then quickly selling them for big profits. The people of San Francisco should be able to stop speculators from driving up housing prices. Together we can help stabilize housing costs and keep San Francisco as a place welcome to all.
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

Stop the Housing Tax - Vote NO on Proposition G this fall. 

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October trial set for challenge by landlords to SF eviction law

October trial set for challenge by landlords to SF eviction law | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
The ordinance, which took effect in June, requires property owners to pay displaced tenants the difference between their current rent and the amount needed to rent a similar unit at market rates for two years. [...] property owners and the San Francisco Apartment Association argued in a suit filed last month that the new law conflicts with the Ellis Act and is an unconstitutional interference with property rights.
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

A federal judge has scheduled a trial Oct. 6 on a challenge by landlords to San Francisco's ordinance that increases the amounts they must pay to tenants who are evicted when a landlord goes out of the rental business.

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S.F. apartment building locked in tenant eviction legal battle

S.F. apartment building locked in tenant eviction legal battle | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it

Ten steadfast tenants are locked in a legal battle with the owner of one of the most expensive apartment buildings in San Francisco.

On Oct. 6, a judge will hear arguments on the case involving the remaining residents at the Park Lane apartments at 1100 Sacramento St., according to a story on sfist.com.

The tenants are fighting the eviction orders they received from Flynn Investments, the building's owner. The tenants have been ordered to leave by Oct. 24. 2014. 

Flynn Investments bought Park Lane Residences at 1100 Sacramento St. in San Francisco with the plan of pumping $20 million into the property and selling the former apartments as the city's most luxurious and expensive tenancies-in-common. Flynn engaged architects Michael Harris and Greta Carlstrom Design and contractor Stephenson Construction to work on the 33-unit building. The result has been a big payoff with units selling for $2 million to $4 million so far.

Flynn Investments purchased the 33-unit apartment tower in 2011 for $35 million. The firm has done $20 million in renovations, including new kitchens, elevators and plumbing.

At least 15 units have reportedly been sold for between $2 million and $4 million.

The tenants say they are owed compensation under new city rules that took effect on June 1. They say those regulations require landlords to pay evicted tenants relocation allowances equivalent to the difference between current rent and the rent they would pay in a similar apartment for two years, a requirement sflist.com estimates could cost the building owner more than $1 million.


Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

A relocation allowance battle started by the tenants after being sold! These are exactly the type of Landlord-Tenant disputes we handle our clients!

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Mayor Ed Lee announces city loan program to combat evictions

Mayor Ed Lee announces city loan program to combat evictions | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
To address one of the most pressing issues facing San Francisco, Mayor Ed Lee announced Monday a city-loan program for nonprofits or property owners to...
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

"the program will "help stabilize what's happening in some of our neighborhoods where long-term rent-control apartments are under challenge by speculators that are buying it up at extreme prices." 


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Campos Wants San Francisco to Regulate Tenant Buyouts by Landlords

Campos Wants San Francisco to Regulate Tenant Buyouts by Landlords | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
Proposed ordinance would reveal true scope of renters' displacement by tracking payments to tenants.
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

“We just believe that two individuals have a right to make a contract between one another,”  Learn more watch our video: http://youtu.be/FNSJHe4k89E

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San Francisco Protesters Are Slapping Neon Green Stickers On Airbnb Rentals

San Francisco Protesters Are Slapping Neon Green Stickers On Airbnb Rentals | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it

ProThey say San Francisco's North Beach neighborhood is losing housing to homemade hotels

Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

Protestors are out in SF pasting stickers on homes that rent via Airbnb, a new bold technique!

