The Art of Everyday
Follow
Find
3.6K views | +0 today
The Art of Everyday
Makers who reinvent ordinary objects as art
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Shadow Sculpting « Kumi Yamashita

Shadow Sculpting « Kumi Yamashita | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Immensely talented maker Kumi Yamashita uses two of the most basic aspects of the "everyday" as mediums for her artwork: light and shadow. Born in Japan, Yamashita came to America as an exchange student while she was in high school and went on to receive a BFA from the Cornish College of the Arts in Washington State. She then entered an MFA program in fine arts at Glasgow University in Scotland. Through her training and natural gift for understanding the complex relationship between a light source and the objects with which it interacts, Yamashita has earned her reputation at the forefront of shadow sculpting.

 

"I sculpt shadow with light or sometimes light with shadow, but both function in essentially the same manner. I take objects and carve and place them in relation to a single light source. The complete artwork is therefore comprised of both the material (the solid objects) and the immaterial (the light or shadow)," she explains on her website (http://www.kumiyamashita.com/light-and-shadow/).

 

Her 2009 exhibition "Fragments", featured above, is housed in the New Mexico History Museum in Santa Fe. Here Yamashita does what she does best: makes something out of, seemingly, nothing. "Fragments" is made up of colored resin tiles onto which is cast the light of one single source. The shadows projected onto the surface are the unique profiled faces of 40 residents of New Mexico whom Yamashita encountered in her travels in the state. "It is both testament and celebration of the people whose names may never make it into the history books or history museums, but who definitely make up the rich fabric of life in a pueblo, city, county, and state," she writes.

 

In "City View" (2003), the figure of a woman's body stands straight, hands perched on a railing -- but the silhouette is created entirely in shadows formed by aluminum numbers adhered at varying angles to the wall (http://www.kumiyamashita.com/portfolio/city-view/). The captivating but mindboggling "Lovers" (1999) depicts a couple in motion, their hands nearly, but not quite, intertwined -- their shadows separated by the cut aluminum plates that form them (http://www.kumiyamashita.com/portfolio/lovers/).

 

The down-to-earth artist's response when asked in an interview with COOL blog to explain the inspiration behind her art is one we can all take to heart: "Always being happy. If I am happy, ideas naturally spring forth. The more I try to think of good ideas, the worse my work is. The times when I am making good art are the times when I am enjoying making it. If this feeling starts to crumble even a little, I stop working and do something completely different. For example, I’ll participate in a wild flower picking tour in Central Park (laughing), and find that happy feeling in another field. For me, feeling happy is normal and, at the same time, very important" (http://englishcoolny.blog.shinobi.jp/Entry/52/).

 

Video footage of the construction of Yamashita's "Dialogue" exhibition is viewable on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLMLt_7_Evs&feature=player_embedded. Her personal website is: http://www.kumiyamashita.com/.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Miniature Art « Nic Joly

Miniature Art « Nic Joly | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

The featured image here is titled "The Dream", and it measures only 30cm x 40cm framed. This small size isn't unusual within the portfolio of British sculptor Nic Joly, whose "under foot" series takes quotidian situations ranging from innocently beautiful "dreams" to quirkily unsettling "crusades", and turns our expectations for them on their heads. What, in the course of one's daily routine, may strike us as dominant and imposing, is diminutized in Joly's work -- presented in shadow boxes using a variety of refurbished found objects and painstakingly sculpted and painted miniature figurines.

 

"As we go through the journey that is our lives we come across situations, and make observations about what we see and feel. With my under foot collection I strive to highlight my own observations and thoughts about my journey, and things I have seen," shares maker Joly on the website dedicated to this project: http://www.nicjolyunderfoot.com/.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Paradoxical Art Sculptures By Nancy Fouts - webdesigner jam ...

