Eugenics
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Eugenics is currently defined as the “applied science or the bio-social movement which advocates the use of practices aimed at improving the genetic composition of a population.
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Patent damages: No longer guilty if proved innocent - Managing Intellectual Property (subscription)

Patent damages: No longer guilty if proved innocent - Managing Intellectual Property (subscription) | Eugenics | Scoop.it
Patent damages: No longer guilty if proved innocent Managing Intellectual Property (subscription) The apparent unfairness of being liable for damages for infringing a subsequently invalidated patent was highlighted in a previous article entitled...
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Eugenics still close to home

Eugenics still close to home | Eugenics | Scoop.it

In 1883, Francis Galton published “Inquiries into Human Faculty and Its Development” and introduced to the world the term “eugenics.” His view was that for the betterment of the human race, society should improve itself by weeding out the “undesirables.” Galton pressed for the study of eugenics to become widespread. These ideas did take root — much closer to home than you might expect.

 

After the idea of eugenics began to take hold of the medical and social sciences, many people hoped to improve their community and future by disallowing certain peoples the ability to reproduce.

 

This culture quickly turned to practices involving sterilization and making those deemed unfit for society unable to reproduce. In 1897, the Michigan Legislature became the first in the U.S. to propose a law allowing the sterilization of those deemed inferior. The law passed in the legislature but later was vetoed by Gov. Hazen S. Pingree. It wasn’t long after, however, that other states began proposing, and passing, similar laws.

 

As these sterilization laws became widespread throughout the nation, a culture of superior vs. inferior began to develop. The eradication of the “weaker” people for the betterment of future generations began to take hold and become acceptable in America. In 1927, in the ruling of the case Buck v. Bell, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes stated in favor of forced sterilization:

“It is better for all the world if, instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind.”

As the 20th century began to unfold, the ideas of eugenics and the methods to go about it began to take a turn. People began to use the “noble” cause of eugenics to single out groups and races.

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Ngozi Odochi (Godwell) Nwokocha's comment, July 8, 2013 9:04 AM
Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, courted eugenicists for their support of her radical “birth control” to breed out “dysgenic stocks” such as the “Jewish, Hispanics, Native Americans and Catholics.” Her cause was focused in promoting positive views of birth control while using it as a method to slow the growth of minority populations.

Big names, such as John D. Rockefeller and J.H. Kellogg, used their assets to promote research of eugenics and established organizations such as the Race Betterment Foundation. Kellogg once spoke in favor of eugenics as a way of promoting “…the whiter races of Europe [and] to establish a Race of Human Thoroughbreds.” In the late 1920s and early ‘30s, Rockefeller even worked with Nazi researchers, funding collaboration in American labs on the study of a “super race.” These studies were the basis of Josef Mengele’s infamous twin studies which later were practiced in Auschwitz, the Nazi concentration camp.

The application of eugenics in America continued after WWII, and forced sterilization continued until as late as the 1970s.

And the influence the early 20th century eugenics movement had on America still is impacting us today.

The state of North Carolina struggled with suits and had considered compensation for victims of eugenics in 2012. Planned Parenthood receives millions of dollars worth of taxpayer funding each year. The concentration of Planned Parenthood offices are in impoverished areas with high-minority populations.
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Eugenics

Eugenics | Eugenics | Scoop.it
See on Scoop.it - Eugenics Eugenics is currently defined as the “applied science or the bio-social movement which advocates the use of practices aimed at improving the genetic composition of ...
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Eugenics | Search Results | Parents Rights Blog

Social Services, Family Court System, United Kingdom, United States of America, Parental Rights.
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Eugenics

Eugenics | Eugenics | Scoop.it
Eugenics is currently defined as the “applied science or the bio-social movement which advocates the use of practices aimed at improving the genetic composition of a population.
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Scientific Racism: The Eugenics of Social Darwinism

This video is for educational purposes. The information has been hidden for many years and it is very important to bear witness to.

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Social Origins of Eugenics

Social Origins of Eugenics | Eugenics | Scoop.it
See on Scoop.it - Eugenics The eugenics movement arose in the 20th century as two wings of a common philosophy of human worth. Francis Galton, who coined the term eugenics in 1883, perceived it as ...
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Daniel Kevles on the History of Eugenics, In the Name of Eugenics

from Stay Free!, a magazine focussed on American media and consumer culture

"Imagine yourself in the heart of Kansas, at the annual state fair, in 1928. Past the dunking booth and Ferris wheel, the stands selling corn dogs and cotton candy, farmers from around the state have gathered to show off the year's yields. Amid the horses, cattle, and hogs, a blue-eyed blonde family of four is displayed on an elevated platform. Over their heads is a large banner: fitter families contest....."


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Ngozi Odochi (Godwell) Nwokocha's comment, July 8, 2013 9:02 AM
Long before Adolf Hitler hit his stride, American activists worked to breed a better, whiter race. Historian Daniel Kevles discusses the U.S. eugenics movement, Fitter Families, and efforts to segregate, sterilize, and castrate the "unfit."
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Eugenics

Eugenics | Eugenics | Scoop.it
Eugenics is currently defined as the “applied science or the bio-social movement which advocates the use of practices aimed at improving the genetic composition of a population.

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