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SPOSF Files Suit in Response to Sup. Campos Ellis Relocation Payment Legislation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SMALL PROPERTY OWNERS OF SAN FRANCISCO INSTITUTE JOINS LAWSUIT OPPOSING INCREASED ELLIS ACT RELOCATION PAYMENTS


July 24, 2014 – San Francisco – Today, the Small Property Owners of San Francisco Institute joined local property owners in filing a lawsuit against the City and County of San Francisco. The lawsuit challenges a new ordinance that dramatically increases relocation payments that landlords must give to tenants who are lawfully evicted under the state’s Ellis Act. 
The new ordinance, San Francisco Ordinance No. 54-14, was introduced in February 2014 by Supervisors David Campos, Jane Kim, John Avalos, and Eric Mar.The ordinance passed on April 22and became law. 
Under the ordinance, each relocated tenant will be entitled to the greater of either: a) the existing statutory relocation payment (currently $5,265.10 per tenant up to a maximum of $15,795.27 per unit, plus an additional $3,510.06 for each elderly or disabled tenant), or b) the difference between the tenant's current rent and the prevailing market rent for a comparable apartment, multiplied over a two year period. 
Example: A 35-year-old tenant is evicted from a rent-controlled apartment in Russian Hill. His current rent is $1,000 per month. Market rents for comparable units are $4,000. The relocation payment would be the higher of a) the existing statutory relocation payment of $5,265.10, or b) $72,000 (the difference between the tenant’s current rent and the prevailing market rent ($4,000 minus $1,000) multiplied by 24 months). 
The Ellis Act is a state law that guarantees property owners’ right to go out of the rental business. The new ordinance’s payments effectively prohibit evictions under the Ellis Act, which is illegal under state law. Moreover, the new ordinance’s requirements will be applied retroactively, so a property owner who began an Ellis Act eviction under the old law will now be required to pay dramatically more money to her tenants than she expected. 
The Small Property Owners of San Francisco Institute is represented by the law firm of Zacks & Freedman, P.C. A copy of the new ordinance is available at http://zulpc.com/ordinance54-14. More information about the lawsuit is available atwww.zulpc.com.


Small Property Owners of San Francisco Institute (SPOSFI)
Founded in 1998, SPOSFI provides owners of small rental properties in San Francisco the tools and information necessary to conduct business successfully in the changing marketplace. Through education programs, publications and workshops, SOPOSFI helps 2,000 members understand their rights and obligations, how to work constructively with government officials, and how to deal effectively with their tenants. SPOSFI is a non- profit organization with a volunteer board. For more information, call (415) 647-2419 or visit  www.smallprop.org.

Small Property Owners of San Francisco
P.O. Box 170669
San Francisco, CA 94117-0669
(415) 647-2419
info@smallprop.org
www.smallprop.org

Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

lawsuit challenges a new ordinance that dramatically increases relocation payments that landlords must give to tenants who are lawfully evicted under the state’s Ellis Act. 

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Opinion: Ellis Act law likely to be a big issue

"The Ellis Act has been California law for nearly 30 years, a major milestone in the recurrent political conflict over landlord-tenant relations – and changing it likely will be an issue when the Legislature reconvenes in December.

The law, passed in 1985 and named for Jim Ellis, the San Diego state senator who carried it, overturned a decision by the state Supreme Court, then headed by Chief Justice Rose Bird.

The court upheld a Santa Monica city ordinance requiring landlords to get permission from a city board before demolishing rental units.

The Ellis Act specifically allows evictions when landlords “go out of business,” thus allowing their units to be razed or converted into condominiums. And a decade later, it was expanded to allow rents to be raised on vacant units, regardless of local rent control laws.

Renter advocacy groups have long chafed at the law, but the heat was turned up when San Francisco’s landlords, responding to high demand for housing by affluent high-tech workers, began evicting renters to cash in on the soaring condominium market.

San Francisco tried to counter Ellis Act provisions with local ordinances imposing additional conditions on landlords, and local legislators introduced two bills to change the law itself.

Both anti-Ellis Act efforts met fierce opposition from property rights and landlord groups, and to date, both have failed.

Sen. Mark Leno and Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, both San Francisco Democrats, introduced Ellis Act amendment measures. Ammiano’s didn’t get out of the Assembly. Leno’s made it out of the Senate on its second try, only to die in the Assembly.

