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Indian River Lagoon algae: Harmful algae devastate Indian River Lagoon

Indian River Lagoon algae: Harmful algae devastate Indian River Lagoon | everett ce marine biology | Scoop.it
TITUSVILLE — The lagoon that hugs much of Florida's east coast and has the richest array of marine plants, fish and wildlife in North America is under attack from the worst known outbreak of...

Via Kathy Dowsett
Hannah's insight:

The Indian River Lagoon, which extends 156 miles from New Smyrna Beach south to Jupiter, is at risk of a chain reaction of die-offs and disappearances of countless species. Pollution is a suspected cause of this algae invasion, but a team of 25 scientists and experts from nine organizations is investigating whether unusually cold weather the past two winters and an ongoing drought might have played a role.

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Rescooped by Hannah from Marine Biology and Oceanography
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Phytoplankton: Plants of the Sea

Everyone, plankton are cool. They are the bottom of the food chain, and they feed numerous species of fish and other animals. Without them, you can forget about seafood on the menu.


Via Kevin F.
Hannah's insight:

The plant portion of this complex oceanic soup is called phytoplankton.  The term phyto comes from the Latin phyton meaning tree or plant.  This large grouping is composed mostly of single-celled algae and bacteria.

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Rescooped by Hannah from Aquaculture and Fisheries - World Briefing
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European Union pressures Denmark to protect reefs

European Union pressures Denmark to protect reefs | everett ce marine biology | Scoop.it

European Commission threatens legal action to force halt to dredging and trawling in marine habitats the government has promised to protect.

 

Environmental organisations have warned that the Danish sea floor is not being adequately protected from dangerous fishing practices such as trawling and dredging, and experts are now arguing that only a total ban would allow marine ecosystems to recover.

 

One of the ecosystems most at threat are boulder reefs that can be home to tens of thousands of marine species. But the boulders have been exploited for many years for use in sea walls and harbour defences, reducing the extent of these fragile habitats to a fraction of their former extent.

 

Danish boulder reefs were included in the European Commission’s (EC) Natura 2000 list of the EU's protected environmental areas, though trawling and dredging is still allowed near them – practices that experts argue should be banned outright.

 

“We should completely forbid trawling in boulder and bubble reefs because they are so damaging,” Karsten Dahl, a Marine biologist with Aarhus University told Politiken newspaper.

 

The EC last week chastised the government for not doing enough to protect sea floor habitats in Natura 2000 areas, and threatened legal action unless the government upheld its commitments.

 

Responding to the call, the fisheries minister, Mette Gjerskov, said action needed to be taken and that she would delay handing out mussel dredging permits in the Lillebælt waterway for three weeks while the government examined the issue.

 

“The former government took their time in identifying marine areas to be covered by Natura 2000 and make plans for them. Now we are ready for banning trawling and dredging on both bubble and boulder reefs,” Gjerskov told Politiken.

 

Greenpeace welcomed the decision but argued it had been a long time coming.

 

“Today it is completely legal for trawlers to drag their heavy nets right through a boulder reef that the government had otherwise selected as an area worthy of protection” Greenpeace fisheries correspondent Hanne Lyng Winter wrote on the organisation’s website.

 

Lyng criticised the government’s decision not to ban trawling outright, a practice Greenpeace argues can wipe out life on the sea floor.

 

According to Politiken, only the boulder reefs protected as Natura 2000 areas will be protected with 240 meter buffer zones 240 meter buffer zones from trawling and dredging.

 

“This approach using buffer zones isn’t very ambitious and, according to by my best assessment, it would only protect the reefs against direct destruction but will not benefit the entire ecosystem or sea floor biodiversity.”

 

She added that the buffer zones would be difficult to enforce and would create small protected pockets on the sea floor, a practice the EC advises against.

 

Lyng conceded that the government’s efforts were a first step in the right direction, but added that much more needed to be done to help Denmark’s marine wildlife recover from overfishing.

 

This is not the first time Denmark has been chastised by the EC for not living up to commitments to enforce environmental protection. In 2010 the EC wrote to the previous government over complaints from environmental organisations that it was not doing enough to protect marine Natura 2000 areas from mussel dredging.

 


Via Αλιεία alieia.info
Hannah's insight:

Denmark is not living up to its commitments to enforce envionmental protection. It is not the first time either.

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Rescooped by Hannah from marine biology
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The Echinoblog: How many starfish species are there?? Where do they Live? How long have they been around? Five Points about Sea Star Diversity!

The Echinoblog: How many starfish species are there?? Where do they Live? How long have they been around? Five Points about Sea Star Diversity! | everett ce marine biology | Scoop.it

Via Gaye Rosier
Hannah's insight:

There are about 42 known starfish species, they live all over the ocean, they live on coral reefs and at the bottom of the ocean. They have been around as long as dinosours. 

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Rescooped by Hannah from marine biology
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This cardinal fish father can't feed while he incubates his brood in his mouth....

This cardinal fish father can't feed while he incubates his brood in his mouth.... | everett ce marine biology | Scoop.it
This cardinal fish father can't feed while he incubates his brood in his mouth. It's a good strategy to keep them safe. Our volunteer divers saw lots of new youngster had survived.

