Managing the Natural Environment
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Managing the Natural Environment
Resources for Senior Geography in Queensland - Theme 1 - Managing the Natural Environment
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The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle

The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
When the giant fault line along the Pacific Northwest ruptures, it could be our worst natural disaster ever.

 

The Cascadia subduction zone remained hidden from us for so long because we could not see deep enough into the past. It poses a danger to us today because we have not thought deeply enough about the future. The Cascadia situation, a calamity in its own right, is also a parable for this age of ecological reckoning, and the questions it raises are ones that we all now face. How should a society respond to a looming crisis of uncertain timing but of catastrophic proportions? How can it begin to right itself when its entire infrastructure and culture developed in a way that leaves it profoundly vulnerable to natural disaster?


Via Seth Dixon
geographynerd's insight:

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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John Flatley's curator insight, July 28, 2015 5:54 PM

A longer than normal read, but pretty un-nerving for people located in this area.  

Diane Johnson's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:33 PM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    


Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

aitouaddaC's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:42 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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Lessons from the Rock

Lessons from the Rock | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
IN THE 1978 film “Superman”, Lex Luthor, Superman’s tenacious villain, launched a nuclear missile at the San Andreas fault, which runs north to south through...
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The Anatomy of a Tornado

Jim Cantore gives an INCREDIBLE step-by-step description and 3D view into how a tornado forms - like you've never seen before!


Tags: physical, weather and climate, visualization.


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 22, 2015 7:37 PM

JIM CANTORE MUESTRA PASO A PASO EL DESARROLLO DE UN TORNADO EN 3D

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 2:41 PM

This amazing video shows everything from funnel clouds and weak tornadoes to F5, tornadoes which cause major damage. It explains how a tornado originates from a super cell (rotating thunderstorm) to how it forms from a rear flank downdraft. 

When identifying the formation of a tornado and the direction in which it will be heading, satellite imagery and aerial photography are needed for accurate data.

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India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt

India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it

"At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit).  Hospitals are on alert to treat victims of heatstroke and authorities advised people to stay indoors with no end in sight to the searing conditions.  In the worst-hit state of Andhra Pradesh, in the south, 551 people have died in the past week as temperatures hit 47 degrees Celsius on Monday." 


Tags: physical, weather and climate, India, South Asia.


Via Seth Dixon
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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 5:58 AM

People often underestimate the effects of a strong heat wave. Extremely hot temperatures can be as deadly as hurricanes and tornadoes. The temperature  in India was so hot, that the pavement on the roads actually melted. At least 800 people have died as a result of this heat wave. That number is quit shocking. India does not have the inherit infrastructure to deal with large scale disasters. The rural areas of the nation have suffered the most casualties. Those areas are also the more undeveloped areas of India. This is yet another reminder of the terror nature can inflict on the human landscape.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 1:46 PM

The reality of everyday life in the differing geographies of the world vary, especially within the vast subcontinent that is India. From the freezing plains of the north to the tropical south, India experiences a wide array of weather, some of which can be extreme. This is certainly the case in this article, where some 800+ people have perished in the extreme heat wave that has hit much of the nation. Temperatures are warmer than the seasonal norm by 12 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving many restricted to the relative comforts of their homes. Such extreme highs of 122 degrees seem unfathomable to many Americans, particularly up north. Even in Las Vegas, where I spent 3 days this summer and felt like I was slowly being cooked, was a "meager" 108 degrees. The infrastructure of the US also allows for a level of comfort in these conditions that is virtually unattainable for many citizens of India, who often lack basic plumbing, let alone air conditioning. The death tolls will only continue to rise as these conditions persist, and their frequencies will most likely increase as human-generated climate change continues to accelerate. 

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:24 PM

we really ever hear about extreme weather like this unless it affects us directly. "551 people have died in the last week" This is a state of emergency but those in the west will never hear about it. What a shame. I wonder if part of it is that politics in the west wouldn't want you hearing about this as it might support the climate change agenda.

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Why Earthquakes Are Devastating Nepal

Why Earthquakes Are Devastating Nepal | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
The May 12 7.3 magnitude aftershock was one of many that followed the April 25 earthquake that shook Nepal. Why is this part of the world such a hotbed of tectonic activity?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 13, 2015 8:11 AM

This video is in a series by National Geographic designed to show the geography behind the current events--especially geared towards understanding the physical geography.  Check out more videos in the '101 videos' series here.   

 

Tags physicalNational Geographic, tectonics, disasters, video.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 9:44 AM

Summer reading, tectonic plates

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 9:16 AM

Geography determines human activity, and not the other way around; that has been the theme of this course, and it holds true as we look at the devastating impacts of earthquakes in the nation of Nepal. Sitting right over one of the most active plate boundaries in the world, with the Indian subcontinent being violently forced under the rest of Asia, Nepal is therefore the home of both the infamous Himalayan Mountains and numerous earthquakes, varying in severity and frequency. As violent and as costly as they are, violent earthquakes are just another part of life in Nepal, as are other natural events in other parts of the globe, and the people who call it home adjust their lives accordingly, through a variety of means. However, nothing can prepare anyone for the extremes of earth's power, and the violent earthquake that shook the nation to its very core in May has left behind a great deal of human suffering and destruction. I hope that those who lost their homes and businesses are already well along on their path to recovery, although I don't think it's possible to every truly heal from such a traumatic experience, at least not completely.