Paradoxical Art Sculptures By Nancy Fouts - webdesigner jam ... | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Double takes are requisite when viewing the portfolio of sculptures by American-born, London-based artist Nancy Fouts. Tagged as an "Art Prankster", Fouts takes conventional expectations of an object, its purpose and relationships, and turns them completely on their heads. And that's how you get this cracked-egg shuttlecock, a dog made of its bone treats, cherry dice, a birds' wings-operated fan, a pear balloon, and a change purse with a toothy twist. They're provocative; scathing at times, playful at others. Check out these 40 sculptures, featured on BuzzFeed: http://www.buzzfeed.com/monsieurbeige/40-sculptures-from-nancy-fouts-5ej0, to indentify the paradoxes inherent in Fouts' work for yourself.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Surrealist to admire «

Surrealist to admire « | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

The work of Belgian surrealist René Magritte (1898-1967) is"mysterious and full of magic, a magic that is created by the combination of his realistic depiction of everyday objects and the discrepancy to the known, to the perception of everyday life. He diverges proportions, changes the image’s texture He combines real objects with abstract figurations."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Receipts, Email, Bread Tags, Styrofoam : Rachel Perry Welty ...

By making art throughout the course of her day and using everyday objects like receipts, bread tags, aluminum foil, and telephone messages as her medium, Welty found a way to make art in spite of her busy family schedule.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino from Art @ its best!!!
Scoop.it!

Decorative Potholes - Juliana Santacruz Herrera

Decorative Potholes - Juliana Santacruz Herrera | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Visual artist Juliana Santacruz Herrera found herself like many city dwellers: unsatisfied with the constant state of disrepair of the streets of Paris. She set out to combat the potholes using colorful scraps of fabric, braided and coiled into the cracks in the street, as seen here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/39380641@N03/.

 

Known as "yarn bombing" or "guerilla knitting", Santacruz Herrera's work brings crochet art into contact with the everyday in an aesthetically abrasive way. She combines a palette of bright colored fabrics, creating a cheery contrast to the gray asphalt of Parisian streets. However, these bursts of color throughout the city are also intended to call attention to the municipal neglect of the urban streets; a socio-political statement brought about by the eye-catching "repairwork" of an artist's touch in the everyday sphere.


Via MikAn
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino from Art @ its best!!!
Scoop.it!

Sharpie Art - Extreme Sharpie Artwork

Sharpie Art -  Extreme Sharpie Artwork | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Featured in this article from womansday.com (http://www.womansday.com/life/awesome-artwork-made-sharpies-104816) are ten exquisite works by amateur artists . . . all done using Sharpie markers! The common household permanent marker was utilized in its standard, fine-tip, and paint marker forms to create these pieces, the canvases of which range from George Ramos' entire Lamborghini, Peter Bragino's personal guitar, Jennifer Hammit's fingernails, Okat's slip-on shoes, and Charlie Kratzner's basement walls.

 

And if you enjoy those, you'll probably want to check out this gallery of spectacular Sharpie artworks made on plain styrofoam cups: http://bit.ly/LWMN6p. Sharpie features the cool art done using its products on its blog (http://blog.sharpie.com), notably the work of the Sharpie King (http://bit.ly/KySiT8), Immy Mellin. Mellin began using Sharpie markers exclusively over two decades ago, drawn to them by their color, longevity, and exactness. Describing his art as "graphic, geometric, complex, abstract, and surreal," Mellin begins with rows and lines on one sheet of paper that little by little grow and develop, expressing his own inspiration and encompassing up to tens of pages of paper, taking between one day and four years to complete.


Via MikAn
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino from Art @ its best!!!
Scoop.it!

3-D Money Sculptures - Kristi Malakoff

3-D Money Sculptures - Kristi Malakoff | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

 Aptly named "Money Pieces", this series by Canadian visual artist Kristi Malakoff capitalizes on capital. Using the U.S. dollar, Turkish lira, Euro, and a variety of world currency in between, Malakoff takes advantage of the full color spectrum that passes through our hands as paper money around the globe to create her intricate and beautiful sculptures (http://bit.ly/MTAyBZ).

