Everything Vocal
3 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Paul Baston
Scoop.it!

Language Log » More deceptive statements about Voice Stress Analysis

Language Log » More deceptive statements about Voice Stress Analysis | Everything Vocal | Scoop.it
Paul Baston's insight:

Your voice reveals your lies... Or does it? Very thorough examination of Voice Stress Analysis

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Baston
Scoop.it!

Why We Don't Breathe - Vocal Yoga

Why We Don't Breathe - Vocal Yoga | Everything Vocal | Scoop.it
It’s all about breath, no breath, no voice! Why Don’t We Breathe One of the greatest benefits of yoga is the deep breathing it instills. Which leads us to the question, why don’t we breathe deeply in our everyday lives? Babies and small children are natural deep breathers; however, as school begins and the stresses [...]
Paul Baston's insight:

A great reminder for the actor or voice actor - don't just get into the habit of breathing well when you're supposed to - notice yourself in daily life and get into the habit of *always* being aware of tension and breath-holding. As a voiceover artist this is a tough one for me - aren't you supposed to keep our breath away from the mic...? I guess it's about making sure it doesnt inhibit the natural inhale/exhale itself, which is really important for sounding, and feeling, genuine and natural.

 

Actor training seems to use yoga as a way of training the body but too often its vocal benefits only extend as far as warmups for the voice. Good to find another "holistic" approach I haven't come across before.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Baston
Scoop.it!

Alash - About Tuvan Throat Singing

In throat singing, a single vocalist produces two distinct pitches simultaneously. It is a musical form that has flourished for centuries in central Asia.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Baston
Scoop.it!

LA Times

Aks vs Ask

Paul Baston's insight:

Really enlightening article on the origin of "ask" pronounced as "aks". I've heard it spoken in London by loads of different ethnic groups, from Bengali to Caucasian. Never knew Chaucer used it though!

 

He draws interesting similarities with other words that had alternative pronunciations that never caught on or disappeared, sometimes thankfully. Right, I'm off to get some Fisk and Chips...!

more...
No comment yet.