Via Gaye Rosier
Hannah's insight:

This makes it so pretitors can't get to them, and makes sure they are safe.

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Rescooped by Hannah from Coral Reef Ecology
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A Mysterious Disease Is Killing Hawaii's Coral | Smart News - Smithsonian (blog)

A Mysterious Disease Is Killing Hawaii's Coral | Smart News - Smithsonian (blog) | everett ce marine biology | Scoop.it
Smithsonian (blog)A Mysterious Disease Is Killing Hawaii's Coral | Smart NewsSmithsonian (blog)The growth, identified by scientists at the U.S.

Via Colin Zylka
Hannah's insight:

Scientists have no idea what’s causing the outbreak, which they say has reached epidemic proportions, though they wonder if the coral may first been weakened by pollution, which made it more susceptible to infection. Though scientists have not found evidence that the disease may affect humans or other wildlife, if the coral dies, then all of the fish, turtles and various invertebrates that depend upon it will soon be lost, too.

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Rescooped by Hannah from WWWBiology
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Facts About Sea Turtles

Facts About Sea Turtles | everett ce marine biology | Scoop.it
Sea turtle facts including biology, habitat, ecology, and threats for each of the seven species.

Via Danette Little Anderson, W H Unsell
Hannah's insight:

Each species relies on a different diet: greens eat sea grasses; leatherbacks feed on jellyfish and soft-bodied animals; loggerheads eat heavy-shelled animals such as crabs and clams; hawksbills rely on sponges and other invertebrates; and the Kemp’s ridley prefers crabs.

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Rescooped by Hannah from marine biology
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Turtle genome analysis sheds light on turtle ancestry and shell evolution

Turtle genome analysis sheds light on turtle ancestry and shell evolution | everett ce marine biology | Scoop.it
From which ancestors have turtles evolved? How did they get their shell? New data provides evidence that turtles are not primitive reptiles but belong to a sister group of birds and crocodiles.

Via Gaye Rosier
Hannah's insight:

Turtles are often described as evolutionary monsters, with a unique body plan and a shell that is considered to be one of the most intriguing structures in the animal kingdom.

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Rescooped by Hannah from marine ecosystems
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TARA OCEANS completes 60000-mile journey to map marine biodiversity - PhysOrg.com

TARA OCEANS completes 60000-mile journey to map marine biodiversity - PhysOrg.com | everett ce marine biology | Scoop.it
PhysOrg.comTARA OCEANS completes 60000-mile journey to map marine biodiversityPhysOrg.comThe arrival completes a journey of 60 000 miles across all the world's major oceans to sample and investigate microorganisms in the largest ecosystem on the planet,...

Via Riley
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The scientists taking part in the TARA OCEANS expedition want to understand how the populations of microscopic organisms that make up 98% of life in the oceans interact with the environment and how these complex systems have evolved over time. "It is an interplay between the different species and each species affects the environment," explained Karsenti in a live interview with Molecular Systems Biology. "Oceans are very heterogeneous both geographically and at different depths — each water mass has a different ecosystem."

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Rescooped by Hannah from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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Facts About Coral Reefs | Great Barrier Reef | Cairns, Australia

Facts About Coral Reefs | Great Barrier Reef | Cairns, Australia | everett ce marine biology | Scoop.it

Quick and Fast Facts • The Great Barrier Reef is the largest structure built by living organisms on the Earth today. • The Great Barrier Reef region is the world’s largest group of coral reefs. • There are three main types of reefs found on the Great Barrier Reef: Ribbon, Platform, and Fringing reefs. • Tiny masses of coral polyps are responsible for building coral reefs. • Coral Reefs make up 6% of the entire Great Barrier Reef Marine Park by Area. • Reefs are masses of limestone made from skeletons of millions upon millions of tiny marine animals and plants. • Main threats to coral reefs include human activities, coral bleaching and crown-of-thorn starfish outbreaks. The Continental Shelf provides the platform from which the reefs of the Great Barrier Reef develop. In the north, the continental shelf lies close to the coast and gradually widens as it extends south


Via Kathy Dowsett
Hannah's insight:

Humans are the main threat to coral reefs. The Great Barrier Reefs makes up 6% of all the reefs. It is the largest Stucture built by living organisms on earth today.

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Rescooped by Hannah from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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Indian River Lagoon algae: Harmful algae devastate Indian River Lagoon

Indian River Lagoon algae: Harmful algae devastate Indian River Lagoon | everett ce marine biology | Scoop.it
TITUSVILLE — The lagoon that hugs much of Florida's east coast and has the richest array of marine plants, fish and wildlife in North America is under attack from the worst known outbreak of...

Via Kathy Dowsett
Hannah's insight:

The Indian River Lagoon, which extends 156 miles from New Smyrna Beach south to Jupiter, is at risk of a chain reaction of die-offs and disappearances of countless species. Pollution is a suspected cause of this algae invasion, but a team of 25 scientists and experts from nine organizations is investigating whether unusually cold weather the past two winters and an ongoing drought might have played a role.

more...
No comment yet.