 

Her process requires the money to spend more time in her hands and studio than it does in typical consumer exchanges, though, as Malakoff must take great care in the folding, cutting, and pasting of her designs. The finished pieces range from geometric displays, such as "Desert Cactus" (above, part of the Polyhedra Series), to portraits of Jamaican school children and a Nicaraguan fruit seller. These and the other "Money Pieces" can be viewed on Malakoff's website: http://www.kristimalakoff.com/Money%20Pieces.html.

 

While on her site, be sure to check out her innovative stamp sculptures (http://www.kristimalakoff.com/Stamp%20Pieces.html) - along the same vein of "Money Pieces", but featuring 3-dimensional images pulled out and propped up from within international postage stamps - and floral installations (http://www.kristimalakoff.com/Flower%20Installations.html).

 

 


Via MikAn
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Murray Guy » "From An Object's Point of View"

Murray Guy » "From An Object's Point of View" | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

The tagline for the current exhibition (running through June 30) at Murray Guy in New York reads: "Reclining, ambulating, balancing, reflecting, approaching and withdrawing, this exhibition brings together a group of objects that might propose the question:  what is it like to be a thing?"

 

Half of the pieces in the group exhibition honor American artist Robert Breer (1926-2011). Particularly notable are his "floats", sculptures made of Styrofoam, resin, or foil, that from a distance resemble more conventional metals or stones, and are powered by motors out of sight to the viewer. The simple forms move almost imperceptibly slowly across the floor of the exhibit space, until they are forced to change direction upon crashing into its confines, each other, and the other works. (Check out a YouTube clip from one of Breer's earlier exhibitions here: http://bit.ly/L3iFAm.)

 

The other artists in the exhibition seem to specialize in the animation and manipulation of everyday objects as well. Czech artist Jirí Kovanda plays with the position and interaction of familiar consumer materials in his work; such as a bag of candies suspended along a rope that extends from one room of the display to another, where a hammer is found suspended from the other end, or wooden sticks poking out from the holes of a cardboard box.

 

Photographer Mac Adams' work is likewise provocative, taking common home decor items and juxtaposing them with scenes of violence. These metallic objects - a teapot, lamp, or kitchen tray - are photographed in front of a monochromatic studio backdrop and appear innocent enough until one sees the shooting or violent assault reflected by them; a jarring depiction of the experiences to which everyday objects become unwilling witnesses.

 

"Breath on Both Sides" by Roman Ondák consists of a red balloon inflated through a small hole cut in a gallery window panel, so that one end pokes through the interior, but the other basks in natural air; a statement on the interaction of objects with their surroundings and the context of shared spaces.

 

More information on the exhibition, which runs through June 30, and the participating artists can be viewed here: http://murrayguy.com/current-exhibition/.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Allison Cortson - Dust Paintings

Allison Cortson - Dust Paintings | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

LitCouture recently highlighed the work of "Lint Lady" Slater Barron, who makes portraits and sculptures out of dryer lint. Allison Cortson is in a similar line of work, but her medium is an even less-desired household product: dust. Los Angeles-based Cortson was inspired by her realization that "matter is mostly empty space and is held together by an observer experiencing it" and decided to create portraits of people in their home environments using dust, an ephemeral and untapped artistic material that "arrives in our homes as a remnant of our own existence and degeneration from decaying particles from our bodies and objects" (http://www.allisoncortson.com/artist-statement.html).