The Leno bill, aimed at speculators who buy apartment houses and then immediately evict tenants for condo conversions, would have barred such flips in the first five years of ownership.

Stymied in the Legislature, San Francisco’s Ellis Act critics turned back to a city ordinance saying that landlords would have to compensate evicted tenants by paying the differences between their current rents and the costs of renting replacement housing for two years – $100,000 or more in most cases.

Landlords filed suit, and in late October, a federal judge declared that the ordinance is an unconstitutional violation of property rights because it forces property owners to compensate for housing market forces over which they have no control.

The decision is likely to be appealed, and tenant advocates, who have support in San Francisco’s city government, are likely to renew their pitch to the Legislature for changing the Ellis Act.

Superficially, one might think that a Legislature dominated by liberal Democrats would be receptive to their pleas. But even the most liberal legislators must contend with well-organized landlords, especially small operators whose apartment houses are their pensions.


Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

"Changing it (the Ellis Act) likely will be an issue when the Sacramento Legislature reconvenes in December." - Dan Walters, Sacramento Bee

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Alert: Be Aware of a SF New Tenant Buy-Out Law!

Alert: Be Aware of a SF New Tenant Buy-Out Law! | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it

There's a new rule in town about tenant buyouts.

Whether you’re a tenant or a landlord in San Francisco, you’re going to want to learn more about the proposed Tenant Buyout Agreements ordinance. SocketSite has posted seven key points that you’ll want to review.

Keep in mind that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. This new law will likely lead to more Ellis Act evictions, which could become the more appealing, less complicated alternative. The net effect will be less rental housing stock. It’s been passed by the Board of Supervisors, but not yet signed by the mayor.

San Francisco Supervisors Avalos, Campos, Kim and Mar are sponsoring the ordinance, with Farrell dissenting in committee. The ordinance will:

1) Require notice prior to any negotiation. Landlords will be required to provide tenants with written notice of their rights and file a Rent Board form indicating which rental unit could be the subject for the negotiations.

2) Require written agreements. All buyout agreements must be in writing and include tenant-rights provisions.

3) Provide a 45-day recission period for tenants. Tenants may rescind a buyout agreement for up to 45 days after execution.

4) Require buyout agreements to be filed with the city and made public. Landlords will be required to file copies of buyout agreements with the Rent Board along with paying a filing fee.

5) Require an annual reporting of all buyouts. The Rent Board would be required to provide an annual report to the Board of Supervisors.

6) Provide for penalties for non-compliance. These would be both monetary and civil.

7) Prohibit condo conversions for buyout-emptied units. This holds for buyout agreements signed after October 2014.

Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

Are you aware of the new SF Landlord-Tenant Law regarding reporting buy-outs and "Surrender of Possession Agreements?"

Visit sfbuyout.com to learn more!

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Anti-speculation tax rejected by SF voters

Anti-speculation tax rejected by SF voters | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it

San Francisco voters sided with real estate interests Tuesday in rejecting the anti-speculation tax that tenant advocates said was needed to reduce evictions.

One of a series of measures the Board of Supervisors have pursued to address the rise in housing costs and evictions, Proposition G, or the anti-speculation tax, was a levy on the sale of certain multiunit residential properties if sold within five years of purchase.

The tax would have gradually lowered over time. If the property was sold within the first year of purchase, the levy would have been 24 percent of the sale price. The tax does not apply to buildings with more than 30 units nor single-family homes or condos. The measure was placed on the ballot by supervisors John Avalos, David Campos, Jane Kim and Eric Mar and drew the support of state Sen. Mark Leno and Assemblyman Tom Ammiano.

Quintin Mecke, who ran the Proposition G campaign, said that even though they lost the amount of support they did receive – and that was without Mayor Ed Lee’s support, he noted – proves that “there is a desire for change in the city. It shows the winds of change are blowing in our direction.”