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Why Do Rivers Curve? - YouTube

We're now on Patreon! Please support us at: http://www.patreon.com/minuteearth Can you find an oxbow lake in GoogleEarth? Share your findings (pictures or co...
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How 'crisis mapping' is helping relief efforts in Nepal

How 'crisis mapping' is helping relief efforts in Nepal | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
A team of Nepalis, backed by groups around the world, are helping guide what aid is needed where by "crisis mapping" Nepal, reports Saira Asher.


Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics, mapping, geospatial.


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 8, 2015 10:16 AM

Crisis are a symptom that something underneath the surface of normalcy is terribly wrong ... especially when we come to realize that everything is interconnected, even politics—worldwide.

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Journey to the Center of the Earth

Journey to the Center of the Earth | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it

"How far would you have to travel to reach the Earth’s core? And what would you see along the way? Use this BBC interactive to dig into the truth. (BBC).  Download the National Geographic Education high-resolution illustration of Earth’s interior."


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Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 30, 2015 8:17 PM

Interactive that would be great for Year 7 and 8 Science next term - moving through the layers of the Earth!

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Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped

Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
At least 970 people have died as Nepal suffered its worst earthquake for more than 80 years, with deaths also reported in India, Tibet and Bangladesh.


Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics.


Via Seth Dixon
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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 12:48 PM

We have learned that the Himalayas are growing everyday while our Appalachians in the united states are shrinking. What does this all mean? In the platonic spectrum it means in Nepal, earthquakes.

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An earthquake felt across South Asia

An earthquake felt across South Asia | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it

"The magnitude-7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal on Saturday morning destroyed parts of Kathmandu, trapped many people under rubble and killed more than 2,500 people. It was the worst to hit the country since a massive 1934 temblor killed more than 8,000."


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Joshua Mason's curator insight, April 29, 2015 11:04 AM

It's absolutely devastating what happened to Nepal. Any loss of life is a tragedy but loss of this scale is unimaginable. It's going to be a difficult rebuilding process for the Nepalese whether that's coping with the loss or physically rebuilding the nation.

 

Watching footage of shakes, what struck me the most was hundreds of year old temples crumbling. Those just aren't something you can easily rebuild. The building can eventually be replaced but the significance of it is almost lost. 

 

Those temples, like the homes in the area, were most likely not built up to a standard that could withstand earthquakes or at least earthquakes of this magnitude. It's easy to see how destruction on this scale can occur in large urban populations that were not designed to stand against such a dramatic event.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 3:59 PM

I've experienced earthquakes more times than I've ever felt the need.  We used to get them all the time it seemed in Japan.  My bed would role across the room.  It got to the point where I just slept through them.  If I had even felt a shake half as violent as what Nepal went through I could not even imagine the fright.  I wonder how long the India and Eurasia tectonic plates will stay on top of each other?  Or if a few more earth quakes will split the area?  

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 1:52 AM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)


GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

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First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga

First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it

The first photographs have emerged of a newly formed volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean after three men climbed to the peak of the land mass off the coast of Tonga. Experts believe a volcano exploded underwater and then expanded until an island formed. The island is expected to erode back into the ocean in a matter of months.


Via Seth Dixon
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Louis Mazza's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:17 AM

A new one mile island of the coast of Tonga in Oceania west coast of Australia. A volcano exploded underwater, turning lava in rock and pushing through the surface of the ocean to expose a new island. Three men have scaled the peak of the mountain to date. The men say the surface was still hot and the green lake in the crater smelt strongly of sulfur.

                This is great example of geography constantly undergoing changes and new looks and features. Officials say that this island will be eroded away within the next month so they will not even name it I wonder how many islands like this has happened to, or if inhabitants went to live there then the next day there home is underwater. This is another great example of plate tectonic and active under sea forces that we do not see with our eyes, and what most people do not think of on a daily basis, but is working on a daily basis, constantly changing geography and our world. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 9:34 PM

I just find this fascinating.  History is excellent to study but so is the watching history in the making.  This volcanic island formation off the coast of Tonga is a modern day phenomenon which will one day be history.  Some people predict it will erode back into the water but some others think it will be able to last longer.  Either way stuff like this is pretty cool to watch and study while it is happening before your very own eyes.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:20 PM

This is pretty cool that a new island is being formed, due to a volcano that erupted under water. I am sure there are many more in other places, but it is a new opportunity for life, development and travel. Although since it is new, obviously now would not be a good time because you do not want a volcano erupting on people, that would not be an ideal situation. Although, I hope to one day be able to travel to this new island to check it out. 