 

The first step of her process is to photograph the subject in his or her home. Then, over the course of several months, Cortson collects the dust from that home through the subject's vacuum bags; laborious work considering that these dust paintings can be up to 70" x 100" in size! The human subjects are painted realistically using oils - to emphasize that it is their presence that renders meaning to the space and matter that surround them - and their background environments are made from the collected dust, which is sprinkled onto the canvas and positioned by Cortson using a brush. Upon completion, the dust is coated with an acrylic sealer, creating a unique portrait of a life, such as "Eric Descending the Staircase" (2011, sampled above).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Could Artify It Be The Web Evolution Of The Art Gallery? - Forbes

Could Artify It Be The Web Evolution Of The Art Gallery? - Forbes | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Described by Forbes as "a hybrid of Netflix, traditional art galleries and social media", Artify.it could be on its way to making art - and the more daunting art collecting - fit into the "everyday" for a wider audience. Launched to 3000 beta users just this past week, Artify gives users the opportunity to browse the work of various artists online and display choice pieces in their homes and offices for as long or as little as they like for a monthly subscription fee - essentially a web-based art gallery with a return policy.

 

What's missing here is the traditional gallery experience; the interpersonal connections formed by walking into a gallery, talking with curators, and creating a lifelong commitment to purchased pieces. But what's gained is the confidence, capability, and consciousness of a new generation of art appreciators. Younger, less financially-able patrons with any level of understanding of the art world could now have a less stressful and burdensome introduction to the field.

 

As founder Lorenzo Thione explains, Artify's value lies in adapting to present social expectations of the gallery model, and making art more accessible to today's potential patrons. “The barriers of entering the traditional gallery market are so high. The attitude behind it is that you don’t know enough . . . You’re making a for-life commitment. Artify is more about dating it, where the gallery experience is more about marrying it,” he told Forbes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Kevin Van Aelst - Fingerprint Art

Kevin Van Aelst - Fingerprint Art | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Each individual has a unique set of fingerprints. Artist Kevin Van Aelst takes this romantically mundane fact and merges it with the unique set of materials his own fingerprints come into contact with in his series of photographs simply titled, "Fingerprints." A Cornell graduate with an MFA from the University of Hartford, Van Aelst is currently based in Connecticut, where he teaches photography courses (http://www.kevinvanaelst.com/bio.html). Fittingly titled, "Left ring finger," "Right thumb," "Right ring finger," and so on for a full set of ten fingers and their prints, each 40"x30" photograph showcases the intricate, curved patterns of Van Aelst's very own fingerprints, and highlights the unique experiences of each - what it has touched, where it has been, what it's been up to. Exposing little pieces of his day and himself through what he has left his prints on: the tape of a cassette, sugar packets in a coffee shop, mustard on his sandwich, unraveled red yarn, and even the presents left in his cat's litterbox, Van Aelst challenges viewers to think about where they have been and what they have touched. It's a simple concept at its core - after all, most of us leave our fingerprints on hundreds of objects and surfaces each day - presented in a meticulous, thought-provoking display that begs the limitless question, "What have I touched today?" You can find more of what Van Aelst has touched, and photographed, here: http://www.kevinvanaelst.com/art.html.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

ImagineNations - Decoupaged Globes by Wendy Gold

ImagineNations - Decoupaged Globes by Wendy Gold | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

North Bay, California based artist Wendy Gold is in the business of giving others the world - literally. Launched in 2010, Gold's ImagineNations collection takes vintage globes (some so old as to be geographically outdated!) and turns them into the canvases for decoupage art. Gold has experimented with unusual canvases for the past decade, first breaking onto the scene with transformed toilet seats and bathroom scales, before moving on to globes. She uses only recycled materials in her decoupage, and her globe repetoire has grown to include wedding and birth announcements, graduation gifts, and motivational statements, as well as the world of cartoons and children's books (Superman and other heroes, Dr. Seuss' "Oh, The Places You'll Go!" and Maurice Sendak's "Where the Wild Things Are" are among those sampled on her website).