He noted that real estate interests outspent his campaign 12 to 1, having raised nearly $2 million to defeat the measure. Mecke said that those involved in the campaign will continue to fight, perhaps moving forward with a similar measure next November. “Until we see evictions and affordability addressed positively we’re going to continue to keep going,” Mecke said.

Proponents said the measure would have helped curb real estate speculation where buildings are purchased, tenants evicted and then the property is sold for a profit. But opponents cast the measure as an unfair tax that wouldn't address the core problem, which is the shortage of housing.

Between March and February, there were 1,977 evictions reported to the Rent Board, up from the previous year's 1,757, a 13 percent increase. That includes 216 Ellis Act evictions, up from last year's 116. The Ellis Act is a state law allowing the eviction of tenants if the building owner takes the property off the rental market.

Analysis by the city controller estimated that in a typical year about 60 properties would have been impacted by the tax with an average tax of $413,000.

Another housing measure on the ballot related to Mayor Ed Lee's ambitious goal of constructing or rehabilitating 30,000 by 2020, his main effort to address the challenges of rising rents and evictions, passed on Tuesday.

Proposition K grew out of a debate over whether to mandate that 30 percent of all new construction must be offered at below market rate, but due to opposition it was dropped and instead Prop. K was born. It's a policy statement that more than 50 of the new units be affordable for middle-class households and at least 33 percent affordable for low- and moderate-income households.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

Prop. G aka the Anti-Speculation Tax was voted down by votes siding with the real estate community. Congrats to SFAR and other organizations who worked hard to fight it! Winning. 

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Is Your Halloween OK, Time to Check Your Lease?

Is Your Halloween OK, Time to Check Your Lease? | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
Ready to turn your apartment into a spooky scare den for a huge Halloween bash? Actually, you might want to hold up on turning your rented abode into a haunted home. That big costume party you’re planning and all those jack-o-lanterns you carved actually could be breaking certain terms of your lease. Dig up your …
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

Candles, fires, smoke machines... Halloween can be a recipe for problems with landlords, other tenants and safety!

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Law To Regulate Tenant Buyouts In SF: Seven Key Things To Know - SocketSite™

Law To Regulate Tenant Buyouts In SF: Seven Key Things To Know - SocketSite™ | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it

Watch the Bornstein Minute video on "How to Negotiate a Tenant Buy-out!"


With tenants in rent controlled apartments reporting offers of up to $80,000 to vacate, and unreported offers of even more, a proposed law which would require the public disclosure and tracking of all tenant buyout agreements in San Francisco, and prohibit buildings which are emptied by way of a buyout from being condo converted, could be adopted by San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors next week.

Sponsored by Supervisors Avalos, Campos, Kim and Mar, with Farrell dissenting in committee, the proposed “Tenant Buyout Agreements” ordinance would:

  1. Require notice prior to any negotiation: The proposed ordinance would require landlords to provide tenants with written notice of the tenants’ rights and file a form with the Rent Board indicating which rental unit may be the subject of the buyout negotiations prior to commencing buyout negotiations for a rental unit.  The Rent Board would make this information publicly available, except for information regarding the identity of the tenants.
  2. Require written agreements: The proposed ordinance would require all buyout agreements to be in writing and to include certain provisions regarding the tenants’ rights.
  3. Provide a 45 day rescission period for tenants: The proposed ordinance would allow tenants to rescind a buyout agreement for up to 45 days after its execution by all parties.
  4. Requite buyout agreements to filed with the city and made public : The proposed ordinance would require landlords to file copies of buyout agreements with the Rent Board and pay a filing fee. The Rent Board would create a searchable, publicly available database regarding buyout agreements.
  5. Require an annual reporting of all buyouts: The proposed ordinance would require the Rent Board to provide an annual report to the Board of Supervisors regarding tenant buyouts.
  6. Allow for monetary and civil penalties for failing to comply: The proposed ordinance would allow tenants to bring an action in San Francisco Superior Court seeking monetary damages and civil penalties from landlords who did not provide the pre-negotiation disclosure or include in the buyout agreement the provisions regarding the tenants’ rights. The proposed ordinance would authorize nonprofit tenants’ rights organizations to bring an action in San Francisco Superior Court against landlords who failed to file buyout agreements with the Rent Board.
  7. Prohibit condominium conversions for units emptied by way of a buyout: The proposed ordinance would prohibit condominium conversions in buildings where a senior, disabled, or catastrophically ill tenant has vacated a unit under a buyout agreement after October 2014. The proposed ordinance would also prohibit condominium conversions in buildings where two or more tenants who are not senior, disabled, or catastrophically ill have vacated units under buyout agreements, if the agreements were entered after October 2014 and within the ten years prior to the condominium conversion application.
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