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Voices: From Haiti to Japan: A tale of two disaster recoveries | EARTH Magazine

Voices: From Haiti to Japan: A tale of two disaster recoveries | EARTH Magazine | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
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Ring of Fire

Ring of Fire | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
The Ring of Fire is a string of volcanoes and sites of seismic activity, or earthquakes, around the edges of the Pacific Ocean.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2015 12:20 PM

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.


Tags physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

Loreto Vargas's curator insight, July 2, 2015 10:07 AM

“El Anillo de Fuego” es una cadena de volcanes y lugares de actividad sísmica, o temblores, alrededor de los límites del Océano Pacífico.

“L’Anneau de Feu” c’est une chaine de volcans et de sites d’activité sismique, ou tremblements de terre, autour de limites de l’Océan Pacifique.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.

 

Tags: physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

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Schools reopen in earthquake-devastated Nepal

Schools reopen in earthquake-devastated Nepal | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
Thousands of children return to classes for the first time since April’s two earthquakes that left more than 8,700 people dead
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Plate Tectonics and the Formation of Central America and the Caribbean

This animation is made from a time series of maps reconstructing the movements of continental crust or blocks, as South America pulled away from North America, starting 170 million years ago. Note that South America is still clinging to Africa at the beginning of the series.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 2015 4:37 PM

The land bridge connecting North and South America is hardly permanent (on a geological time scale that is).  This video is an animated version of the still maps from this article.  


Tags: Mexico, tectonicsphysical, video, Middle America.

Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:54 AM

The intriguing thing about this video is that it puts into perspective the amount of time that humans have been on this earth. In in less than a million years we have gone from not existing to shaping the ground that we walk on.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:46 AM

Summer reading KQ1

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MinuteEarth - YouTube

MinuteEarth - YouTube | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
Science and stories about our awesome planet! Created by Henry Reich, with Alex Reich, Peter Reich, Emily Elert, Ever Salazar, and Kate Yoshida. Music by Nat...
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Claire Law's curator insight, May 16, 2015 1:23 AM

Animations on tonnes of geography topics

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BOM: We're calling it, the 2015 El Niño is here

BOM: We're calling it, the 2015 El Niño is here | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
El Niño is officially here according to the Bureau of Meteorology.
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Motion of Tectonic Plates

"This video is from the BBC documentary film Earth: The Power Of The Planet.  The clip is also embedded in this story map that tells the tale of Earth’s tectonic plates, their secret conspiracies, awe-inspiring exhibitions and subtle impacts on the maps and geospatial information we so often take for granted as unambiguous."


Tags:  physical, tectonics, disasters, mapping, geospatial, mapping, video, ESRI.


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Nepal earthquake: Rescue effort intensifies - BBC News

Nepal earthquake: Rescue effort intensifies - BBC News | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
Rescue efforts in Nepal intensify after nearly 2,000 died in the country's worst quake in more than 80 years, as a powerful aftershock hits the region.

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Earth's tectonic plates skitter about

Earth's tectonic plates skitter about | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it

"Geoscientists have unveiled a computer model that maps the details of that tectonic dance in 1-million-year increments—practically a frame-by-frame recap of geologic time. It shows that the plates speed up, slow down, and move around in unexpectedly short bursts of activity. It also suggests that researchers may have to rethink what drives much of that incessant motion.  The new model shows that although plates usually creep along at an average speed of about 4 centimeters per year, some can reach much faster speeds in short sprints. For example, India, which broke off the east coast of Africa about 120 million years and is now plowing into Asia, reached speeds as high as 20 centimeters per year for a relatively brief 10 million years."


Tags: tectonics, physical, geomorphology, video.


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 27, 2015 5:52 PM

"Los geocientíficos han dado a conocer un modelo de computadora que asigna los detalles de esa danza tectónico en 1 millón de años incrementos de una recapitulación fotograma a fotograma de tiempo geológico. Esto demuestra que las placas aceleran, frenan, y se mueven alrededor de pequeños estallidos de actividad. también sugiere que los investigadores pueden tener que repensar lo que impulsa gran parte de ese movimiento incesante. El nuevo modelo muestra que, aunque por lo general se arrastran a lo largo de las placas a una velocidad media de unos 4 centímetros por año, algunos pueden alcanzar velocidades mucho más rápidas en carreras cortas. Por ejemplo, la India, que estalló frente a la costa oriental de África a unos 120 millones de años y ahora está arando en Asia, alcanza velocidades de hasta 20 centímetros por año durante un tiempo relativamente breves 10 millones años ".

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The Science of Earthquakes

The Science of Earthquakes | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
From fault types to the Ring of Fire to hydraulic fracking, the Earthquakes infographic by Weather Underground helps us understand the complexities of what shakes the ground.

Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 8, 2015 2:37 AM

GTAV AC:G Y8 - Landforms and landscapes

CD - The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard.

Samantha Hellessey's curator insight, April 1, 12:55 AM

GTAV AC:G Y8 - Landforms and landscapes

CD - The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard.

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More than 400 dams planned for the Amazon and headwaters | David Hill

More than 400 dams planned for the Amazon and headwaters | David Hill | Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
David Hill: Rainforest under threat from a "hydrological experiment of continental proportions" as well as oil, gas and mining, says report
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