 

These and her other beautifully designed globes, including Ceres, shown above, covered in winding vines, florals, and butterflies, are available for perusal at http://artonglobes.com/. Globes are sold in 6, 10, and 12-inch sizes, with customization (addition of names, dates, spotlight areas, etc.) available on any size globe for fees ranging from $50-1,500 and the base price for a 12-inch globe ~$500.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Potato piles capture Calke's story | ntcalkeabbey

Potato piles capture Calke's story | ntcalkeabbey | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Earlier this summer, Takahiro Iwasaki was invited to participate in a residency made possible by National Trust Calke Abbey in Derbyshire. His work remained on display through July 8, a period of only a few weeks as dictated by the fragility of his medium: potatoes.

 

Takahiro, a Japanese artist who received an advanced degree from the Edinburgh College of Art, is acclaimed for unique art made from everyday materials. His portfolio has seen the transformation of pencil lead, the thread of fraying socks, and a variety of organic products into delicate miniature sculptures.

 

His time in the UK spurred a deep interest in "the permanence of the buildings in comparison to the relative temporary nature of those in Japan, with buildings such as Calke Abbey in Derbyshire emphasising the difference between the two countries." During his residency at Calke Abbey, Takahiro created small-scale environments out of chunks of potatoes, working the natural and inevitable decay that occurred over the course of the exhibition into the significance behind the piece -- a sort of tribute to the decomposition of the Calke estate.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Curating The Impossible: 65 Years Of Invisible Art

Curating The Impossible: 65 Years Of Invisible Art | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

You wait for hours to gain admission to an art exhibition, standing in line with thousands of other anxious gallery-goers . . . only to enter and find nearly, well, nothing. A new exhibition at the Hayward Gallery in London provides this very curatorial challenge, featuring the art of the invisible. “Many of the works re-direct our attention towards the unwritten rules and conventions that shape our understanding of art . . . Others underscore the limits of our perceptual capacities or emphasise the role of our imagination,” explains curator Ralph Rugoff. Featured artists include Yves Klein, innovator in the field, Andy Warhol, and Tom Friedman; the works all share common themes of invisibility, transience, and absence -- such as the "Magic Ink" paintings by Gianni Motti, which are made using invisible ink that only remains visible for a few fleeting seconds before disappearing as if it was never there. Check it all out before it's gone: http://www.we-make-money-not-art.com/archives/2012/07/invisible-art-about-the-unseen.php.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Junkculture: Dan Cretu: Playing with Food

Junkculture: Dan Cretu: Playing with Food | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Dan Cretu gets his daily servings of fruits and vegetables . . . and experiments with them as the medium of his art sculptures. Cretu, a photographer and innovative visual artist, uses oranges, peppers, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, and other fruits and veggies, to recreate everyday objects, like the radio featured above, cameras, motorcycles, and bikes.

 

His work certainly looks good enough to eat -- check out his portfolio on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dan-Cretu/289128557820339) and Tumblr (http://dancretu.tumblr.com/post/26617167322).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Everyday life on display | Museum

Everyday life on display | Museum | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Most of the objects featured on this topic have been altered to achieve their status; they cannot simply be classified as "art" due to their "everyday" nature, but it is through the labor of the maker that the beauty in the mundane comes to be qualified. The objects on display in "Museum", a recently opened New York gallery, are not in any way adapted to obtain such status. Rather the opposite, in fact. These objects, personal and professional, boring and bizarre, are displayed with all the decorum that would be given to a fine art exhibition. They remain unaltered from their original state, and are accompanied by a story detailing their "lives" and how they came to be there.

 

As advertised on its website, Museum's "Current exhibitions include toothpaste from around the world, found paper works from various copying machines, personal possessions from the bottom of the sea, misspelled food labels, hand modified watches, newspaper weights, and more" (http://mmuseumm.com/). The toothpaste display referenced is running for another three days (through June 30, 2012) and is quite extensive, featuring twenty tubes from locations throughout the globe on loan from the collection of Tucker Viemeister.

 

Museum was founded by Benny and Josh Safdie and Alex Kalman earlier this year. Its focus on "objects, those small, forgotten and often overlooked treasures that have a lot to say about society, the world and its history" is mirrored by its intriguing location: it occupies what was formerly a freight elevator in the back alley of a Broadway paper warehouse (http://www.slowear.com/a-museum-of-things/).