7 Potential Ordinance changes to the SF Tenant Buy-out process now being submitted by Supes; Avalos, Campos, Kim + Mar... Stay tuned!

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Landlords Challenge SF Law - Compensates Evicted Tenants Through Relocation Fees

Landlords Challenge SF Law - Compensates Evicted Tenants Through Relocation Fees | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it

SAN FRANCISCO (KCBS)— A pair of senior citizens who live in a small home in San Francisco’s Cow Hollow neighborhood say it’s unfair that they should have to pay $117,000 to help their evicted tenant find a new place to live. They are challenging a fairly new city-wide law in federal court to prevent that from happening.

The measure went into effect June 1st and requires landlords to pay an amount equal to the difference between the tenant’s current rent and the cost of comparable housing in the city for two years.

The law was implemented to stave off the wave of Ellis Act evictions the city is experiencing where property owners are allowed by law to remove their properties from the rental market and evict the tenants who occupied those units.

“What we have put together is a pretty reasonable standard that is actually based on where the market is today,” said City Supervisor David Campos, who authored the ordinance.

Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

“What we have put together is a pretty reasonable standard that is actually based on where the market is today,” said City Supervisor David Campos, who authored the ordinance.

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As Housing Costs Soar, San Francisco Seeks Ballot Solution

As Housing Costs Soar, San Francisco Seeks Ballot Solution | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
Some owners see an increased tax on property transactions simply leading to even higher rental and sale prices.
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

San Francisco is receiving national media attention regarding legislation, evictions and housing costs! Stay tuned... we are on top of it! 

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Evictions Soar in Hot Market- NY Times

Evictions Soar in Hot Market- NY Times | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
Fueled by a growing interest in urban living and a shortage of rental housing, rents have risen sharply in cities like Milwaukee and San Francisco and in states like Maine, Georgia and Kentucky.
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

"...economic realities have affected landlords as well as tenants, pushing them to act. The landlord missed rent debt had built up to more than $5,000... “I can’t sustain this anymore,”

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Are All Landlords Who Use the Ellis Act Bad?

Are All Landlords Who Use the Ellis Act Bad? | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
Some 30 protesters marched against Leona Fong’s Ellis Act eviction of 24-year Mission resident Sergio Silva-Lainez last Saturday afternoon, visiting each of the Fong family’s eight properties in the Mission. Chants of “Hey, hey, ho, ho, the Ellis Act has got to go!” erupted from the crowd as it snaked its way through the Mission, delivering certificates of “honorary membership” to the “Mission Bad Landlord Club” at each Fong property. But are the Fongs bad landlords?  The Anti-Eviction Mapping Project’s “Dirty Dozen” list—the Fongs are not on it—is filled with serial evictors (with Ellised buildings ranging anywhere from 10 to 69) who often flip properties for a tidy profit. Other landlords have been targeted for charges that include intimidation of tenants and severe disrepair. The Fongs, on the other hand, have no noted complaints on their properties and are adamant that they plan on moving into the building themselves. They argue ...
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

The landlord issue around Ellis Act evictions is not always black or white or in this case good or bad! 