 

The concept of displaying everyday items for their sheer artistic value as a vessel into the human story is not unique to America, however. In Italy, the Museo del Quotidiano (Museum of the Everyday) serves a similar aim (http://www.museoguatelli.it/museo-del-quotidiano/). Inspired by teacher and collector Ettore Guatelli, the emphasis of the Museo is on items of past generations, especially those of more rural times. Hammers, shovels, barrels, and other objects that were used day in and day out and over time came to form a very inseparable part of the people who worked with them are laid out for public viewing; but here,"they are not displayed according to a traditional teaching standard, with reconstructed interiors and pedantic explanations; on the contrary, they fill the walls with simple geometric patterns that seem to be inspired by the avant-garde artistic movements of the twentieth century."

 

Just as the team at LitCouture hopes to share with this board, these museums show the ways that ordinary, everyday objects hold meanings both artistic and personal within them, serving as the physical representations of the rich story and imagery that make up the lives in which they have been a part.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino from Art @ its best!!!
Scoop.it!

Pencil Tip Sculptures by Dalton Ghetti

Pencil Tip Sculptures by Dalton Ghetti | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Connecticut carpenter Dalton Ghetti takes a new spin to sculpture, using his medium as his subject. He has been making intricate miniature sculptures from the graphite at the tip of a pencil for over 25 years now, though he has never sold his pieces, only giving them away to friends as gifts.

 

This process began for Ghetti as a child, when he would carve his friends' names into the sides of pencils as presents. He then moved on to wooden sculptures of a larger scale, but liked the challenge of extremely small works. After experimenting with everything from chalk to soap to tree bark, Ghetti settled on graphite as his medium of choice. Without the assistance of a magnifying glass, Ghetti makes his pencil tip sculptures using just a razor blade, sculpting knife, and sewing needle. “I use the sewing needle to make holes or dig into the graphite. I scratch and create lines and turn the graphite around slowly in my hand. Also, I never buy the pencils, my friends are always giving me them to sculpt or sometimes I use ones I find in the street," he explains (http://bit.ly/MM0iCg).


As would be expected, Ghetti does face the inevitable problem of the pencil tips breaking. They are, after all, fragile materials to work with! Most of his sculptures take several months to complete, and some of the more intricate several years, but Ghetti keeps all of the pieces that break during that process, displaying them atop styrofoam blocks, a tribute to the patience and time devoted to each, and the life he once breathed into them (http://bit.ly/MKWW4z). 

 

To date Ghetti has carved about 100 sculptures, as well as maintaining a ten-year project he began in 2002 that was inspired by the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center: “When September 11 happened I was in tears all day and couldn’t do much for a while. I decided to make a teardrop pencil carving for each of the people who died in the attack, about 3,000. Since 2002 I have carved one every day, it takes me under an hour. When I’m done they will form one big tear drop. It will take me about 10 years but it will be worth it” (http://bit.ly/MM0iCg).


Via MikAn
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino from Art @ its best!!!
Scoop.it!

Shadow Paintings - Rashad Alakbarov

Shadow Paintings - Rashad Alakbarov | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Classifying Rasad Alakbarov's art is surprisingly difficult: painting? Sculpture? Collage, even? Whatever it is, the Azerbaijan artist's creations are truly spectacular. Alakbarov "paints" without a palette, using light as his medium and earning his superlative as "the master of shadows."

 

The piece shown here was on display this past winter 2011 at the De Pury Gallery in London. It begs the simple question: how?! Alakbarov's process starts out routinely enough: he collects found translucent objects. He then plays with their suspension, elevation, and interaction so that the light and shadows cast by the objects onto the wall form images: of cityscapes, portraits, and social statements. These results are not always clear at first; "Alakbarov plays with the ideas of concealing and revealing with his giant installations. Upon initial view, his pieces are seemingly in disarray. After further investigation, the viewer discovers a painting of shadows and light cast on the wall and is able to look at the piece in a different way, with a fresh, new set of eyes" (http://bit.ly/KyQHNp).