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S.F.'s answer to housing crisis: Offer loans to buy the buildings

S.F.'s answer to housing crisis: Offer loans to buy the buildings | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
Faced with waves of seniors and other vulnerable residents being evicted as their apartment buildings are sold in San Francisco's tech-fueled housing boom, the city is going to start paying so some people can stay in their homes. Mayor Ed Lee is rolling out a pilot program Monday, apparently the first in the country that will provide city loans to groups like housing nonprofits from an initial pool of $3 million to buy smaller, low-income apartment buildings. The program is designed to give nonprofits the extra boost of funding needed to compete for a building on the open market while making it financially feasible to keep rents low. Owners can make sizable profits selling their old apartment buildings, where longtime tenants are often paying below-market rents because of San Francisco's rent protections, to speculators. Glenda DeVera is surrounded by real estate signs as she stands on the sidewalk in front of the faded Edwardian that houses the one-bedroom apartment she shares with her three children on Natoma Street. Across the street, where a garage once stood, is a bank of modern condominiums the developer bills online as luxury real estate "perfectly located steps from uber-trendy SoMa restaurants" and "techie Mid-Market." DeVera, 45, a Filipina immigrant who works part time as a senior caregiver, has lived in the apartment for more than 11 years with her children: a 21-year-old son who works the night shift at Burger King, a 19-year-old son who attends City College and works part time at a Subway sandwich shop, and a 14-year-old daughter who will start her freshman year at prestigious Lowell High School this month. Other cities, including Chicago and New York, have programs in various stages of development that use taxpayer money to help buy affordable housing.
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

"There are sites that are under extreme pressure, and maybe they've been rent-control units for a long time" 

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San Francisco renters push for crackdown on illegal Airbnb rentals

San Francisco renters push for crackdown on illegal Airbnb rentals | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
Renters in San Francisco are holding protests to call for the city to crackdown on landlords who are taking advantage of the Ellis Act.
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

SF Tenants Union is now staging protests outside of SF Airbnb rental properties, where owners may have utilized the Ellis Act to convert the apts to short terms rentals!

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Airbnb squatter horror story has a Kickstarter twist

Airbnb squatter horror story has a Kickstarter twist | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
The Airbnb and Kickstarter situations underscore the tenuous nature of safeguards in emerging peer-to-peer markets, in which people trust Internet strangers based on reviews by other Internet strangers. [...] Tschogl, a San Francisco rehabilitation therapist for blind and low-vision people, is facing thousands of dollars in legal expenses and an eviction process of up to six months. Maksym Pashanin sent Tschogl texts threatening to press charges against her for blackmail, negligence and malicious misconduct, including his claims that the tap water hurt his expensive espresso machine and exacerbated his brother's ulcer, she said, providing copies of the messages. Tschogl told The Chronicle that the brothers are the renters and provided a copy of Maksym's Airbnb "verified ID" profile, in which he appears identical to the Maksym Pashanin shown in a YouTube video promoting the Kilobite game. "Like any nascent market, the sharing economy is going to generate a flurry of new laws from regulators as well as through civil litigation," said Charley Moore, CEO of San Francisco's Rocket Lawyer. Seen as donationsFor instance, Kickstarter funds are donations, and thus lack the legal protections accorded to investments, he said. Kickstarter policyAt Kickstarter, spokesman Justin Kazmark said its "Trust & Safety" pages outline how it protects the system's long-term integrity, but did not respond to requests for comments on whether the 2,386 people who put up $39,739 for "Confederate Express" could get any money back for a game that doesn't exist.
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

"Businesses like Airbnb, Uber and Kickstarter fall between the gaps of regulations and push the envelope on what is allowed."

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Bus Vandalized as Protesters in S.F., Oakland Target Silicon Valley Shuttles

Bus Vandalized as Protesters in S.F., Oakland Target Silicon Valley Shuttles | Legislation + Eviction Law News | Scoop.it
Window smashed, tires slashed in Oakland incident as total of three buses are stopped in protests.
Bornstein & Bornstein + Bay Property Group's insight:

KQED picks up the Google Bus vandalism story....

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