 

More of Alakbarov's mesmerizing displays are visible here: http://on.fb.me/Mw19H0.


Via MikAn
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino from Art @ its best!!!
Scoop.it!

Graffiti Hotel Room In France

Graffiti Hotel Room In France | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Known as the "Panic Room", this hotel suite in Marseille's Au Vieux Panier hotel has been thoroughly "graffiti bombed" by internationall recognized graffiti artist Tilt.

 

The room features half clean, white walls, and half painted in colorful graffiti by Tilt. Deeming himself a graffiti traditionalist, Tilt "loves demonstrating that basic, primitive graffiti can be as strong as complicated 3D lettering, wildstyles and characters. His focus on fun, high impact shapes and strong colours is a reflection of his history as a true graffiti writer, trained on the streets and in the train yards" (http://graffitilt.blogspot.com/). His work with "agnostic fonts" is currently on display through July 7 in Barcelona, and images of all his work are available on his Blogspot site.


Via MikAn
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino from Art @ its best!!!
Scoop.it!

Book Igloo Held Together By Natural Forces And Knowledge

Book Igloo Held Together By Natural Forces And Knowledge | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

This "igloo" installation piece by Colombian artist Miler Lagos is constructed entirely of books - but not just any books. Lagos salvaged these books from the library of a US Naval base and fittingly titled it "Home", as it is meant to represent: "Encompassing knowledge and mind adventure while the body remains under a comfortable, predator-free structure" (http://bit.ly/OhkmAw).

 

The structure is 9 feet tall and made without any kind of glue or paste. The books are placed strategically so that they rely on each other's natural properties to shape the igloo. The pages face outward, creating a predominantly white exterior that resembles an igloo, with blocks of color from the book bindings poking through. The spines, sharing the titles of the former library books, face inward, to be read and appreciated as a visual maze of knowledge.

 

Nearly half of the structure is notable, however, for not even being there. The rest of the igloo substitutes bricks for books - a work in progress held in the moment. Check out more mindblowing images of the book igloo here: http://bit.ly/OhkmAw.


Via MikAn
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Henry Hargreaves & Deep Fried iPads

Henry Hargreaves & Deep Fried iPads | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Scrolling through the mental amusement park that is Thought Catalog, the headline "Here is a Deep Fried iPad" http://thoughtcatalog.com/2012/here-is-a-deep-fried-ipad/) earned the requisite double take. Over the past two weeks, photographer Henry Hargreaves' "Deep Fried Gadgets" collection has been featured in reports from Wired Magazine (http://bit.ly/KSiKsh), the New York Daily News (http://nydn.us/N6OklT), MSNBC (http://on.msnbc.com/L30BpY), and the Huffington Post (http://huff.to/PoAfTF), among others.

 

Now, before you get too alarmed - the image above is NOT a real MacBook. Nor are the iPads, iPods, GameBoys or other gadgets deep fried by Hargreaves the "real" objects themselves, but rather foam replicas. Cognizant of the high cost of these technologies, and not too eager to see the effects of batter and oil on lithium batteries, Hargreaves photographed the devices and printed the images onto foamcore, before slathering on the fat and tossing them in the deep fryer (http://henryhargreaves.com/).

 

After getting past the initial shock of the resulting images, the conscious consumer (no pun intended) should take note of the social message behind this project. As Hargreaves told the Huffington Post, "I see similarities between tech culture and fast food. Quickly devoured and then discarded."

 

In the midst of rampant concern over obesity, the world also faces potential long-term damages caused by consumption of high-tech gadgets. As reported by Wired, each of the United States' 245 million cell phones only last for an average of 18 months. At that rate, by the end of this year just about one billion will be found in dumps (many of which are in Asia), bringing with them dangerous toxic waste. So, there you have it: the consequences of electronic consumption may not be as different from the fat deposits that result from daily deep fried dinners as you would expect. And now you know what a deep fried MacBook looks like.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino from Wearable Art
Scoop.it!

Stitchtagram - Custom Instagram Pillows

Stitchtagram - Custom Instagram Pillows | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

LitCouture recently highlighted Rachel Pfeffer's jewelry line on our Wearable Art topic (http://www.scoop.it/t/wearcouture), but her other major project, Stitchtagram, was worth featuring twice! Brother-sister team Doug and Rachel Pfeffer run the Washington, D.C.-based company that custom-makes 15-inch throw pillows featuring the buyer's favorite Instagram photos. Layouts are fully customizable with their online design tool, and photos can be printed in 2" x 2" or 5" x 5" settings. The pillowbacks are dark navy and each is sewn by hand, with the selected photos printed digitally on linen-cotton canvas. Each pillow costs $64 (currently on sale from $94.50!) and takes about 2-3 weeks to manufacture; gift certificates are also available.

 

As they explain on their website (http://stitchtagram.com/about): "Why do we think anyone needs an item like this? Because we believe that the internet is not enough for your memories. It's a shame when great and memorable photos fall off your Instagram feed, never to seen again. Our pillows let you keep your photos alive by bringing them out into the real world, to be enjoyed every day. These are going to last longer than your iPhone, and are much more comfortable to take a nap on." Check out some samples of their work here: http://blog.stitchtagram.com/.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino from Art Resources
Scoop.it!

Art at the Office: The Scotch Off the Roll Tape Sculpture Contest

Art at the Office: The Scotch Off the Roll Tape Sculpture Contest | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

Jake Longenecker's "Free Fallin" (above), a mid-drop World War II paratrooper made from 15 rolls of Scotch tape, was awarded first prize in the 2012 Scotch Off the Roll Tape Sculpture Contest, sponsored by 3M. Over 100 incredible entries were submitted (http://www.offtherollcontest.com/viewentries.aspx), and judge Mark Jenkins, with the assistance of an online voting contest, lowered the field down to these lucky four: http://www.offtherollcontest.com/winners.html.


Via Maia Swanson
more...
Jessica McLain's curator insight, September 3, 2013 11:48 PM

Proving art can be created from anything you can imagine.

Scooped by Christina Yu & Michelle Dimino
Scoop.it!

Adam Niklewicz - Borscht & Beyond

Adam Niklewicz - Borscht & Beyond | The Art of Everyday | Scoop.it

A three-dimensional rug that rises up like a wave; a once-bitten slice of bread slathered with a layer of oil paint; a dried sausage turned musical instrument; a white pencil stuck by its point into a white wall; 16,000 stacked up foam earplugs; sausage; borscht; dead bees. These are but a sampling of the materials that artist Adam Niklewicz uses in his sculpture. Born in Poland and based in the U.S., Niklewicz melds cultural elements from his Polish past into the art of his present "in an absurd collision where nostalgia, self awareness, and the Romantic are all equal causalities" (Stephen Holmes, Curator - http://www.adamniklewicz.com/intro). No material is off limits, and his repetoire features a variety of food items in gravity-defying suspensions. His 2009 "Monument to Borscht" (shown above) presents stacked spoons ascending from a plate of the Eastern European soup. 2008's "Egg, Some Seventy Inches Off the Floor"consists of an egg atop a tape measure. "Romantycznosc" (2002) is a Polish sausage dried and cut into to form a fully functional recorder. His 2011 piece "Rome" appears to be a slice of bread on a plain white plate - however, a panorama of the Eternal City is in fact visible through the holes of the bread. His work is currently part of a group exhibition in his native Poland, and has been commissioned for many solo and group displays throughout the world. His intriguing portfolio can be seen here: http://www.adamniklewicz.com/works.

more...
No comment yet.